CFP Romance and the Animal Turn, ICMS 2020 (Kalamazoo)

The animal turn has become hugely influential in medieval scholarship over the last decade. However, the contributions of ecofeminism and queer ecology have often been side-lined. Nevertheless, scholars are increasingly finding these modes of analysis to offer useful ways of exploring the role of the animal in medieval romance texts.

The Medieval Romance Society is hosting three sessions on romance and the animal turn at the 55th International Congress on Medieval Studies 2020, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo. All papers must be presented in English; however, we welcome submissions on romances from any region in the Middle Ages. We invite papers that respond to ecofeminist and queer ecological literary criticism; papers that respond to posthumanist and related philosophical theories; and papers which do not take a theoretical approach.

Session I: Romance and the Animal Turn I: Romance and Ecofeminism

This session welcomes papers looking at representations of gender, masculinity and/or femininity in relation to animals and nature in romance texts. Example topics could include: the role of the horse in chivalric masculinity, animal foster-mothers for human children, or gendered discourses of meat-eating. We particularly encourage papers that respond to contemporary ecofeminist theory, although this is not required.

Session II: Romance and the Animal Turn II: Romance and Queer Ecology

This session invites papers looking at representations of sex and sexuality and/or queer identity in relation to discourses of animals and nature in romance texts. Papers might explore the role of animals in the construction of heteronormative ideologies, queer animals in romance narratives, and species panic. We particularly encourage papers that respond to contemporary theories of queer ecology, although this is not required.

Session III: Romance and the Animal Turn III: Romance and Posthumanism

This session welcomes papers that explore discourses of human and animal identity in romance texts. Example topics could include: the role of the animal in ideologies of race, interspecies hybridity, and animal subjectivity in romance. We particularly encourage papers that respond to contemporary posthumanist theory, although this is not required.

Please send abstracts of up to 300 words to Tim Wingard (tw659@york.ac.uk) by 1 September 2019.

For more information, visit: medievalromanceanimal.wordpress.com

CFP David Nichol Smith Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Studies XVII, Adelaide

Proposals are invited for the David Nichol Smith Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Studies XVII ‘Dark Enlightenments’, to take place 2-4 December 2020 in Adelaide, Australia.

Keynotes: Associate Professor Kate Fullager (Macquarie)
Professor Sasha Handley (Manchester)
Associate Professor Eugenia Zuroski (McMaster)

The Australian and New Zealand Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ANZSECS), Flinders University, and the University of Adelaide invite you to the 17th David Nichol Smith (DNS) Seminar for Eighteenth-Century Studies. Inaugurated in 1966 by the National Library of Australia, the DNS is the leading forum for eighteenth-century studies in Australasia. It brings together scholars from across the region and internationally who work on the long eighteenth century in a range of disciplines, including history, literature, art and architectural history, philosophy, theology, the history of science, musicology, anthropology, archaeology and studies of material culture.

The theme for this conference is ‘Dark Enlightenments.’ We ask delegates to consider the dark, shadowy aspects of enlightenment processes of the eighteenth century. When broadly conceived, the theme is open to numerous up-to-the-minute, interdisciplinary possibilities, including (for example):

  • the dark side of the public sphere, such as expressed in satire and polemic;
  • Empire and enlightenment;
  • critiques of empathy and humanitarianism;
  • negative emotions;
  • crime, conflict and violence;
  • the use and abuse of the past;
  • progress and ethics (political, social, scientific);
  • war;
  • romanticising death;
  • the Gothic;
  • the numinous eighteenth century;
  • the transformation of night-time;
  • developments in notions of privacy, secrecy and the hidden self;
  • the “shady” moralities of libertinism;
  • the aesthetics of darkness and light.

This, we believe, is a particularly timely theme, partly owing to the nationalist turn in global politics, and the recent controversy stirred in Australia by the proposed Ramsay Centre for Western Civilisation. It offers both sides of the political spectrum the opportunity to interrogate and fully understand the costs, benefits, and legacies of eighteenth-century “progress.” It is also a theme designed to emphasise the Enlightenment in its moral complexity and richness, and the wide range of domains (from the everyday to philosophical thought) that contributed to its production.

We also welcome papers for subjects that fall outside the main conference theme.

Proposals for 20-minute papers should consist of a title, 250-word abstract, and short bio sent via email as a pdf attachment to DNS2020@flinders.edu.au.

We also accept proposals for panels of three papers, which should include all the above for each presenter, a panel title, and if possible, the name and short bio of the panel chair.

Deadlines for submissions:

For early deliberation: 1 November 2019.
A first round of acceptances will be made shortly after this date to facilitate international attendance.

Final deadline: 1 March 2020

For further details, please consult the conference website: https://dnsxvii2020.wordpress.com/

Highlights from the Parergon archives: Methodology and medievalism

We asked members of Parergon‘s Early Career Committee to tell us about a Parergon article that really stood out for them and why they found it valuable for their research. In this post, Bronwyn Reddan talks about an innovative 2010 article by Helen Young that tackles important questions about methodology in approaches to medievalism. 

One of the things I enjoy about Parergon is the way it showcases the vibrancy of contemporary medieval and early modern scholarship by publishing articles on a diverse range of topics. My research focuses on early modern women writers, but my interest is often piqued by pieces on the afterlives of literary texts regardless of the period.

One example is Helen Young’s 2010 Parergon article ‘Approaches to Medievalism: A Consideration of Taxonomy and Methodology through Fantasy Fiction’ (
https://doi.org/10.1353/pgn.0.0235 ). This offers a valuable methodological intervention in taxonomies of medievalism by proposing an approach that examines both the historical and imagined ‘medieval’ and the purpose and effects of medievalism. Young applies this approach to modern fantasy writing using case studies from Katharine Kerr’s genre fiction and two short stories by Neil Gaiman.

Through her analysis, Young demonstrates how an examination of the effects of medievalist practice reveal convergent layers of meaning that are not always captured by taxonomies of the use of medieval sources. Young’s more nuanced approach allows her to distinguish between different approaches and engagements with medieval source material by Kerr and Gaiman, while acknowledging similarities in their use of medievalism to engage in social commentary and critique.

Parergon can be accessed via Project MUSE (from Volume 1 (1983)), Australian Public Affairs – Full Text (from 1994), and Humanities Full Text (from 2008). For more information on the current issue and on submitting manuscripts for consideration, please visit https://parergon.org/

CFP Australia and New Zealand Law and History Society Conference

The 38th Annual Conference of the Australia and New Zealand Law and History Society will be held on 11-14 December 2019 at Victoria University College of Law & Justice, Melbourne, Australia. The conference theme is Does Law’s History Matter? The Politics of our Disciplinary Practices.

Writing law’s history has long been understood as a purposeful practice, both necessary and never complete, as the eminent British historian F.W. Maitland noted more than a century ago. Today with the flourishing of imperial and postcolonial scholarship, Maitland’s advocacy of researching law’s past prompts renewed attention to the progenitors, methods and politics of our disciplinary practices. The imperative of capturing and presenting that knowledge seems greater than ever before. Yet for those of us engaged in historical study it can often appear that what we do, and why we do it, is not always well recognised or as valued as it should be. Simultaneously, questions abound about the implications of our practice and its political impact or purpose.

For this conference, we invite those who bring an historical perspective on law to consider together the many ways our work has in the past, and continues into the future, to matter. For example: what is the politics in our chosen methods, or the value in our choice of subject matter? Does it matter how we present and produce work for different audiences (court, academy, or public), or has it mattered in the past? Does it matter to the reception of our work what sources we find and why we use them? And does it matter with whom we write; and whose laws, and experiences of law, we write about? What can we learn from critical study, however incomplete? This historical perspective on law is broadly defined – and includes those who position law in a temporal frame, who write legal history or histories of laws, lawmaking, legal ideas, jurisprudence, jurisdiction or legal institutions and their personnel.

On behalf of ANZLHS, the Conference Organizing Committee cordially invites papers on this theme from any period, geographical area, and from all disciplines – including but not limited to law, history, indigenous studies, environmental studies, legal theory, and gender studies. Please note presenters must be members of ANZLHS before their paper is accepted; and all presenters are invited to submit their papers after the conference to the ANZLHS journal, law&history.

Conference website: https://www.deakin.edu.au/about-deakin/events/2019-anzlhs-conference.

Proposals for papers/panels:

Please email proposals for either individual papers (20 mins) or panels of 3-4 speakers or both to anzlhs2019@deakin.edu.au by 21 July 2019.

Individual paper proposals must include an abstract (no more than 300 words) and a biographical statement (no more than 100 words). Panel proposals should include the above, plus a title and brief rationale for the panel as a whole (no more than 300 words) .
Note: All presenters must be financial members of the Australia and New Zealand Law and History Society for 2019. Please go to the ANZLHS website to register or renew your membership: https://anzlhs.org/.

Kercher Scholarships

Details can be found at https://anzlhs.org/prizes-and-scholarships/kercher-scholarships/. Please email applications to the Conference Convenor, Dr Jason Taliadoros at jason.taliadoros@deakin.edu.au by 31 August 2019.

CFP Carving Out Space for the History of Emotions

The call for papers is open for Carving out a Space for the History of Emotions, to be held at UCD Humanities Institute, Dublin, Ireland on 18 January 2020.

Deadline for submission: 16 September 2019

Funded by an Irish Research Council (IRC) New Foundations Award and organised in collaboration with the Architecture and Narrative Project, the UCD Centre for the History of Medicine and the UCD Humanities Institute.

Invited Speakers: Dr. Tiffany Watt-Smith, Prof. Dr. Margrit Pernau, and Dr. Rob Boddice

Since the 1980s, historians have developed a number of methodologies in the process of what Rob Boddice has called “carving out a space in which the history of emotions can exist.” The history of emotions is now one of the main preoccupations of the humanities, so much so that some have declared a ‘turn to emotions.’ This one-day conference aims to highlight the main trends and approaches in the history of emotions, demonstrating, above all, what the history of emotions is and is not. In doing so, it hopes to support the research that is being undertaken in Ireland on the history of emotions while also facilitating future developments. Submissions should address methodologies on topics including, but not limited, to:

  • Built environment and Emotions
  • Emotions, Disease and Health
  • Emotions and Childhood
  • Emotions and War
  • Emotions and Reform
  • Gender, Sexuality, and Emotions
  • Objects and Emotions
  • Affective Dimensions of Source Materials

Scholars from various disciplines and papers on any place/period are welcome. We accept proposals for individual papers, themed sessions, and round tables.

Individual paper sessions will consist of 3 papers, each of which will be presented within 20 minutes. Submissions should include: 1) An abstract of no more than 250 words; 2) A short biography of no more than 100 words including contact information.

Themed sessions will consist of 3 papers, each of which will be presented within 20 minutes. Submissions should include: 1) A 300-word rationale for the session as a whole; 2) An abstract of no more than 250 words for each contributor; 3) A short biography of no more than 100 words for each contributor including contact information.

Round table sessions will consist of 4 papers, each of which will be presented within 10 minutes. Round table sessions will provide an opportunity for researchers to present and discuss work in progress, especially, regarding methodologies. Submissions should include: 1) An abstract of no more than 250 words; 2) A short biography of no more than 100 words including contact information.

Submissions should be sent by 16 September 2019 to Dr. Sara Honarmand Ebrahimi at irelandforthehistoryofemotions@gmail.com.

You will be informed by 31 October 2019 whether your submission has been accepted.

About: The Carving out a Space for the History of Emotions conference is organized as part of the event series “Worrying about the Field of the History of Emotions in Ireland.” The events have been funded by an Irish Research Council New Foundations award and is a collaboration between the Architecture and Narrative project, the UCD Centre for the History of Medicine and the UCD Humanities Institute.

For more information about the events visit https://carvingemotionshistory2019.wordpress.com

2021 Catharine Stimpson Prize for Outstanding Feminist Scholarship

The University of Chicago Press and Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society are pleased to announce the competition for the 2021 Catharine Stimpson Prize for Outstanding Feminist Scholarship. Named in honour of the founding editor of Signs, the Catharine Stimpson Prize is designed to recognize excellence and innovation in the work of emerging feminist scholars.

The Catharine Stimpson Prize is awarded biennially to the best paper in an international competition. Leading feminist scholars from around the globe will select the winner. The prizewinning paper will be published in Signs, and the author will be provided an honorarium of US$1,000. All papers submitted for the Stimpson Prize will be considered for peer review and possible publication in Signs.

Eligibility:

Feminist scholars in the early years of their careers (fewer than seven years since receipt of the terminal degree) are invited to submit papers for the Stimpson Prize. This includes current graduate students. Papers may be on any topic that falls under the broad rubric of interdisciplinary feminist scholarship. Submissions must be no longer than 10,000 words (including notes and references) and must conform to the guidelines for Signs contributors (http://signsjournal.org/for-authors/author-guidelines/).

Deadline for submissions: 1 March, 2020.

Please submit papers online at http://signs.edmgr.com. Be sure to indicate submission for consideration for the Catharine Stimpson Prize. The honorarium will be awarded upon publication of the prizewinning article.

Contact signs@northeastern.edu with any questions.

Job: Postdoctoral Researcher in Medieval Manuscript Studies (0.8FTE)

Radboud University Nijmegen is advertising a position for a Postdoctoral Researcher in Medieval Manuscript Studies (0.8FTE) to be part of the research team of the ERC-funded project Patristic Sermons in the Middle Ages. The dissemination, manipulation and interpretation of Late-Antique sermons in the Medieval Latin West (PASSIM).

The Postdoctoral Researcher will study the customisation of patristic sermon collections for use in the liturgy and Divine Office in medieval manuscripts from the 7th to the 15th century, with a particular emphasis on the Carolingian homiliary of Paul the Deacon and its reception.

Location: Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands
Duration: 3 years
Starting date: 1 January 2020 (negotiable)

Deadline for the application: 18 August 2019
Interviews: 16 September 2019
Contact: Dr. Shari Boodts (PI)

Full details of the job offer can be found here: https://www.ru.nl/werken/details/details_vacature_0/?recid=602071
More information on the research project can be found here: https://applejack.science.ru.nl/passimproject/?page=contact

Entries open for British Records Association prize

Entries to the British Records Association’s annual Janette Harley Prize close on 30 June. The prize is intended to generate interest in archives, and raise awareness of research and achievements in the world of archives. It is open to anyone, and applications are welcomed from individuals, on their own behalf or on behalf of others, and from representatives of organisations.

The prize of £350 will be awarded for the best / most original piece of work published in a monograph, journal or magazine, or otherwise made publicly available, which has promoted “the preservation, understanding, accessibility or study of archives”. The winning entry will be announced following BRA’s Annual General Meeting and Maurice Bond Memorial Lecture, to be held in London on 13 November 2019.

The joint winners of the 2018 Harley Prize were Julie Halls and Allison Martino, for their article “Cloth, Copyright, and Cultural Exchange: Textile Designs for Export to Africa at The National Archives of the UK”.

Further information about the prize, including details of how to enter, can be found on the BRA web-site: https://www.britishrecordsassociation.org.uk/the-janette-harley-prize/british-records-association-janette-harley-prize/

CFP Will and Consent in Medieval Rape Narratives essay collection

Proposals are invited for contributions to the edited essay collection, Nevertheless, She Resisted: Will and Consent in Medieval Rape Narratives.

As Amy Vines notes, rape in medieval literature often functions as a “chivalric necessity,” a means of articulating masculine identity that elides or ignores questions of female bodily sovereignty and autonomy of will in favor of the male protagonist’s development. Yet we also find instances where texts implicitly or explicitly call attention to the act of rape as a violation of female will—whether in dread of the act, in the face of its perpetration, or in its aftermath—or explore the nature of consent and its often problematic conditions or interpretation.

Building on recent work by scholars such as Vines, Elizabeth Robertson, Christine Rose, Suzanne Edwards, and Carissa Harris, this essay collection seeks chapters of 6000-9000 words exploring narratives of resistance in medieval literary portrayals of rape or coercive sex. In what ways might we see such narratives recentering female will and consent? What different modes of resistance to sexual violence do they articulate? To what extent do they return agency to survivors of sexual violence? In what ways do these narratives arouse or disarm resistance on the part of female readers? How might we make issues of will and consent more legible in these texts? Most importantly, what might it mean to read from the woman’s subject position, resisting the masculinist hermeneutic that has largely dominated medieval studies?

Proposals of 300-500 words should be submitted by e-mail to Alison Langdon at alison.langdon@wku.edu. Deadline for proposals is 31 August 2019. Notification of accepted proposals will be made by 30 September 2019, with complete chapters due by 1 June 2020. The volume has been invited for submission to Medieval Institute Publications for its new Premodern Transgressive Literatures series.

CFP Cambridge Elements: Shakespeare and Pedagogy

The new Cambridge Elements Series on ‘Shakespeare and Pedagogy’ is seeking submissions of innovative scholarship of 20,000-30,000 words for peer-reviewed publication. This collection synthesises theory and practice, with original pieces of research as well as dynamic, practical engagements with learning contexts. It aims to facilitate explorations, interventions and provocations:

  • Explorations deliver extended, research-based analyses and pursuits of ideas, processes and practices.
  • Interventions present practical engagements with learning contexts, may involve teachers or practitioners as collaborators, and will speak in direct terms to real teaching situations.
  • Provocations offer critiques of practice and policy, reimagined or reoriented approaches, propositions of alternatives and urgent manifestoes.

Submissions might fall into one of these categories or represent a blend of them.
More information is on the Shakespeare Reloaded website: http://shakespearereloaded.edu.au/research/cambridge-elements-series