Postdoctoral fellowships, Society of Renaissance Studies

The Society for Renaissance Studies invites applications for its Postdoctoral Fellowships, which support research in all aspects of Renaissance studies. There will be two Postdoctoral Fellowships awarded in the academic year 2019-20, each worth £9500.

Eligibility

  • Applicants must be graduates of British or Irish universities, and currently engaged in full-time research, part-time teaching or independent scholarship.
  • Applicants must either already have been awarded their PhD (from a British or Irish university) no more than five years before 1 October 2019, or have been provisionally awarded their PhD by 31 May 2019, subject to no more than minor corrections. (These corrections must be due to be completed and accepted by the awarding university no later than 1 October 2019, and applicants applying before their PhD has been passed will need to provide evidence of the status of their PhD when applying).
  • In normal circumstances, such Fellowships should not be held in conjunction with a postdoctoral or academic teaching post which is for more than 60% of a full-time post.

Conditions

  • The period of tenure is twelve months from 1 October 2019.
  • Fellows are required to become members of the SRS and will be invited to attend meetings of the Society’s Council.
  • Fellows will be asked to present their findings at the end of the period of award, and to submit a written report for publication in the Society’s Bulletin
  • Fellows must name the Society for Renaissance Studies in their affiliation in any publications and conference papers presenting the research.
  • There are no specific residence requirements for successful applicants taking up a Fellowship.

Applicants should submit a single document by 30 April 2019, giving, in this order:

  • Name and contact details (name, address, email address, telephone number).
  • Project description (covering the research questions, existing debate in the areas, and how the applicant proposes to change this by their research). Maximum 1000 words.
  • A CV (including a brief account of their research to date, publication list, and a statement of their proposed means of financial support during the year of the Fellowship). Maximum 1000 words.
  • Name and contact details (including up-to-date email addresses) of two referees. The Fellowships committee will ask referees to provide references by no later than 31 May 2019. Applicants should ensure that their referees have submitted their references by this date.
  • Proof of the status of the PhD, where not yet awarded, should be submitted as a separate document, where relevant.

Waitangi Tribunal careers: Senior Researcher/Analyst

The Waitangi Tribunal, based in Wellington, New Zealand is currently advertising a Senior Researcher/Analyst role in the Research Services team.

Applications are encouraged from those with broad and in-depth professional and intellectual knowledge of research methodology and a proven track record of delivering complex research assignments. Strong analytical skills and knowledge of, and expertise in, New Zealand history, public policy or law will also be advantageous.

Applications close 15 February, 2019.

For more information see the Ministry of Justice website: https://apply.justice.govt.nz/jobtools/jncustomsearch.viewFullSingle?in_organid=18808&in_jnCounter=223545794

Sydney Medieval and Renaissance Group reception and book launch

Attendees at ANZAMEMS 2019 are invited to an end-of-conference reception hosted by the Sydney Medieval and Renaissance Group.

Launch: AEMA member Sharon Davidson launches her book on the history of the Sydney Medieval and Renaissance Group
Host: John Ward

Medieval nibbles, inspired by recipes in Lorna Sass’ cookbook To the King’s Taste, will be served along with a selection of drinks including Hippocras.

Friday 8 February, 6-7pm
MacLaurin Hall, Quadrangle Building
University of Sydney

Royal Studies Journal 2019 Book and Article Prizes

Entries are now open for the Royal Studies Journal (RSJ) 2019 Annual Book and Early Career/Post-Graduate Researcher’s Article Prizes.

Book Prize

Launched in June 2015, the Royal Studies Journal Annual Book Prize recognizes
outstanding contributions to the field of royal studies. Authors, publishers, Royal Studies Network (RSN) members, or other interested parties may nominate books, either monographs or edited collections, published during the previous two calendar years (2017-18). Self-nomination is accepted.

Entries must be submitted by 1 March, 2019.

For more information and to register a nomination, go to https://www.rsj.winchester.ac.uk/about/prizes/ and https://royalstudiesjournal.wordpress.com/2018/07/17/cccu-prizes-2018

Early Career Researcher/Post-Graduate Annual Article Prize

Launched in June 2015, the RSJ Early Career and Post-Graduate Researcher’s prize is
awarded annually to a current Early Career or Post-Graduate Researcher for the best
published or unpublished scholarly article-length work (approx. 5,000-10,000 words)
based on original research on any topic that falls within the scope of royal studies.

Contributions are accepted on a year-round basis, with a submission deadline of 1 March, 2019 for inclusion in the current year’s prize campaign. Articles (approx. 5,000-10,000
words) should be submitted in electronic form.

For more information go to https://www.rsj.winchester.ac.uk/about/prizes/ and
https://royalstudiesjournal.wordpress.com/2018/07/17/cccu-prizes-2018/

CPF 2021World Shakespeare Congress, Singapore

The Programme Committee of the 2021 World Shakespeare Congress welcomes proposals for panels, roundtables, seminars, and workshops responding to the conference theme ‘Shakespeare Circuits’.

The trope of circuits draws attention to the passage of Shakespeare’s work between places and periods, agencies and institutions, positionalities and networks of production, languages and mediums. Topics may include, but are not restricted to:

  • Renaissance circuits: socio-cultural economies, ecologies, and performance practices
  • Transmissions: textual transfer, translation, intermediaries
  • Colonial and postcolonial Shakespeares and their intertwining
  • Shakespeare in virtual networks, computing, and the digital humanities
  • Intercultural, transnational, diasporic engagements
  • Media, intermedial and cross-platform circulations
  • Relationships among performances and texts over four centuries of afterlives
  • Tracking and tracing: quotation, allusion, echo, revision, reference
  • Circulations of identity and difference within or between plays and their appropriations
  • Failures, distortions and blockages in transmission
  • Nodal points and their relations: festivals, centres, exhibitions, venues, and archives
  • Relations conducted via Shakespeare among broader historical events, eras, or period

All proposals must be submitted to http://wsc2021.org
The deadline for all proposals is 1 July 2019.

Please see the guidelines (downloadable PDF) for full details on submitting programme proposals.

Registration open for Complaint and Grievance: Literary Traditions Symposium, Wellington, 14-15 February

This two-day symposium explores the literature of complaint and grievance, centring on the texts of the Renaissance but welcoming contributions from related areas. Shakespeare (A Lover’s Complaint) and Spenser (Complaints) are central authors of Renaissance complaint, but who else wrote complaint literature, why, and to what effect? Female-voiced complaint was fashionable in the high poetic culture of the 1590s, but what happens to complaint when it is taken up by early modern women writers? What forms—and what purposes—does the literature of complaint and grievance take on in non-elite or manuscript spheres, in miscellanies, commonplace books, petitions, street satires, ballads and songs? What are the classical and biblical traditions on which Renaissance complaint is based? And what happens to complaint after the Renaissance, in Romantic poetry, in the reading and writing cultures of the British colonial world, in contemporary poetry, and in the #metoo movement?

Keynotes

  • Professor Danielle Clarke (University College Dublin)
  • Professor Kate Lilley (University of Sydney)
  • Professor Rosalind Smith (University of Newcastle, Australia)

Venue

Rutherford House
Victoria University of Wellington Pipitea Campus, Bunny Street
Wellington, New Zealand.

Registration

Symposium attendance is free. For catering purposes, please register your attendance by Friday 8 February with the convenor, Dr Sarah Ross: Sarah.Ross@vuw.ac.nz

For more information, see the full draft programme downloadable here.

CFP Limina conference, UWA July 2019

The call for papers is now open for the 14th annual Limina conference, which will be held at the University of Western Australia on 18-19 July 2019. The theme of this interdisciplinary conference is ‘HUMANIFESTO: Dissecting the Human Experience’. We invite submissions for 20 minute presentations for any topic relating to the intersection of the physical body and the expression of humanity. 

Topics may include (but are not limited to):

– performing bodies / body as spectacle / body art

– social / cultural / political expectations

– identity: race, religion, gender, age, sexuality

– augmented reality / artificial intelligence / genetic manipulation

– rights and rituals / funerary practices

– dysmorphia / alienation

– unembodiment / ghosts / haunting / manifestations

– dehumanisation / othering / objectification

– medicine / public health

– sport / human achievement

Please send submissions with the subject line ‘Humanifesto 2019’ to liminajournal@gmail.com, including a title, abstract (200 words), and short biography (50 words) in a single document.

Deadline for submission is 31 March, 2019.

ANZAMEMS 2019: Register now for special events

If you are joining us for ANZAMEMS 2019 at the University of Sydney next week, please take a few minutes to check the website for a range of special events the conference team has planned. These include:

Manuscript/Early Book Tour of the State Library of New South Wales

Tuesday 5 February, 2:30-4pm 

Join curators from the State Library of New South Wales for a tour of the library, which can trace its history back to 1826. The tour will provide an overview of the different reading rooms in the Library and some of the beautiful spaces and exhibitions in its historic Mitchell Wing. The tour will also include a private viewing of some Renaissance treasures from the Library’s rich and varied collections.

Free, but please register through this EventBrite link

Postgraduate Reception: Let’s Meet and Eat

Thursday 7 February, 6-7pm, Courtyard Restaurant and Bar at the University of Sydney

Per ANZAMEMS conference tradition, the current Postgraduate Representatives to the Executive Committee (Lisa Rolston and Hannah Skipworth) will hold a reception for ANZAMEMS postgraduates. The ambition behind this year’s event is to provide postgraduates with an opportunity to meet their peers from around Australia and New Zealand and establish connections that will carry them into future endeavours. Honours students and ECRs are most welcome to attend.

Free. Please register through this EventBrite link.

Treasures of the Fisher Library

The librarians of the Rare Books and Special Collections in the Fisher Library at the University of Sydney have generously arranged to show some treasures of the library to conference attendees at a number of scheduled times during the conference. The books include manuscripts and early printed books generally related to the conference theme. The numbers in these sessions will be capped so that visitors can examine the books and talk with the librarians about them.

A range of timeslots are available throughout the conference (5-8 February). Please see the ANZAMEMS 2019 conference website to check times and register.

Other special events include a screening of the film The Devil’s Country, a documentary that explores the intersection of the medieval demonic, the colonial experience of the Australian landscape, and the Indigenous experience of invasion and westward expansion through NSW.

There will also be a concert by The Marais Project. This group, founded in 2000 by viola da gambist, Jennifer Eriksson, focuses on the music of the baroque era with a particular emphasis on the works of Marin Marais, a performer and composer at the Court of Louis XIV.

CFP AEMA 14 – Legitimacy and Illegitimacy

This conference of the Australian Early Medieval Association invites papers on the broad theme of legitimacy. In a modern world dominated by deeply polemical counter narratives not afraid to adjust facts to claim dominance and, thereby, legitimacy, we look at the ways in which modern forms of the pursuit of legitimacy evolved in the early Middle Ages. Legitimacy can have several meanings, covering aspects of authenticity, legality, validity, and conformity. While it literally refers to something that meets the requirements of the law, this legal aspect is not inherent: something can be legitimate without being legal, or be legal without being legitimate.

In the context of the early medieval period, who legitimated? What was their reasons for doing so? Conversely, what was set aside in the process of illegitimisation? And what do these dominant and counter narratives mean for the presentation of history? 

Legitimacy implies dominant views on authority, cultural legitimacy, status, and control of the means to ensure dominance, such as publication. It can create hidden communities and counter-narratives. Even though the early medieval period continues to exist in the popular imagination as backward and insular, in many ways it is a period marked by innovations in both the practice and pursuit of legitimacy, innovations which still resonate to this day. This conference aims to challenge the perception that the modern world is particularly modern in the way it contests legitimacy. 

We invite submissions on the following topics: 

·        Politics and Culture

·        Individuals and Institutions

·        Law and Justice 

·        Status and Inheritance

·        Authenticity and Fraud

·        Orthodoxy and Heresy

·        Truth and Propaganda 

·        Dominant and Counter Narratives

·        Objects and Spaces

·        Modern (re)interpretations of the Early Medieval 

AEMA also welcomes papers concerned with all aspects of the Early Medieval period (c. 400–1150) in all cultural, geographic, religious and linguistic settings, even if they do not strictly adhere to the theme. We especially encourage submissions from graduate students and early career researchers.

Abstracts of 250-300 words for 20-minute papers should be submitted via email to conference@aema.net.au by 5 April 2019.

Limited financial assistance is available to AEMA members on acceptance – please direct all enquiries the conference committee.

Shakespeare in Italy Summer School, Florence, July 6-19

Shakespeare in Italy’s 5th summer school is to be held this year at the British Institute in Florence from July 6 – 19. The summer school gives participants the rare opportunity to work with tutors who are leaders in their field in the UK theatre world. Royal Shakespeare Company and Globe directors Lucy Bailey and Chris Luscombe will lead work on Julius Caesar and Romeo and Juliet and acclaimed actor/director Philip Franks on The Two Gentlemen of Verona.

Our course is practical, not academic, and it is open to all, the only proviso being that you speak English fluently. Last year in Pizzo Calabro the group ranged in age from 18 to 95. Everyone took part in putting scenes on their feet but in past years some people have wanted to participate from the comfort of their seats. Both approaches are welcome! 

The benefits are innumerable and people have a lot of fun as well as gaining great theatrical insight into the texts. Please see the PDF below for more details and contact shakespeareinitaly.eu@gmail.com with any questions.

A 5 per cent Early Bird discount on all bookings received with €400.00 deposit before February 15.

www.shakespeareinitaly.eu or phone +44 (0) 1273 285377 or +44 (0) 7493757302