Call for applications for Professional Teaching Fellow AND Postdoctoral Fellowship

Call for applications for Professional Teaching Fellow AND Postdoctoral Fellowship

Please indicate clearly whether you are applying for one or both of these positions. Depending on the candidate/s appointed, they have the potential to be held separately or concurrently.

Professional Teaching Fellow

The School of Humanities at the University of Auckland invites applications for three-year fixed-term part-time position (0.5) as a Professional Teaching Fellow in Classics and Ancient History, commencing in February 2018. The successful candidate will be expected to deliver undergraduate courses in Latin and Ancient History.

Candidates should have a completed or nearly completed PhD in a relevant subject area. The candidate will be primarily tasked with Latin language teaching at the undergraduate level. This will include aspects of the acquisition sequences as well as some upper level literature papers. The position also offers the opportunity to engage in the teaching of undergraduate history/culture courses and may include some postgraduate teaching and/or supervision. Experience with first-generation students and students from a range of ethnic backgrounds is highly desirable.

The University of Auckland is home to the leading and most comprehensive Arts Faculty in New Zealand. It is ranked 25 in the QS World University Rankings by Faculty for 2017. The School of Humanities, comprising the disciplines of Art History, Classics and Ancient History, English and Drama, History, Philosophy and Theological and Religious Studies, constitutes the largest concentration of Humanities scholars in the nation and ranks first nationally in all of the QS subjects if offers.

Applicants should submit a letter of application, curriculum vitae and the names and contact details of two referees to Head of the School of Humanities, Associate Professor Malcolm Campbell, mc.campbell@auckland.ac.nz by Wednesday 6 December.

Inquiries about this position should also be directed to the Head of the School.

Postdoctoral fellowship

The research project ‘Servants of God, Slaves of the Church: Rhetoric and Realities of Service in Early Medieval Europe’ is now advertising for a postdoctoral fellowship which can commence as soon as March 2018, although start time is flexible. This fellowship is structured as a three-year 0.5 role, but could potentially be held full time over 18 months by negotiation. It will be based at the School of Humanities in the University of Auckland, New Zealand.

Funded by a Royal Society of New Zealand Marsden grant (Principal Investigator (PI): Assoc. Prof. Lisa Bailey), this project explores how kings, queens, and other high status Christians in early medieval Europe used the image of slavery to describe and enact their relationship with God, while surrounded by servants and slaves who kept them fed, kept churches clean, and kept religious institutions running. These servants and slaves were thus also servants of God, and the people of early medieval Europe understood the labour they performed for the sake of religion as special and elevated. The aim of the research is to scrutinise the connections between these different ways of serving God in western Europe between the end of the Roman empire and the beginnings of the medieval kingdoms (c. 400 – 900 CE). It details how the realities of service shaped the rhetoric of serving God, while the symbolic service which honoured God also ennobled the service performed by low-status people in churches and religious households.

The geographical focus of the PI’s research will be on Gaul, Germany, Italy, and Northern Europe. The work of the postdoctoral scholar should spread this geographical basis further, so that the project can include detailed analysis of regional patterns or variations. The postdoctoral scholar should therefore have the expertise to work on a region which will not be covered in the PI’s research and will be expected to work towards a co-publication with the PI.

If the position is held part-time, there may also be the opportunity to undertake some undergraduate or postgraduate teaching for additional remuneration.

The University of Auckland is home to the leading and most comprehensive Arts Faculty in New Zealand. It is ranked 25 in the QS World University Rankings by Faculty for 2017. The School of Humanities, comprising the disciplines of Art History, Classics and Ancient History, English and Drama, History, Philosophy and Theological and Religious Studies, constitutes the largest concentration of Humanities scholars in the nation and ranks first nationally in all of the QS subjects if offers.

Applicants should have a completed or nearly completed PhD in a relevant subject area and should submit a letter of application, curriculum vitae and the names and contact details of two referees to Assoc. Prof. Lisa Bailey (lk.bailey@auckland.ac.nz). Inquiries about this position should also be directed to this email address. Review of applications will begin on 6 December 2017.

European Academy of Religion First Annual Conference – Call for Papers

EUROPEAN ACADEMY OF RELIGION FIRST ANNUAL CONFERENCE BOLOGNA, MARCH 5-8, 2018

The European Academy of Religion (EuARe) is a new constellation in
European scholarship which was established in 2016 with the support of
the European parliament. It aims to create an inclusive network, to
act as an open platform, and to provide a framework to foster
research, communication, exchange and cooperation concerning important
religious issues for the academic world and society at large.

The program of the EuARe Conference 2018 will be composed of plenary
(lectiones magistrales and roundtables) and working sessions (panels
and papers).

On Tuesday 6th and Wednesday 7th, the Conference will host an
international Moot Court Competition in Law & Religion, organized in
cooperation with ICLARS – International Consortium for Law & Religion
Studies.

In the location of the event, a display space reserved for publishers
will be set up. Publishers are invited to organize book presentations
with authors and to advertise their participation on their websites
and in newsletters in order to draw public attention to their works
and encourage attendance.

The Call  has been recently published on the EuARe
website: there you will find all the information you need about the
Conference program and your participation (deadlines, registration
fees, travel grants and accommodation). https://www.europeanacademyofreligion.org/general-information

If you wish to contribute to the Conference by convening a panel or
applying for a single paper, we remind you that the deadline for
proposal submission is Wednesday, December 20th (submission forms can
be found here: https://www.europeanacademyofreligion.org/program).
Registrations to the Conference, instead, will be open until Friday,
February 16th
(https://www.europeanacademyofreligion.org/registration).
Early rates for registration will be available until December 20th
(early bird) and February 16th (regular). After this date only on-site
registration will be possible.

We also remind you that, starting this year, the EuARe will be
granting memberships.
Members will have the benefits of discounted conference rates and will
be invited to join and participate in the next General Assembly, which
will meet on Tuesday 6th of March.
The Call will also give you more detailed information about the
membership rates and the General Assembly.
Membership application forms are available here:
https://www.europeanacademyofreligion.org/membership

 

 

 

European Academy of Religion

Public Lecture by Prof. Lyndal Roper at The University of Melbourne

‘Luther and Dreams’

A public lecture by Prof. Lyndal Roper (University of Oxford) at The University of Melbourne.

Date: Monday 4 December 2017

Time: 6.15–7.30pm

Room 153 (Forum Theatre)

Level 1, Arts West North Wing

The University of Melbourne

Parkville VIC 301

Registrations: http://alumni.online.unimelb.edu.au/lutheranddreams

Information: http://www.historyofemotions.org.au/events/luther-and-dreams/

Enquiries: che-melb-admin@unimelb.edu.au

This lecture marks the 1517–2017 quincentenary of the European Reformation, set in motion by Martin Luther in the German university town of Wittenberg.

Luther regularly labelled superstition, Catholic dogma, and the beliefs of the Turks and the Jews, as ‘dreams’. ‘Lauter somnia’, pure dreams, was one of his favourite insults, and he liked nothing better than to debunk them. Yet Luther was also fascinated by signs and portents, and though he often joked about dreams, he too noted important dreams. Dreams also happened to be recorded at key turning points of the Reformation, and they give rare insight into Luther’s deepest anxieties and feelings. Discussed collectively, Luther and his followers used dream interpretations to communicate concerns they did not discuss explicitly. This lecture explores how historians can make use of dreams to understand the subjectivity of people in the past.

The lecture is co-hosted by the History Discipline of The University of Melbourne.

Professor Lyndal Roper is Regius Professor of History, Oriel College, University of Oxford, and one of the world’s most renowned historians of early modern times. She is the first woman, and the first Australian, to hold the Regius Chair, and in 2016 she received the prestigious Gerda Henkel prize for her ‘trailblazing’ work on social, gender, and psychological history in the age of the Reformation. Her latest book, Martin Luther: Renegade and Prophet (Random House, 2017), is the first historical biography of Luther to be published in English for many decades. She is now writing a history of the German Peasants’ War (1524–1525), the greatest uprising in Western Europe before the French Revolution. Professor Roper is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Australian Academy of the Humanities, and the Brandenburg Akademie der Wissenschaften; she is also a member of the International Advisory Board of the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions.

 

AHA2018: The Scale of History – Call for papers

 

AHA2018: The Scale of History

Call for papers

Historians make choices about the scale of their inquiry. They set parameters for their projects – temporal, geographical, social, archival – which shape their research strategies, their potential audiences, and their interpretations and arguments. Do you write history on a grand or intimate scale? Or both? We welcome paper and panel proposals on any geographical area, time period, or field of history, especially those relating to the theme of scale.

The Australian Historical Association 2018 Conference will be held Monday 2 – Friday 6 July 2018, at The Australian National University, Canberra.

The full call for papers, and a pdf file of it for print purposes, is available on the conference website: http://history.cass.anu.edu.au/aha2018

CFP deadline: Wednesday 28 February 2018

 

Australian Historical Association Annual Conference 2018 – Call for Papers

Australian Historical Association Annual Conference 2018 – Call for Papers

Historians make choices about the scale of their inquiry. They set parameters for their projects – temporal, geographical, social, archival – which shape their research strategies, their potential audiences, and their interpretations and arguments.

We engage with scale in a variety of ways, including: big history, microhistory, global history, local history, deep history, planetary history, biography, emotions, digital history and big data, and document analysis.

Do you write history on a grand or intimate scale? Or both?

Join us at the 2018 AHA conference in Canberra to ponder these questions and more! We welcome paper and panel proposals on any geographical area, time period, or field of history, especially those relating to the theme of scale.

Reflecting the location of the conference in Canberra, we also invite papers on the theme History and the National Cultural Collections which promote engagement between historians and professionals in the GLAMs sector (galleries, libraries, archives, museums).

As is customary, AHA members and affiliated societies will organise various specialised streams. Check the conference website for further updates. http://history.cass.anu.edu.au/aha2018

Confirmed keynote speakers

Professor Clare Anderson University of Leicester

Professor Mark McKenna University of Sydney

Professor Lynette Russell Monash University (AHA presidential address)

 
Online submission of abstracts
Online submission of abstracts will open in November 2017 and close 28 February 2018.
 

Contacts
Convenor: Dr Samuel Furphy (ANU)
Administrator: Dr Karen Downing
Email: aha2018@anu.edu.au
Twitter: #OzHA2018
 

The lady and the unicorn exhibition

A rare opportunity to experience the beauty, scale and intricacy of a masterpiece of medieval French art that has captivated viewers across the centuries

10 Feb – 24 Jun 2018

Revered as a national treasure in France, and known as the 15th-century ‘Mona Lisa of the Middle Ages’ The lady and the unicorn tapestry cycle will be making its exclusive appearance in Australia at the Art Gallery of NSW through a generous and exceptional loan from the collection of the Musée de Cluny – Musée national du Moyen Âge in Paris.

The six large tapestries each depict a richly costumed lady flanked by that most mysterious animal, the unicorn, with jewel-like millefleur (‘thousand flowers’) backgrounds. The tapestries present a vivid meditation on earthly pleasures and courtly love. They can also be viewed as an allegory of the five senses – sight, hearing, taste, touch and smell – plus a sixth ‘internal’ sense – heart, desire or will – which was widely known at the time.

With an engaging program of events and activities for all ages, and a specially designed digital experience, a visit to The lady and the unicorn will allow a close encounter with one of the world’s greatest treasures.

This exhibition is made possible with the support of the NSW Government through its tourism and major events agency, Destination NSW.

Buy tickets now from Qtix. Tickets can be used once, anytime the exhibition is open. You don’t specify a date or time when booking.

$18 adult
$16 concession
$14 member
$44 family (2 adults + up to 3 children)
$8 child (5-17 years)
Free for children under 5
A $2 transaction fee applies for online purchases

Multi-entry ticket
$29 adult
$26 concession
$23 member
Only available at the Gallery

Location:
Upper Asian gallery

https://www.artgallery.nsw.gov.au/exhibitions/the-lady-and-the-unicorn/

The Canadian Conference of Medieval Art Historians – Call for Papers

The Canadian Conference of Medieval Art Historians Colloque canadien des historiens de l’art du Moyen Âge

Call for Papers/Appel À communications

The 39th annual Canadian Conference of Medieval Art Historians will be hosted by The School for Studies in Art and Culture, Carleton University (Ottawa), March 16-17, 2018. Papers are invited on any topic relating to the art, architecture and visual/material culture of the Middle Ages or its post-medieval revivals. Papers may be in English or French. Please submit a short abstract (250 words) and brief (onepage) C.V. by 11 December 2017 to Peter Coffman (peter.coffman@carleton.ca). Scholars at every stage of their careers are encouraged to submit proposals.

Le 39e Colloque annuel canadien des historiens de l’art médiéval sera organisé par l’École des études en art et culture à l’Université Carleton (Ottawa), du 16 au 17 mars 2018. Les communications sont invitées sur tout sujet relatif à l’art, à l’architecture et à la culture visuelle / matérielle du Moyen Âge ou à ses renaissances post-médiévales. Les interventions peuvent être en anglais ou en français. Veuillez soumettre un court résumé (250 mots) et un bref C.V. (une page) d’ici le 11 décembre 2017 à Peter Coffman (peter.coffman@carleton.ca). Tous les chercheurs et chercheuses qui sont à différentes étapes de leur carrière sont encouragés à participer.

Carleton University, March/Mars 16-17, 2018

peter.coffman@carleton.ca

A World of Empires. Claiming and Assigning Imperial Authority in the High and Late Middle Ages

Recent Publication:

A World of Empires. Claiming and Assigning Imperial Authority in the High and Late Middle Ages

Chris Jones (Canterbury), Klaus Oschema (Ruhr University Bochum) and Christoph Mauntel (University of Tübingen) published the co-edited collection A World of Empires. Claiming and Assigning Imperial Authority in the High and Late Middle Ages as a special issue of The Medieval History Journal (20:2 [2017]). The volume is a collection of seven articles that explore the use of the Latin terms ‘empire’ and ‘emperor’ and their vernacular equivalents in the later medieval centuries. A product, in part, of sessions held at the Leeds International Medieval Congress in 2014, the volume features the work of scholars based in New Zealand, Germany, France and the Netherlands. 

Download (PDF, 570KB)

Theorizing Medieval European Literatures c. 500 – c. 1500 – Call for Submissions

Theorizing Medieval European Literatures
c. 500 – c. 1500
 

Deadline 1 September 2018

Interfaces 7 will address a key, but often simply assumed, aspect of our shared field: what do we mean by Europe when we speak of medieval literature? Most models of medieval literature remain nationally or linguistically based, with modern nations and linguistic experience being projected onto the Middle Ages. In trying to develop European models of medieval literature, it is not enough to stitch together national narratives to create European stories. While fundamental theoretical groundwork has begun, more is required to think in European ways about the literary cultures of the Middle Ages.

Issue No. 7 of Interfaces will take a capacious approach to Europe, identifying it in general geographic terms as Northwest Eurasia. This conceptual geography allows for an integrated study of literary traditions in, for examples, Al-Andalus, Bohemia, Iceland, France, Georgia, the Holy Land, Italy, Kievan Rus, and Mount Athos, without claiming that certain literatures are or are not European. Such a starting point, for example, proposes medieval Europe as a place where Catholic, Orthodox, Muslim, and Jewish religious worldviews met and acknowledges the connection of Europe to other cultural networks in Asia and North Africa.

Interfaces challenges conventional approaches to literary culture which bind it within specific and narrowly defined linguistic, political, geographical, religious, or temporal conceptions of Europe. Examples of cultural phenomena that do not lend themselves to this traditional approach include: the shared Greco-Roman heritage of the Latin West, Byzantium, and Islam; the role of Arabic and Hebrew in the linguistic makeup of Europe; and the shared Byzantine heritage of the Orthodox churches in eastern and southern Europe and the linguistic affinities that connected the Slavs across East-West Christian divide. Likewise, conventional geo-political approaches do not adequately describe Christian textual culture in North Africa and Manichaean networks across Eurasia, and the role of the Silk Route in the exchange of stories and learning in the continuous Afro-Eurasian space.

A sustained interest in Europe, especially one so capaciously defined, is at odds with medieval worldviews and experiences: although the idea of Europe was available in this period, it was rarely highly productive before the fifteenth century and, when used, was often normative or excluding. Concern for Europe is a post-medieval phenomenon, with very particular and swiftly changing contours in the present day. Despite its anachronism, looking at European frameworks for medieval literature brings a number of dividends, not least when drawing large-scale comparisons of European literature with Asian parallels, such as Indian or Chinese. Talking of medieval European literature offers alternatives to nationalizing literary history and enables participation of medieval literary scholars in European studies. Importantly, the study of medieval literature contributes valuable material to wider political and cultural discussions about Europe’s past before the rise of nationalism, and its place in the world.

Modern politics do inform the accounts we give of the Middle Ages and their literary and linguistic heritage. The meeting of modern intellectual and political frameworks and medieval texts needs to be scrutinized in order for such intersections to be constructive for literary study. Such scrutiny recognizes that no definition or description of Europe, whether in the present or the past, is neutral. A capacious Europe can be viewed as hegemonic (that is claiming for Europe what is shared with or borrowed from others) while a narrow Europe can be viewed as exclusive: these pressure points are politically urgent and sensitive, particularly in the context of the legacy of colonialism, the expansion of the EU, migration, Brexit, racist appropriation of the Middle Ages, the rise of neo-nationalism, questions about a Europe of multiple confessions, and globalization. Thus this issue of Interfaceswill take a broad view of European literary cultures and their wider regional and global connections in the Middle Ages as its object of study, without taking Europe as a self-evident frame of reference.The aim will be to explore the literary cultures of medieval Europe and their place in a wider world, while also interrogating the nature and value of Europe as a framework for the study of medieval literature.

Theoretical questions which contributors are invited to consider in Interfaces 7 include:

  • What does literary study let us see about medieval Europe that is distinctive from other disciplines and objects of study?
  • What are the methodologies for the study of medieval European literatures (comparative, entangled, regional, postcolonial, race studies)?
  • What models are available for the study of medieval European literature? (e.g. cultural, confessional, linguistic, geographical, imperial, focusing on dynasties, networks, itineraries, mobilities, waterways). What’s at stake in different models of Europe? Can other non-nationalizing frames enrich Europe as a working concept? How do ideas of Europe intersect with experiences of gender and sexuality?
  • What can European perspectives enable us to see about medieval literature (interconnections, the place of smaller literatures, etc.)? What can European perspectives obscure or occlude (emergent national sentiment, debt to areas beyond Europe)?
  • How does medieval European literature relate to national and global literary history?
  • How is medieval European literary history told outside of Europe – in the Americas and Asia, for example?
  • What do different national and regional (Byzantine, Central European, Western European, Eastern European, Iberian, Mediterranean, etc.) traditions of studying medieval literature have to teach each other? Can nationalizing and non-nationalizing approaches ignore the unifying nature of Europe as a common literary stage?
  • Is the concept of Europe being used in literary histories in two different ways – one from the inside and one from half-way outside? From many regions of literary study, “Europe” is seen as the, partly, other from which impulses come (e.g. Iberia, Iceland, England, Bohemia, Byzantium); are there also core regions of Europe which don’t other Europe, and consequently don’t thematize it either?
  • What commonalities and paradigms in the wide range of medieval literary traditions and encounters that existed on the European continent create the perception of a shared literary history?
  • How do modern politics shape narratives of medieval literature, and how do these reflect different understanding of what “Europe” is across western, central, and eastern Europe and outside of European continent?
  • How do ideas of Europe inform and challenge our teaching strategies, translation projects, collaborations, writing of literary history, public engagement, and interaction with modern literature and with other disciplines?

Interfaces is a fully open access, peer reviewed, online journal, published by the University of Milanis association with the Centre for Medieval Literature at the University of Southern Denmark and the University of York.

Interfaces is indexed by DOAJ – The Directory of Open Access Journals and ERIH PLUS – The European Reference Index for the Humanities and the Social Sciences. It is registered for regular aggregation and indexing in OpenAIRE.

Interfaces invites papers in English, French, German, Italian, or Spanish.

Any enquiries can be directed to the editors at: interfaces@unimi.it

Paolo Borsa, Christian Høgel, Lars Boje Mortensen and Elizabeth Tyler (editors)

https://riviste.unimi.it/interfaces/pages/view/cfp_theorizing_medieval_european_literatures

Hobart Summer Schools 2018

HOBART SUMMER SCHOOLS 2018

SUMMER SCHOOL IN LATIN

Intensive reading course in Medieval and Ecclesiastical Latin.  This will be the 25th annual Hobart Latin Summer School!  It is now taught under the auspices of the Christopher Dawson Centre.  Some prior knowledge of Latin is a prerequisite, though a person with some background in another language can readily come up to the starting gate.  Readings from some of the great and influential literature, poetry and prose, from antiquity to the dawn of the modern world.

Hobart (venue to be determined, but a central location)

22-26 January 2018

9.00 am to 3.00 pm daily for five days

SUMMER SCHOOL IN NEW TESTAMENT GREEK

In association with the Verbum Domini Institute, this is an intensive course in the koine Greek of the New Testament, a continuation of last summer’s course that is also suitable for virtual beginners who are willing to undertake some preliminary work on the Greek alphabet.  We shall read passages from the Gospels and from Christian literature of the apostolic age. 

Hobart, 35 Tower Road, New Town

29 January to 2 February 2018

9.00 am to 3.00 pm daily for five days

Please contact David Daintree directly – dccdain@gmail.com – for further information about either of these two courses.