Category Archives: ANZAMEMS

Member research profile: Dr Julie Davies, Science in an Enchanted World

In a new feature, the ANZAMEMS newsletter is taking the opportunity to highlight the research of some of our members. Dr Julie Davies recently published her book Science in an Enchanted World: Philosophy and Witchcraft in the Work of Joseph Glanvill (Routledge, 2018). She tells us more about her book and what she is working on now…

Dr Julie Davies - photo

Dr Julie Davies

I work primarily on the intellectual history of medieval and early modern Europe. I am motivated by an interest in cosmologies: the way societies have understood how the world works and the role humankind has within in the universe. My research interests include demonology, witchcraft, science and experimental philosophy, theology, metaphysics, mythology and the supernatural. I received my doctorate from the University of Melbourne and am currently research assistant to Charles Zika at the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions at the University of Melbourne. I am also the announcements editor for the International Society for Intellectual History.

Glanvill is well known in the history of both witchcraft and the Royal Society of London. He was, after all, friends with notable figures like Henry More, Robert Boyle and Richard Baxter. However, few scholars have attempted a comprehensive investigation into Glanvill’s eclectic body of work. Science in an Enchanted World: Philosophy and Witchcraft in the Work of Joseph Glanvill is an exploration of the relationship between Glanvill’s work on witchcraft, the Saducismus triumphatus, and the ideas he presented in his well-regarded works on the experimental method of the Royal Society, metaphysics, theology and pastoral care. The result is a multidisciplinary work that offers a unifying perspective on Glanvill’s diverse works and a resource to help future scholars navigate through the multiple editions and versions of Glanvill’s complex corpus.

In current research I am looking at remedies for melancholy and am heading to the Herzog August Bibliothek in early 2019 to compare the work and motivations of some early English and German female botanists. This kicks off my next big project on the place of horticulture, herbalism and botany in the lives of European women. I’m also particularly interested in when scientific and religious practices were recommended as paths towards emotional well-being.

My other recent publications include a collection edited with Michael Pickering A World Enchanted: Magic and the Margins (2014), “Botanizing at Badminton House: The Botanical Pursuits of Mary Somerset, First Duchess of Beaufort” in Domesticity in the Making of Modern Science, edited by Donald Opitz, Brigitte van Tiggelen and Staffan Bergwik (2015) and “German Receptions of the Works of Joseph Glanvill: Philosophical Transmissions from England to Germany in the Late Seventeenth and Early Eighteenth Century” in Intellectual History Review (2016).

You can find Julie on Twitter @JulieD1680 and on Academia.edu at https://unimelb.academia.edu/JulieDavies

ANZAMEMS members who would like to profile their recent book-length publications via the newsletter should contact the editor, amanda.mcvitty@gmail.com. We particularly encourage early career scholars and those with first books to get in touch.

 

Parergon call for proposals: Special themed issues

The ANZAMEMS’ journal Parergon (https://parergon.org/) produces one open issue and one themed issue annually. We now call for proposals for future themed issues, specifically for 2021 (38.2)

Recent themed issues include: 

  • 2016, 33.2 Approaches to Early Modern Nostalgia, guest-edited by Kristine Johanson
  • 2017, 34.2 Exile and Imprisonment in Medieval and Early Modern Europe, guest-edited by Lisa Di Crescenzo and Sally Fisher
  • 2018, 35.2 Translating Medieval Cultures Across Time and Place: A Global Perspective, guest-edited by Saher Amer, Esther S. Klein, and Hélène Sirantoine

Parergon publishes articles on all aspects of medieval and early modern studies, from early medieval through to the eighteenth century, and including the reception and influence of medieval and early modern culture in the modern world. We are particularly interested in research that takes new approaches and crosses traditional disciplinary boundaries.

Parergon asks its authors to achieve international standards of excellence. The article should be substantially original, advance research in the field, and have the potential to make a significant contribution to the critical debate.

Parergon is available in electronic form as part of Project Muse, Australian Public Affairs – Full Text (from 1994), and Humanities Full Text (from 2008). Parergon is included in the Clarivate Analytics Master Journal List of refereed journals and in the European Reference Index for the Humanities (ERIH), and is indexed for nine major database services, including ABELL, IMB and Scopus. 

Themed issues contain up to ten essays, plus the usual reviews section. The guest editor is responsible for setting the theme and drawing up the criteria for the essays. 

Time line 

Proposals for the 2021 issue (38.2) should be submitted to the Editor susan.broomhall@uwa.edu.au by Friday 1 February 2019.

Proposals should contain the following: 

  1. A draft title for the issue.
  2. A statement outlining the rationale for the issue.
  3. Titles and abstracts of all the essays.
  4. A short biographical paragraph for the guest editor(s) and for each contributor.

Proposals will be considered by a selection panel drawn from the Parergon International Editorial Board who will be asked to assess and rank the proposals according to the following criteria:

  1. Suitability for the journal
  2. Originality of contribution to the chosen field
  3. Significance/importance of the proposed theme
  4. Potential for advancing scholarship in a new and exciting way
  5. Range and quality of authors

Guest editors will be notified of the result of their application by the beginning of April 2019. 

The editorial process 

Once a proposal has been accepted: 

  1. The guest editor will commission and pre-select the essays before submitting them to the Parergon Editor by the agreed date (for issue 38.2, 1 June 2020).
  2. The Parergon Editor will arrange for independent and anonymous peer-review in accordance with the journal’s established criteria.
  3. Occasionally a commissioned essay will be judged not suitable for publication in Parergon. This decision will be taken by the Parergon Editor, based on the anonymous expert reviews.
  4. Essays that have already been published or accepted for publication elsewhere are not eligible for inclusion in the journal.

Please send enquiries and proposals to the Editor, Susan Broomhall, at susan.broomhall@uwa.edu.au

Download (PDF, 214KB)

 

ANZAMEMS Executive Committee statement on funding processes

The Executive Committee of ANZAMEMS joins colleagues in other scholarly associations in expressing our conviction that processes related to the awarding of research funds should be transparent, procedurally fair, and supportive of robust independent peer review.

ANZAMEMS’ mission is “to promote and foster all aspects of Medieval, Renaissance, and Early Modern Studies in Australia and New Zealand, and to establish and nurture productive professional friendships between scholars working in these areas”. Articulating the value of humanities research and preserving the integrity of academic peer review are integral aspects of that mission.

ANZAMEMS members have been among the recipients of ARC Discovery Project, DECRA and Future Fellow awards, and this support has been invaluable in helping them to generate research outcomes with significant international impact. Association members also act as expert assessors in this and other funding schemes, and we hold their expertise and judgement in high esteem.

As a Committee, we express our hope that recent experience encourages all funding bodies to ensure their processes are robust and transparent, support the integrity of independent peer review, and uphold principles of equity and procedural fairness.

Dr Chris Jones
President, Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval & Early Modern Studies Inc.
on behalf of the ANZAMEMS Executive Committee

Parergon 35.2 is out! Translating medieval cultures across time and place

The latest issue of the ANZAMEMS journal Parergon is now out. This is an exciting interdisciplinary special issue on Translating Medieval Cultures Across Time and Place: A Global Perspective, guest edited by Saher Amer, Esther S. Klein, and Hélène Sirantoine. Parergon 35.1 features seven original research articles and a scholarly introduction, along with our usual wide selection of book reviews and short notices.

ANZAMEMS members and Parergon subscribers will be receiving their print copies in the post soon. You can also access Parergon content via Project MUSE. For further information on accessing Parergon or submitting articles for consideration, visit Parergon.

Here is a preview of the contents of Parergon 35.2:

‘Introduction: Translating Medieval Cultures Across Time and Place: A Global Perspective’
Saher Amer, Esther S. Klein, and Hélène Sirantoine

  1. The Politics of Translation: Knowledge, Dominance, and Interimperial Economies

‘Shahrazad’s 1001 Meditations: Translations in the Inter-Imperial Economy’
Laura Doyle

‘Spiegelungen in Daṇḍin’s Mirror: A Comparative Pursuit in the Translatability of Narrative Modes, Historicity, Prose, and Vernacularism across French and Asian Medieval Historiography’
Ulrich Timme Kragh

‘The Limits of Ongietenisse: Translating Global Imagination in the Old English Letter of Alexander to Aristotle’
Kate Perillo

‘Spreading the Word of Zhu Xi: Xu Heng’s Vernacular Confucianism under Mongol Rule and Beyond’
Esther S. Klein

  1. Cultural Exchange, Identity, and The Promise of New Technologies

‘Histories of the Islamic World in the Chronicles of the Kingdom of Léon (End-Ninth to Mid-Twelfth Centuries)’
Hélène Sirantoine

‘Itz and the Descent of Kukulkan: Central Mexican Influence on Postclassic Maya Thought’
Alexus McLeod

‘Teaching the Global Middle Ages through Technology’
Sahar Amer and Lynn Ramey

ANZAMEMS 2019: CFP deadline extended to 15 September

The deadline to submit paper abstracts and panel/roundtable proposals for the ANZAMEMS 2019 Conference (5-8 February 2019 in Sydney, Australia) has been extended until Friday, 15 September.

The theme for ANZAMEMS 2019 is Categories, Boundaries, Horizons. Categories and boundaries help us to define our fields of knowledge and subjects of inquiry, but can also contain and limit our perspectives. The concept of category emerges etymologically from the experience of speaking in an assembly, a dialogic forum in which new ways of explaining can emerge. Boundaries and horizons are intertwined in their meanings, pointing to the limits of subjectivity, and inviting investigation beyond current understanding into new ways of connecting experience and knowledge.

Papers, panels, and streams are invited to explore all aspects of this theme, including, but not limited to:

  • the limitations of inherited categorization and definition
  • race, gender, class, and dis/ability boundaries and categories
  • encounters across boundaries, through material, cultural, and social exchange
  • the categorization of the human and animal
  • national and religious boundaries and categorization
  • the role of interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary research
  • temporal boundaries and categories, including questions of periodization

Proposals for papers on all aspects of the medieval and early modern are also welcome.

For more information and to submit a proposal, visit the website here:
https://anzamemsconference2019.wordpress.com/call-for-papers/

Applicants for Travel Bursaries and the George Yule Prize should apply by 30 September 2018. for more information, see https://anzamemsconference2019.wordpress.com/bursaries-prizes/

ANZAMEMS publication prizes and conference travel bursaries close soon

A reminder to all ANZAMEMS members that 30 September is the closing deadline for applications for the ANZAMEMS publication prizes and for postgraduate/ECR travel bursaries to attend the ANZAMEMS 2019 conference (Sydney, Australia 5-8 February 2019).

Postgraduate Student & ECR Travel Bursary, Kim Walker Postgraduate Travel Bursary and George Yule Prize Applications

Travel bursaries and prizes enable current or recent postgraduates who are currently unwaged to attend the ANZAMEMS Biennial Conference and deliver a paper at a session. Postgraduate and Early Career Scholars wishing to apply should see the eligibility requirements and apply at: https://anzamemsconference2019.wordpress.com/bursaries-prizes/

Patricia Crawford Postgraduate Publication Prize

The Patricia Crawford Postgraduate Publication Prize is awarded to a postgraduate student for the best article-length scholarly work in any discipline/topic falling within the scope of medieval and early modern studies, published within the previous two years. The winner will be announced at the ANZAMEMS 2019 conference.

For more information and to submit an application see: https://anzamems.org/?page_id=8#PC

Philippa Maddern ECR Publication Prize

The Philippa Maddern ECR Publication Prize is awarded to an Early Career Researcher (ECR) for the best article-length scholarly work in any discipline/topic falling within the scope of medieval and early modern studies, published within the previous two years. The winner will be announced at the ANZAMEMS 2019 conference.

For more information and to submit an application see: https://anzamems.org/?page_id=8#PM

ANZAMEMS 2019: Closing dates approaching for CFP, bursaries and prizes, PATS

The Committee of the ANZAMEMS 2019 Conference (5-8 February 2019 in Sydney, Australia) invites paper and panel proposals, PATS expressions of interest, and bursary and prize applications to be made by the following dates:

Call for Papers Deadline: 31 August 2018

Travel Bursary and George Yule Prize Application Deadline: 30 September 2018

Postgraduate Advanced Training Seminars Application Deadline: 31 August 2018

Call for Papers and Panels

The theme for ANZAMEMS 2019 is Categories, Boundaries, Horizons. Categories and boundaries help us to define our fields of knowledge and subjects of inquiry, but can also contain and limit our perspectives. The concept of category emerges etymologically from the experience of speaking in an assembly, a dialogic forum in which new ways of explaining can emerge. Boundaries and horizons are intertwined in their meanings, pointing to the limits of subjectivity, and inviting investigation beyond current understanding into new ways of connecting experience and knowledge. Papers, panels, and streams are invited to explore all aspects of this theme, including, but not limited to:

  • the limitations of inherited categorization and definition
  • race, gender, class, and dis/ability boundaries and categories
  • encounters across boundaries, through material, cultural, and social exchange
  • the categorization of the human and animal
  • national and religious boundaries and categorization
  • the role of interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary research
  • temporal boundaries and categories, including questions of periodization

Proposals for papers on all aspects of the medieval and early modern are also welcome.

For more information and to submit a proposal, visit the website here: https://anzamemsconference2019.wordpress.com/call-for-papers/

Call for Postgraduate Student & ECR Travel Bursary, Kim Walker Postgraduate Travel Bursary and George Yule Prize Applications

Postgraduate and Early Career Scholars meeting the requirements to apply for bursaries and prizes are encouraged to apply before 30 September 2018.

For more information and to submit an application, visit the website here: https://anzamemsconference2019.wordpress.com/bursaries-prizes/

Call for Applications to Postgraduate Advanced Training Seminars

The PATS will run on 4-5 February 2019, as a two-day training seminar preceding the conference.

Strand 1, Digital Editing and the Medieval & Early Modern Manuscript, will focus on the skills of paleography and codicology as well as digital editing and text encoding as participants collaboratively create an edition of a manuscript.

Strand 2, Doing Digital Humanities: From Project Planning to Digital Delivery, will focus on the skills of digital project management, and aims to assist participants to develop their own digital projects with the support of instructors.

For more information and to submit an application, visit the website here: https://anzamemsconference2019.wordpress.com/pats/

 

 

CFP for panel on Music, Emotions, Medievalism at ANZAMEMS 2019

Proposals for 20-minute papers are invited for a panel on Music, Emotions, Medievalism to be convened at the ANZAMEMS 2019 conference, University of Sydney, 5-8 February 2019.

The panel asks: What is distinctive about musical medievalism? What can the post-medieval reception, invention, representation or ideological employment of medieval music tell us about medievalism’s desires, emotions and enjoyments that differs from, qualifies, or complements what we find in medievalist literature, art, architecture, film or gaming? What emotions come into play when music supplies the medium or the matter of medievalist creation?

For further details and to submit an abstract, please contact andrew.lynch@uwa.edu.au

Parergon: Preview the research in our latest issue

The latest issue of ANZAMEMS’ journal Parergon is now out. This open issue features original research articles ranging across a wide variety of topics, disciplines and time periods, along with a large selection of book reviews. A summary of research articles with abstracts is provided below. Full access is available via Project MUSEAustralian Public Affairs – Full Text, and Humanities Full Text.

Parergon is an international, double-blind peer-reviewed journal that publishes articles and book reviews on all aspects of medieval and early modern literature, history, and culture. We are especially interested in material that crosses traditional disciplinary boundaries and takes new approaches. We welcome submissions from established and early career scholars, and from postgraduate students. For details and submission guidelines, see https://submissions.parergon.org/index.php?journal=parergon&page=index

Content summary: Volume 35, Number 1 (2018)

The Emperor’s New Sanctum: A Folktale in Jordanes’ Gothic History
Nathan J. Ristuccia

Historians debate whether the late antique historian Jordanes employed oral traditions in his history of the Goths: the Getica. Close examination of one narrative in the Getica demonstrates that Jordanes almost certainly knew an aetiological folktale related to the modern fairy tale type ‘The Frog King’ (ATU 440). This folktale, however, was not of Gothic origins: it was a native East Roman legend. In context, this lost folktale was a miracle account, not a fairy tale. Jordanes’ legend shares motifs with other pagan, Jewish, and Christian stories from late antiquity, illustrating the common storytelling culture of the period.

The Imperial Character: Alexius I and Ideal Emperorship in Twelfth–Century Byzantium
Elisabeth Rolston

The reign of Alexius I Comnenus (1081–1118) offers an opportunity to explore the ideology of Byzantine emperorship at a time of administrative reform. Two twelfth-century historians, Anna Comnena and John Zonaras, evaluate Alexius’s suitability to occupy the imperial office differently. Anna Comnena’s Alexiad draws on ancient tradition to establish Alexius as an ideal emperor. John Zonaras’s Epitome Historiarum sets different standards for private men and for emperors, finding that Alexius falls short of the imperial standard. Although Anna and John describe Alexius’s character similarly, their disagreement regarding his ability to rule reflects a fundamental difference in their understanding of emperorship.

Frederick II of Hohenstaufen’s Australasian Cockatoo:Symbol of Detente between East and West and Evidence of the Ayyubids’ Global Reach
Heather Dalton, Jukka Salo, Pekka Niemelä and Simo Ör

Frederick II of Sicily made contact with the Kurdish al-Malik Muhammad al-Kamil in 1217—a year before al-Malik became sultan of Egypt. The two rulers communicated regularly over the following twenty years, exchanging letters, books and rare and exotic animals. The focus of this article is the Sulphur-crested or Yellow-crested Cockatoo the sultan sent Frederick. A written description and four sketches of this parrot survive in a mid thirteenth-century manuscript in the Vatican Library. This article reviews these images, revealing that Australasian cockatoos were present in the Middle East in the medieval period and exploring how and why one reached Europe in the mid thirteenth century.

See also the media coverage of this article at The Guardian and BBC.

Simul iustus et peccator: The Theological Significance of Shifts of Perspective in the Middle English Cleanness and Patience
Piotr Spyra

Cleanness and Patience, two biblical paraphrases found in MS Cotton Nero A.x, present a strikingly different image of God, the former revolving around acts of destruction that spring from the deity’s uncontrollable wrath and the latter subverting this by focusing on divine mercy. The juxtaposition of the two poems in the manuscript is here read with the structure of a diptych in mind, which makes it possible to trace the influence of Augustinian thought on the poet. The interplay of Cleanness and Patience is shown to produce a powerful theological statement about man’s relationship with God that brings the poet surprisingly close to a position adopted about a century and a half later by Martin Luther.

Animals as Criminals:Towards a Foucauldian Analysis of Animal Trials
Emre Koyuncu

Scholarship on the early modern practice of animal trials in Europe has grown substantially in the last few decades. After a critical literature review pointing at the shortcomings of positivist approaches and of the interpretation of the phenomenon as a purely religious practice, I present Foucauldian genealogy as a more rigorous framework for understanding the purpose this peculiar practice may have served. The benefits of adopting a Foucauldian perspective are twofold. First, it allows for a subtle functionalism that does not treat this tradition as a homogeneous block. Second, it gives an opportunity to introduce the animal body into Foucault’s genealogy of power, which rather focuses on the human body and interhuman relationships.

Anne of the Wicked Ways: Perceptions of Anne Boleyn as a Witch in History and in Popular Culture
Roland Hui

In life and in death, Anne Boleyn has always invited controversy. On the one hand, she was that ‘godly lady and queen’ under whom ‘the religion of Christ most happily flourished’. But to her detractors, Anne was the very ‘scandal of Christendom’. A prevailing view that commonly appears in both scholarly and popular texts is that Anne was either perceived in her time as a witch or was indeed a witch. However, this essay argues that such a perception is relatively recent – one created in the earlier part of the twentieth century, sustained by modern writers and historians, and in popular culture. It demonstrates that Anne was never regarded as such by her contemporaries or by those who were critical of her.

Cosmopolitanism and ‘Strange Flesh’ in Antony and Cleopatra
Pompa Banerjee

Two distinct cosmopolitanisms emerge from Antony and Caesar’s consumption of ‘strange flesh’ in Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra. Antony’s cosmopolitanism exposes him to the hospitality and appetite of a voracious stranger who unmoors him from Rome. Estranged from his Roman ‘brother’ Caesar, Antony is linked through the metaphor of strange flesh to Rome’s enemy, Hannibal, who crossed the Alps into Italy. Through Hannibal, Antony unsettles Rome’s ideological certainty but loses his home. In contrast, Caesar substitutes Rome for the world through imperial metonymy. He swallows the world’s ‘strange flesh’. Turning from guest to host, he incorporates the other into the body of Rome.

ANZAMEMS 2019: Session CFPs

A reminder that calls for papers are open for the following sessions and panels at the ANZAMEMS 2019 conference, to be held at the University of Sydney, 5-8 February 2019. Follow the links for further details of content, organisers and deadlines.

Cultural Identity in the Early Medieval Celtic World

Cultural Identity in the Anglo-Scandinavian World

Boundaries of the Law

Rereading the Medieval and Early Modern

Language And Agency From Medieval To Early Modern

Crusades: Categories, Boundaries and Horizons

Scholarly Editing

The Horizons of Queenship: Redefining the Power of Queens 

Beyond the Horizon: The Afterlife of Monarchs