Category Archives: ANZAMEMS

ANZAMEMS 2019: CFP deadline extended to 15 September

The deadline to submit paper abstracts and panel/roundtable proposals for the ANZAMEMS 2019 Conference (5-8 February 2019 in Sydney, Australia) has been extended until Friday, 15 September.

The theme for ANZAMEMS 2019 is Categories, Boundaries, Horizons. Categories and boundaries help us to define our fields of knowledge and subjects of inquiry, but can also contain and limit our perspectives. The concept of category emerges etymologically from the experience of speaking in an assembly, a dialogic forum in which new ways of explaining can emerge. Boundaries and horizons are intertwined in their meanings, pointing to the limits of subjectivity, and inviting investigation beyond current understanding into new ways of connecting experience and knowledge.

Papers, panels, and streams are invited to explore all aspects of this theme, including, but not limited to:

  • the limitations of inherited categorization and definition
  • race, gender, class, and dis/ability boundaries and categories
  • encounters across boundaries, through material, cultural, and social exchange
  • the categorization of the human and animal
  • national and religious boundaries and categorization
  • the role of interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary research
  • temporal boundaries and categories, including questions of periodization

Proposals for papers on all aspects of the medieval and early modern are also welcome.

For more information and to submit a proposal, visit the website here:
https://anzamemsconference2019.wordpress.com/call-for-papers/

Applicants for Travel Bursaries and the George Yule Prize should apply by 30 September 2018. for more information, see https://anzamemsconference2019.wordpress.com/bursaries-prizes/

ANZAMEMS publication prizes and conference travel bursaries close soon

A reminder to all ANZAMEMS members that 30 September is the closing deadline for applications for the ANZAMEMS publication prizes and for postgraduate/ECR travel bursaries to attend the ANZAMEMS 2019 conference (Sydney, Australia 5-8 February 2019).

Postgraduate Student & ECR Travel Bursary, Kim Walker Postgraduate Travel Bursary and George Yule Prize Applications

Travel bursaries and prizes enable current or recent postgraduates who are currently unwaged to attend the ANZAMEMS Biennial Conference and deliver a paper at a session. Postgraduate and Early Career Scholars wishing to apply should see the eligibility requirements and apply at: https://anzamemsconference2019.wordpress.com/bursaries-prizes/

Patricia Crawford Postgraduate Publication Prize

The Patricia Crawford Postgraduate Publication Prize is awarded to a postgraduate student for the best article-length scholarly work in any discipline/topic falling within the scope of medieval and early modern studies, published within the previous two years. The winner will be announced at the ANZAMEMS 2019 conference.

For more information and to submit an application see: https://anzamems.org/?page_id=8#PC

Philippa Maddern ECR Publication Prize

The Philippa Maddern ECR Publication Prize is awarded to an Early Career Researcher (ECR) for the best article-length scholarly work in any discipline/topic falling within the scope of medieval and early modern studies, published within the previous two years. The winner will be announced at the ANZAMEMS 2019 conference.

For more information and to submit an application see: https://anzamems.org/?page_id=8#PM

ANZAMEMS 2019: Closing dates approaching for CFP, bursaries and prizes, PATS

The Committee of the ANZAMEMS 2019 Conference (5-8 February 2019 in Sydney, Australia) invites paper and panel proposals, PATS expressions of interest, and bursary and prize applications to be made by the following dates:

Call for Papers Deadline: 31 August 2018

Travel Bursary and George Yule Prize Application Deadline: 30 September 2018

Postgraduate Advanced Training Seminars Application Deadline: 31 August 2018

Call for Papers and Panels

The theme for ANZAMEMS 2019 is Categories, Boundaries, Horizons. Categories and boundaries help us to define our fields of knowledge and subjects of inquiry, but can also contain and limit our perspectives. The concept of category emerges etymologically from the experience of speaking in an assembly, a dialogic forum in which new ways of explaining can emerge. Boundaries and horizons are intertwined in their meanings, pointing to the limits of subjectivity, and inviting investigation beyond current understanding into new ways of connecting experience and knowledge. Papers, panels, and streams are invited to explore all aspects of this theme, including, but not limited to:

  • the limitations of inherited categorization and definition
  • race, gender, class, and dis/ability boundaries and categories
  • encounters across boundaries, through material, cultural, and social exchange
  • the categorization of the human and animal
  • national and religious boundaries and categorization
  • the role of interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary research
  • temporal boundaries and categories, including questions of periodization

Proposals for papers on all aspects of the medieval and early modern are also welcome.

For more information and to submit a proposal, visit the website here: https://anzamemsconference2019.wordpress.com/call-for-papers/

Call for Postgraduate Student & ECR Travel Bursary, Kim Walker Postgraduate Travel Bursary and George Yule Prize Applications

Postgraduate and Early Career Scholars meeting the requirements to apply for bursaries and prizes are encouraged to apply before 30 September 2018.

For more information and to submit an application, visit the website here: https://anzamemsconference2019.wordpress.com/bursaries-prizes/

Call for Applications to Postgraduate Advanced Training Seminars

The PATS will run on 4-5 February 2019, as a two-day training seminar preceding the conference.

Strand 1, Digital Editing and the Medieval & Early Modern Manuscript, will focus on the skills of paleography and codicology as well as digital editing and text encoding as participants collaboratively create an edition of a manuscript.

Strand 2, Doing Digital Humanities: From Project Planning to Digital Delivery, will focus on the skills of digital project management, and aims to assist participants to develop their own digital projects with the support of instructors.

For more information and to submit an application, visit the website here: https://anzamemsconference2019.wordpress.com/pats/

 

 

CFP for panel on Music, Emotions, Medievalism at ANZAMEMS 2019

Proposals for 20-minute papers are invited for a panel on Music, Emotions, Medievalism to be convened at the ANZAMEMS 2019 conference, University of Sydney, 5-8 February 2019.

The panel asks: What is distinctive about musical medievalism? What can the post-medieval reception, invention, representation or ideological employment of medieval music tell us about medievalism’s desires, emotions and enjoyments that differs from, qualifies, or complements what we find in medievalist literature, art, architecture, film or gaming? What emotions come into play when music supplies the medium or the matter of medievalist creation?

For further details and to submit an abstract, please contact andrew.lynch@uwa.edu.au

Parergon: Preview the research in our latest issue

The latest issue of ANZAMEMS’ journal Parergon is now out. This open issue features original research articles ranging across a wide variety of topics, disciplines and time periods, along with a large selection of book reviews. A summary of research articles with abstracts is provided below. Full access is available via Project MUSEAustralian Public Affairs – Full Text, and Humanities Full Text.

Parergon is an international, double-blind peer-reviewed journal that publishes articles and book reviews on all aspects of medieval and early modern literature, history, and culture. We are especially interested in material that crosses traditional disciplinary boundaries and takes new approaches. We welcome submissions from established and early career scholars, and from postgraduate students. For details and submission guidelines, see https://submissions.parergon.org/index.php?journal=parergon&page=index

Content summary: Volume 35, Number 1 (2018)

The Emperor’s New Sanctum: A Folktale in Jordanes’ Gothic History
Nathan J. Ristuccia

Historians debate whether the late antique historian Jordanes employed oral traditions in his history of the Goths: the Getica. Close examination of one narrative in the Getica demonstrates that Jordanes almost certainly knew an aetiological folktale related to the modern fairy tale type ‘The Frog King’ (ATU 440). This folktale, however, was not of Gothic origins: it was a native East Roman legend. In context, this lost folktale was a miracle account, not a fairy tale. Jordanes’ legend shares motifs with other pagan, Jewish, and Christian stories from late antiquity, illustrating the common storytelling culture of the period.

The Imperial Character: Alexius I and Ideal Emperorship in Twelfth–Century Byzantium
Elisabeth Rolston

The reign of Alexius I Comnenus (1081–1118) offers an opportunity to explore the ideology of Byzantine emperorship at a time of administrative reform. Two twelfth-century historians, Anna Comnena and John Zonaras, evaluate Alexius’s suitability to occupy the imperial office differently. Anna Comnena’s Alexiad draws on ancient tradition to establish Alexius as an ideal emperor. John Zonaras’s Epitome Historiarum sets different standards for private men and for emperors, finding that Alexius falls short of the imperial standard. Although Anna and John describe Alexius’s character similarly, their disagreement regarding his ability to rule reflects a fundamental difference in their understanding of emperorship.

Frederick II of Hohenstaufen’s Australasian Cockatoo:Symbol of Detente between East and West and Evidence of the Ayyubids’ Global Reach
Heather Dalton, Jukka Salo, Pekka Niemelä and Simo Ör

Frederick II of Sicily made contact with the Kurdish al-Malik Muhammad al-Kamil in 1217—a year before al-Malik became sultan of Egypt. The two rulers communicated regularly over the following twenty years, exchanging letters, books and rare and exotic animals. The focus of this article is the Sulphur-crested or Yellow-crested Cockatoo the sultan sent Frederick. A written description and four sketches of this parrot survive in a mid thirteenth-century manuscript in the Vatican Library. This article reviews these images, revealing that Australasian cockatoos were present in the Middle East in the medieval period and exploring how and why one reached Europe in the mid thirteenth century.

See also the media coverage of this article at The Guardian and BBC.

Simul iustus et peccator: The Theological Significance of Shifts of Perspective in the Middle English Cleanness and Patience
Piotr Spyra

Cleanness and Patience, two biblical paraphrases found in MS Cotton Nero A.x, present a strikingly different image of God, the former revolving around acts of destruction that spring from the deity’s uncontrollable wrath and the latter subverting this by focusing on divine mercy. The juxtaposition of the two poems in the manuscript is here read with the structure of a diptych in mind, which makes it possible to trace the influence of Augustinian thought on the poet. The interplay of Cleanness and Patience is shown to produce a powerful theological statement about man’s relationship with God that brings the poet surprisingly close to a position adopted about a century and a half later by Martin Luther.

Animals as Criminals:Towards a Foucauldian Analysis of Animal Trials
Emre Koyuncu

Scholarship on the early modern practice of animal trials in Europe has grown substantially in the last few decades. After a critical literature review pointing at the shortcomings of positivist approaches and of the interpretation of the phenomenon as a purely religious practice, I present Foucauldian genealogy as a more rigorous framework for understanding the purpose this peculiar practice may have served. The benefits of adopting a Foucauldian perspective are twofold. First, it allows for a subtle functionalism that does not treat this tradition as a homogeneous block. Second, it gives an opportunity to introduce the animal body into Foucault’s genealogy of power, which rather focuses on the human body and interhuman relationships.

Anne of the Wicked Ways: Perceptions of Anne Boleyn as a Witch in History and in Popular Culture
Roland Hui

In life and in death, Anne Boleyn has always invited controversy. On the one hand, she was that ‘godly lady and queen’ under whom ‘the religion of Christ most happily flourished’. But to her detractors, Anne was the very ‘scandal of Christendom’. A prevailing view that commonly appears in both scholarly and popular texts is that Anne was either perceived in her time as a witch or was indeed a witch. However, this essay argues that such a perception is relatively recent – one created in the earlier part of the twentieth century, sustained by modern writers and historians, and in popular culture. It demonstrates that Anne was never regarded as such by her contemporaries or by those who were critical of her.

Cosmopolitanism and ‘Strange Flesh’ in Antony and Cleopatra
Pompa Banerjee

Two distinct cosmopolitanisms emerge from Antony and Caesar’s consumption of ‘strange flesh’ in Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra. Antony’s cosmopolitanism exposes him to the hospitality and appetite of a voracious stranger who unmoors him from Rome. Estranged from his Roman ‘brother’ Caesar, Antony is linked through the metaphor of strange flesh to Rome’s enemy, Hannibal, who crossed the Alps into Italy. Through Hannibal, Antony unsettles Rome’s ideological certainty but loses his home. In contrast, Caesar substitutes Rome for the world through imperial metonymy. He swallows the world’s ‘strange flesh’. Turning from guest to host, he incorporates the other into the body of Rome.

ANZAMEMS 2019: Session CFPs

A reminder that calls for papers are open for the following sessions and panels at the ANZAMEMS 2019 conference, to be held at the University of Sydney, 5-8 February 2019. Follow the links for further details of content, organisers and deadlines.

Cultural Identity in the Early Medieval Celtic World

Cultural Identity in the Anglo-Scandinavian World

Boundaries of the Law

Rereading the Medieval and Early Modern

Language And Agency From Medieval To Early Modern

Crusades: Categories, Boundaries and Horizons

Scholarly Editing

The Horizons of Queenship: Redefining the Power of Queens 

Beyond the Horizon: The Afterlife of Monarchs

 

ANZAMEMS 2019: Entries open for bursaries and prizes (postgrad/ECR)

The organising committee of the ANZAMEMS 2019 Conference is pleased to announce that we are now accepting applications for postgraduate/ECR bursaries to support conference attendance, and entries for the George Yule Essay Prize.

Entry requirements and details on how to apply can be found here: https://anzamemsconference2019.wordpress.com/bursaries-prizes/

George Yule Essay Prize

The George Yule Prize is awarded to the best essay written by a postgraduate. It is awarded biennially, at each ANZAMEMS Conference. The winner will receive a travel bursary for assistance in attending the conference, $AUD 500 in prize money, and a year’s free subscription to Parergon.

The closing date for George Yule Essay Prize submissions is 30 September 2018.

Postgraduate/Recent Graduate Conference Bursaries

To enable current or recent postgraduates who are currently unwaged to attend the ANZAMEMS Biennial Conference and deliver a paper at a session, travel bursaries will be offered. The amount of funding available and hence the number of bursaries funded, will be determined by the Conference Committee after they have considered the applications.

  • Current postgraduates should be enrolled in higher degree research programs (MA by research or PhD) at the time of their application.
  • Unwaged early career scholars should have graduated from a higher degree research program (MA by research or PhD) within the last two years, and should be in less than 0.5% of full-time employment.

The closing date for travel bursary applications is 30 September 2018.

Kim Walker Postgraduate Travel Bursary

One of the conference bursary applicants will be selected for the Kim Walker Travel Bursary, which is awarded in honour of Kim Walker, who taught in the English program at Victoria University of Wellington. The prize is currently set at $AUD 500.

Postgraduate students who have applied for a Postgraduate Travel Bursary (above) before the relevant deadline will automatically be considered for the Kim Walker Postgraduate Travel Bursary. A separate application is not necessary. Note that you do not have to be a member of ANZAMEMS to apply for the Kim Walker Postgraduate Travel Bursary.

 

CFP: AEMA Panels at ANZAMEMS 2019

Proposals are invited for two panels being organised by the Australian Early Medieval Association for the ANZAMEMS 2019 conference, 5 – 8 February 2019, University of Sydney. A summary of each panel follows. See the attached PDFs for full proposal requirements and contact details. Call for proposals closes 3 August 2018 (extended to 17 August for Panel 2).

Panel 1: Cultural Identity in the Early Medieval Celtic World

Identity is a cultural marker that is almost ephemeral, so hard is it to pin down in the sources. It is a quality which varies over time, has different meanings depending on the intended audience, and an individual can hold multiple identities. Yet in the early medieval world, a person’s identity could be readily discerned from various visual and aural markers. This session will seek to uncover how identity was understood among early medieval communities, tribes, and kingdoms within the Celtic-speaking lands of Europe.

Proposals are invited for 20 minute papers on any aspect of Celtic cultural identity including, but not limited to:

  • Etymology, Categorisation, and the description of identity in the early medieval period
  • The changing nature of cultural boundaries and horizons over time
  • Modes of change for cultural and/or personal identity across time and space
  • The individual within society: definitions of self
  • How did individuals change their identity: war, migration, conversion, marriage and death
  • How were strangers identified in the context of pilgrimage, mercantile travel, or war
  • The limitations of modern categories of cultural identification
  • The role of interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary research

Panel 2: Cultural Identity in the Anglo-Scandinavian World

Scandinavian migration and settlement in the British Isles and Ireland in the early Viking Age effected significant cultural and social change among communities as cultures interacted, assimilated and, at times, rejected one-another. For scholars, categorising the resultant cultural groups has proved contentious, with a proliferation of overlapping terms such as ‘Anglo-Dane,’ ‘Anglo-Scandinavian,’ ‘Hiberno-Norse,’ ‘viking,’ ‘Norse,’ and ‘Dane,’ used interchangeably as ethnic identifiers. Contemporary sources, in contrast, do not clearly ascribe identity to ethnicity, but rather by cultural origin or religion. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, for example, primarily refers to those of a Scandinavian cultural identity simply as Dene [Dane] or, at times when interactions were hostile, as hæðene [heathen]. Which gives rise to the question: how was cultural identity perceived in the Early Medieval Anglo-Scandinavian world and to what degree was self-identity associated with ethnicity, religion, or language?

Proposals are invited for 20 minute papers on any aspect of Anglo-Scandinavian cultural identity including, but not limited to:

  • Migration and the inter-cultural exchange of ideas
  • Religious identity and Christianisation
  • Linguistic identity and cross-cultural communication
  • Characterisations of the foreign in saga literature
  • The utility of modern categories of cultural identification

Download (PDF, 543KB)

Download (PDF, 77KB)

 

CFP: Crusades: Categories, Boundaries and Horizons panel at ANZAMEMS 2019

The theme for the 2019 Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies (ANZAMEMS) conference is Categories, Boundaries, Horizons. This offers an excellent opportunity to explore medieval and modern perceptions of the crusades and crusading, examine the implications of categories and boundaries in our field, and discuss the future horizons of the field in a series of linked panels.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Boundaries and the liminal in crusade sources
  • Categories and boundaries in scholarship (e.g. restriction, anachronism)
  • Future horizons of crusades scholarship

These sessions are organised by Megan Cassidy-Welch (University of Queensland) and Beth Spacey (University of Queensland). If you would be interested in applying to give a 20-minute paper as part of these sessions, please send a paper title and a 200-word abstract to Beth Spacey (beth.spacey@gmail.com) by 31 July 2018.

THE CONFERENCE

The twelfth biennial ANZAMEMS Conference will be held in Sydney, Australia, 5-8 February 2019 at the Camperdown Campus of the University of Sydney. More information is available here: https://anzamemsconference2019.wordpress.com/.

Download (PDF, 77KB)

CFP: Boundaries of the Law panel at ANZAMEMS 2019

Proposals for 20-minute papers are invited for an interdisciplinary panel on boundaries of the law in medieval and early modern societies, to be convened at the ANZAMEMS 2019 conference, 5-8 February 2019, University of Sydney. The conference theme is Boundaries, Categories, Horizons.

Conventional approaches to legal history often aim to fix the parameters of any given legal system, and to clearly demarcate ‘law’ from ‘non-law’. Such approaches can be confounded by the realities of medieval and early modern societies, which were characterized by legal ambiguities, blurred boundaries, conflicting jurisdictions and contested authorities. This panel seeks to use interdisciplinary approaches, to ask new questions of familiar sources, and to use new sources and methods to productively explore tensions, complexities and conflict in the ways law was defined, enforced, experienced and resisted in medieval and early modern societies.

Topics and themes could include (but are not limited to):

  • Breaking the boundaries of conventional legal history – new sources and methodologies for studying law, legal cultures and society
  • Liminal spaces and overlapping jurisdictions
  • Textual and oral/aural authorities and knowledges
  • Gendered experiences of the law
  • Multilingualism and languages of the law
  • Blurred boundaries between law and custom
  • Literary representations of law and legal culture
  • Conflicting or inter-penetrating codes and legal cultures, including customary, civil and common law, and Christian, Jewish and Islamic traditions
  • The legal, the extra-legal and the illicit
  • Advocacy and legal practice by lay people, semi-professionals and professionals

This session is organized by Amanda McVitty (Massey University). Please send proposals for 20-minute papers to e.a.mcvitty@massey.ac.nz by 16 August 2018.

Proposals should include:

  • Presenter name
  • Affiliation (if relevant)
  • Paper title and a 200-word abstract
  • Any day of the conference on which you CANNOT present
  • AV requirements other than standard PowerPoint + projector

The twelfth biennial ANZAMEMS Conference will be held in Sydney, Australia, 5-8 February 2019 at the Camperdown Campus of the University of Sydney. For more information see https://anzamemsconference2019.wordpress.com/

This panel is organized in accordance with the ANZAMEMS Equity & Diversity guidelines: https://anzamemsconference2019.wordpress.com/equity-diversity/