Category Archives: ANZAMEMS

ANZAMEMS membership fees now due for 2019

Current and prospective members of ANZAMEMS are reminded that membership fees for 2019 are now due. New and renewing members are advised that you must be a financial member by 31 March 2019 in order to receive the upcoming issue of the Association’s journal Parergon (Issue 36.1) or vote in the elections to be held at the forthcoming AGM on 1 April. Those unable to attend the AGM need to return their proxy voting forms to the ANZAMEMS Secretary by 25 March.

Membership fees start at AUD$33 for concessional (student/unwaged/retired) and AUD$66 for full individual membership. Institutional subscriptions are also available. To join, please visit the ANZAMEMS website.

The benefits of membership include:

  • Subscription to Parergon — the latest research in medieval and early modern studies and reviews of recent books, published twice yearly (please note you will receive one hard copy of the journal only).
  • Opportunity to apply for a range of travel bursaries and publication prizes award by ANZAMEMS
  • Opportunity to review the latest academic titles for Parergon.
  • Inclusion on the ANZAMEMS mail-list — receive notifications of upcoming events and opportunities, be informed of the books available for review in Parergon.
  • Inclusion on the ANZAMEMS postgraduate and early career research social group on the social media platform Facebook.
  • Access to a dynamic and supportive international research network.

Notice of ANZAMEMS AGM

The Annual General Meeting of ANZAMEMS Inc. will be held on Monday 1 April 2019 at 10:00am-12:00pm (WST).

The meeting is hosted by The University of Western Australia and will be held via the video conferencing software Zoom. 

Local times (for your convenience):
WA: 10:00am-12:00pm
QLD: 12:00pm-2:00pm
SA: 12:30pm-2:30pm
VIC/NSW/TAS/ACT: 1:00pm-3:00pm
New Zealand: 3:00pm-5:00pm

Current members should have received by email details of matters to be voted on at the upcoming AGM, along with a Proxy Voting Form for those members who are unable to attend the meeting in person, and details for joining the meeting by Zoom video conferencing. If you are a current financial member and have not received this information, please contact the ANZAMEMS Executive Administrator Marina Gerzic.

You must be a financial member of ANZAMEMS for 2019 in order for your vote to be considered valid. To renew your membership for 2019, or to join ANZAMEMS, please visit: https://anzamems.org/?page_id=75

New member publication: Contemporary Chaucer across the Centuries

Contemporary Chaucer across the Centuries cover imageCongratulations to ANZAMEMS members Helen Hickey, Anne McKendry and Melissa Raine on the publication of their co-edited collection Contemporary Chaucer across the Centuries (Manchester University Press, 2018). It is doubly pleasing that the book is a festschrift for long-time ANZAMEMS member and past president Stephanie Trigg, who has contributed so much to the Association and to the wider field of medieval and early modern studies. Below, the editors reflect on what inspired their book and the diverse approaches contributors take to its unifying themes.

“We were delighted to take up the opportunity to celebrate Stephanie Trigg’s academic achievements as well as her tireless fostering of scholarly communities throughout her career. Our intention was to create a vibrant collection that attests to her achievements and her generosity as a researcher. We felt that within Stephanie’s wide-ranging interests, Geoffrey Chaucer was central to the progression of her own ideas and her sphere of influence. For over 700 years, many readers have claimed powerful personal connections not only with Chaucer’s writing, but with the author himself. Stephanie’s Congenial Souls (2001) delved deeply into the desires that Chaucer’s literary output has both created and fed throughout those seven centuries. This mode of inquiry, which she describes as a symptomatic long history, makes explicit the stakes and the manoeuvres that give shape to the experience of communing with the Chaucerian text, its author, and the age in which he lived, claims that are at times proprietorial and exclusive, and at others challenging and resistant. Stephanie has since employed this methodology to interrogate hierarchised distinctions between scholarly and creative responses to medieval culture, the latter often known as medievalism. Congenial Souls therefore offers an important contribution to Chaucer scholarship, but further lays down groundwork for researchers of medieval culture to reflect on the broader significance of their own practices.

Two decades after the publication of Congenial Souls, we felt it was timely to review current debates surrounding the traditions, emotions and intellectual underpinnings of Chaucer scholarship, and the implications of this work for researching the Middle Ages more generally. Contemporary Chaucer across the Centuries showcases the contributions of fourteen outstanding thinkers in the field who explore both Chaucer’s writing and the longue durée of its reception. The diversity of topics and approaches evinces the dynamic and innovative research that Chaucer’s writing continues to inspire, as well as the resonance of Stephanie’s insights within contemporary Chaucer research.

Each essay stands alone as a significant contribution to Chaucer scholarship, in some cases drawing attention to features of Chaucer’s poetic techniques and intertextual allusions that have gone unnoticed, despite extensive poring over Chaucer’s oeuvre. Some are inspired by or engage directly with Stephanie’s work on authorship, emotions and medievalism to produce fresh insights into the faces, bodies and environments found within Chaucer’s narratives; others consider emotions and connection with Chaucer himself in critical analyses as well as in creative forms such as cinema and stand-up comedy.

The historical development of Chaucer’s legacy is represented in a variety of contexts, from scribal activity and early print culture through to contests over national identity in the nineteenth century. Several essays address how critical trends and challenges both shape and are impacted by Chaucer’s canonical status, and many individual essays attend to combinations of these themes. Together, they create a dialogue about what the past means in our own present moment, and why Chaucer continues to be such a source of fascination and reward. These essays confirm that we are never truly “done” with the past; we continue to return with new questions to Chaucer’s writing and the astonishing experience of immediacy that it produces in readers even as temporal distance increases. The changing present compels us to reconsider, re-evaluate, and reappraise the connections between literary traditions and contemporary scholarship, and past and present more broadly.

Contemporary Chaucer across the Centuries is also inflected by the diversity of our own research interests. Melissa is currently working on children’s voices in both medieval literature and contemporary Australian culture. In both contexts, she explores how historically specific ideas about childhood, especially the relationships of children with adults, shape the communication of actual and imagined children, including some created by Chaucer. Anne is at the proofing stage of her first monograph, Medieval Crime Fiction: A Critical Overview, which will be published by McFarland in April and offers the first sustained analysis of this neglected but extremely popular example of contemporary medievalism. She is also finalising an article for Exemplaria that considers Chaucer’s Knight’s Tale through Georges Bataille’s theory of an economics of waste. Helen is currently working on feet in medieval and early modern poetics and art, and on ideas of beauty and aesthetics in medieval European poetry. She is completing a chapter on Thomas Hoccleve’s poetics through theories of embodiment.

Helen M. Hickey, Anne McKendry and Melissa Raine are Research Associates at the University of Melbourne’s School of Culture and Communication. A substantial preview of Contemporary Chaucer across the Centuries can be downloaded for free from the publisher’s website: http://www.manchesteruniversitypress.co.uk/9781526129154/

ANZAMEMS members wishing to promote their research through the ANZAMEMS newsletter are invited to email the editor, Amanda McVitty. We particularly welcome approaches from early career scholars.

 

Call for EoI: ANZAMEMS PATS training seminar

ANZAMEMS invites expressions of interest from Association members to host a Postgraduate Advanced Training Seminar (PATS) in Australia or New Zealand in the second half of 2019. The Association makes up to $5,000 available for the PATS. Preference may be given to applications which can provide matching funding.

Expressions of interest should include:

  • Proposed title / skill area to be addressed
  • Name(s) of local presenters
  • Name(s) of international presenters (if applicable)
  • Proposed venue(s)
  • Proposed budget
  • A draft day-by-day plan of the event

A copy of the Association’s Equity and Inclusivity Guidelines for ANZAMEMS Conference and Event Planners can be downloaded at the ANZAMEMS website: https://anzamems.org/?page_id=7

Expressions of interest must be submitted by 31 March 2019 by email to the Executive Administrator, Marina Gerzic at info@anzamems.org.

Expressions of interest will be judged by a three-member panel of the ANZAMEMS Committee (Sue Broomhall, Clare Monagle, Peter Sherlock). The outcome will be announced no later than 14 April 2019.

About PATS

ANZAMEMS is committed to supporting postgraduates and early career scholars by providing funding for specialist, intensive training seminars that can assist in their development as researchers. PATS events also provide attendees with valuable opportunities to network with experts and other postgraduates working in similar fields. Recent PATS include “Digital Editing and the Medieval & Early Modern Manuscript”, “Doing Digital Humanities: From Project Planning to Digital Delivery”, and “Marginalia and Markings: Reading Early Modern and Medieval Readers”. For more information about ANZAMEMS PATS, please see https://anzamems.org/?page_id=10

ANZAMEMS Prize Winners, 2019

Congratulations to all the recipients of ANZAMEMS biennial conference awards and publication prizes, announced last week at the ANZAMEMS 2019 conference.

2018 Philippa Maddern Early Career Researcher Publication Prize
Kirk Essary, for his article “Clear as Mud: Metaphor, Emotion and Meaning in Early Modern England”, English Studies, July 2017.

The Philippa Maddern ECR Publication Prize is awarded to an Early Career Researcher (ECR) for the best article-length scholarly work in any discipline/topic falling within the scope of medieval and early modern studies, published within the previous two years.

2018 Patricia Crawford Postgraduate Publication Prize
Amy Brown, for her article “Female Homosociality and the Marriage Plot: Women and Marriage Negotiation in Cligés and Le Chevalier au Lion“, Parergon, 33.1 (2016).

The Patricia Crawford Postgraduate Publication Prize is awarded to a postgraduate student for the best article-length scholarly work in any discipline/topic falling within the scope of medieval and early modern studies, published within the previous two years.

2019 George Yule Prize
Jennifer E. Nicholson (University of Sydney) “’Pronouncing…some [un]doubtful phrase’: Speech, Agency, and Editing Hamlet via Montaigne’s Essais”

The George Yule Prize is awarded to the best essay written by a postgraduate. It is awarded biennially, at each ANZAMEMS conference.

2019 Kim Walker Postgraduate Travel Bursary
Jane Bitomsky (postgraduate enrolled at University of Queensland and currently based in New Zealand) 

In 2003, ANZAMEMS established a bursary to honour the life and work of Dr Kim Walker, lecturer in English (with specialties in renaissance studies and Shakespeare) at Victoria University of Wellington. The prize winner is selected from among the applicants for conference bursaries.

For further information on ANZAMEMS prizes and awards, please see the Bursaries and Prizes section on the ANZAMEMS website.

Sydney Medieval and Renaissance Group reception and book launch

Attendees at ANZAMEMS 2019 are invited to an end-of-conference reception hosted by the Sydney Medieval and Renaissance Group.

Launch: AEMA member Sharon Davidson launches her book on the history of the Sydney Medieval and Renaissance Group
Host: John Ward

Medieval nibbles, inspired by recipes in Lorna Sass’ cookbook To the King’s Taste, will be served along with a selection of drinks including Hippocras.

Friday 8 February, 6-7pm
MacLaurin Hall, Quadrangle Building
University of Sydney

ANZAMEMS 2019: Register now for special events

If you are joining us for ANZAMEMS 2019 at the University of Sydney next week, please take a few minutes to check the website for a range of special events the conference team has planned. These include:

Manuscript/Early Book Tour of the State Library of New South Wales

Tuesday 5 February, 2:30-4pm 

Join curators from the State Library of New South Wales for a tour of the library, which can trace its history back to 1826. The tour will provide an overview of the different reading rooms in the Library and some of the beautiful spaces and exhibitions in its historic Mitchell Wing. The tour will also include a private viewing of some Renaissance treasures from the Library’s rich and varied collections.

Free, but please register through this EventBrite link

Postgraduate Reception: Let’s Meet and Eat

Thursday 7 February, 6-7pm, Courtyard Restaurant and Bar at the University of Sydney

Per ANZAMEMS conference tradition, the current Postgraduate Representatives to the Executive Committee (Lisa Rolston and Hannah Skipworth) will hold a reception for ANZAMEMS postgraduates. The ambition behind this year’s event is to provide postgraduates with an opportunity to meet their peers from around Australia and New Zealand and establish connections that will carry them into future endeavours. Honours students and ECRs are most welcome to attend.

Free. Please register through this EventBrite link.

Treasures of the Fisher Library

The librarians of the Rare Books and Special Collections in the Fisher Library at the University of Sydney have generously arranged to show some treasures of the library to conference attendees at a number of scheduled times during the conference. The books include manuscripts and early printed books generally related to the conference theme. The numbers in these sessions will be capped so that visitors can examine the books and talk with the librarians about them.

A range of timeslots are available throughout the conference (5-8 February). Please see the ANZAMEMS 2019 conference website to check times and register.

Other special events include a screening of the film The Devil’s Country, a documentary that explores the intersection of the medieval demonic, the colonial experience of the Australian landscape, and the Indigenous experience of invasion and westward expansion through NSW.

There will also be a concert by The Marais Project. This group, founded in 2000 by viola da gambist, Jennifer Eriksson, focuses on the music of the baroque era with a particular emphasis on the works of Marin Marais, a performer and composer at the Court of Louis XIV.

Postgraduate reception at ANZAMEMS 2019

Postgraduates (including Honours students) and ECRs are invited to join ANZAMEMS Postgraduate Representatives Hannah Skipworth and Lisa Rolston for this free and friendly reception at ANZAMEMS 2019.

The ambition behind this year’s event is to provide postgraduates with an opportunity to meet their peers from around Australia and New Zealand and establish connections that will carry them into future endeavours. During this event, we encourage students in the final stages of their dissertations to seek out those who may be new to further research. After all, everyone needs a friendly bit of encouragement (but also some real talk) now and then!

Sharing platters and a modest bar tab will be provided.

This event is free but for catering purposes, please RSVP via our event page: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/postgraduate-reception-lets-meet-and-eat-tickets-54833459353

ANZAMEMS membership fees for 2019 now due

To all ANZAMEMS members: membership fees are now due for 2019. If you have not yet paid your fees, please ensure you do this promptly to ensure continuation of member benefits, including delivery of the journal Parergon.

In order to receive a hard copy of Parergon 36.1 you will need to pay your 2019 membership fees by 31 March 2019. Please also note that you will need to be a financial member to vote at the upcoming AGM in April as well as to nominate for any vacant Committee member roles.

Fees and benefits

Membership of ANZAMEMS is open to anyone with an interest in the fields of medieval and early modern studies. Membership fees start at AUD$33 concessional (student/unwaged/retired) and AUD$60 individual. Members receive the following exclusive benefits:

  • Subscription to Parergon — the latest research in medieval and early modern studies and reviews of recent books, published twice yearly (please note you will receive one hard copy of the journal only)
  • Inclusion on the ANZAMEMS mail-list — receive notifications of upcoming events and opportunities, be informed of the books available for review in Parergon
  • Inclusion on the ANZAMEMS postgraduate and early career research social group on the social media platform Facebook
  • Regular newsletter outlining the Association’s activities
  • Access to a dynamic and supportive international research network
  • Opportunity to review the latest academic titles for Parergon
  • Opportunity to apply for travel bursaries and prizes award by ANZAMEMS

Payments

Payment should be made via the ANZAMEMS website. Receipts will be posted with the next convenient issue of Parergon.

Some members may experience an issue with the University of Western Australia (UWA) cart system that ANZAMEMS uses to process membership payments if you choose to pay online. If you have attempted to pay you membership fees online and have been having trouble with the ‘Captcha’ system on the shopping cart please try using another internet browser and see if that fixes the problem. UWA is currently looking into this issue.

As an alternative, a hard copy membership renewal form can be downloaded from the website (https://anzamems.org/?page_id=75/) and posted to the following address:

ANZAMEMS (M204)
The University of Western Australia
35 Stirling Hwy
Crawley WA 6009
Australia

Cheques or money orders must be made out to “The University of Western Australia – ANZAMEMS”.

New member publication: Women and Power at the French Court, 1483-1563

Congratulations to ANZAMEMS’ member and Parergon journal editor Professor Susan Broomhall on the publication of a new edited collection, Women and Power at the French Court, 1483-1563 (Amsterdam University Press, 2018).

Cover image Women and Power bookWomen and Power at the French Court, 1483—1563 explores the ways in which a range of women “ as consorts, regents, mistresses, factional power players, attendants at court, or as objects of courtly patronage “ wielded power in order to advance individual, familial, and factional agendas at the early sixteenth-century French court. Spring-boarding from the burgeoning scholarship of gender, the political, and power in early modern Europe, the collection provides a perspective from the French court, from the reigns of Charles VIII to Henri II, a time when the French court was a renowned center of culture and at which women played important roles. Crossdisciplinary in its perspectives, these essays by historians, art and literary scholars investigate the dynamic operations of gendered power in political acts, recognized status as queens and regents, ritualized behaviors such as gift-giving, educational coteries, and through social networking, literary and artistic patronage, female authorship, and epistolary strategies.

For more information, along with a downloadable Introduction and Table of Contents, please visit the AUP website https://www.aup.nl/en/book/9789462983427/women-and-power-at-the-french-court-1483-1563