Category Archives: cfp

CFP Limina conference, UWA July 2019

The call for papers is now open for the 14th annual Limina conference, which will be held at the University of Western Australia on 18-19 July 2019. The theme of this interdisciplinary conference is ‘HUMANIFESTO: Dissecting the Human Experience’. We invite submissions for 20 minute presentations for any topic relating to the intersection of the physical body and the expression of humanity. 

Topics may include (but are not limited to):

– performing bodies / body as spectacle / body art

– social / cultural / political expectations

– identity: race, religion, gender, age, sexuality

– augmented reality / artificial intelligence / genetic manipulation

– rights and rituals / funerary practices

– dysmorphia / alienation

– unembodiment / ghosts / haunting / manifestations

– dehumanisation / othering / objectification

– medicine / public health

– sport / human achievement

Please send submissions with the subject line ‘Humanifesto 2019’ to liminajournal@gmail.com, including a title, abstract (200 words), and short biography (50 words) in a single document.

Deadline for submission is 31 March, 2019.

CFP AEMA 14 – Legitimacy and Illegitimacy

This conference of the Australian Early Medieval Association invites papers on the broad theme of legitimacy. In a modern world dominated by deeply polemical counter narratives not afraid to adjust facts to claim dominance and, thereby, legitimacy, we look at the ways in which modern forms of the pursuit of legitimacy evolved in the early Middle Ages. Legitimacy can have several meanings, covering aspects of authenticity, legality, validity, and conformity. While it literally refers to something that meets the requirements of the law, this legal aspect is not inherent: something can be legitimate without being legal, or be legal without being legitimate.

In the context of the early medieval period, who legitimated? What was their reasons for doing so? Conversely, what was set aside in the process of illegitimisation? And what do these dominant and counter narratives mean for the presentation of history? 

Legitimacy implies dominant views on authority, cultural legitimacy, status, and control of the means to ensure dominance, such as publication. It can create hidden communities and counter-narratives. Even though the early medieval period continues to exist in the popular imagination as backward and insular, in many ways it is a period marked by innovations in both the practice and pursuit of legitimacy, innovations which still resonate to this day. This conference aims to challenge the perception that the modern world is particularly modern in the way it contests legitimacy. 

We invite submissions on the following topics: 

·        Politics and Culture

·        Individuals and Institutions

·        Law and Justice 

·        Status and Inheritance

·        Authenticity and Fraud

·        Orthodoxy and Heresy

·        Truth and Propaganda 

·        Dominant and Counter Narratives

·        Objects and Spaces

·        Modern (re)interpretations of the Early Medieval 

AEMA also welcomes papers concerned with all aspects of the Early Medieval period (c. 400–1150) in all cultural, geographic, religious and linguistic settings, even if they do not strictly adhere to the theme. We especially encourage submissions from graduate students and early career researchers.

Abstracts of 250-300 words for 20-minute papers should be submitted via email to conference@aema.net.au by 5 April 2019.

Limited financial assistance is available to AEMA members on acceptance – please direct all enquiries the conference committee.

CFP for Cerae Volume 6 on ‘Landscapes’

Ceræ: An Australasian Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies is calling for submissions for Volume Six on the theme of ‘Landscapes’. ‘Landscapes’ are composed of complementary and contradictory aspects that interact with, influence and impact upon one another: the natural environment – encompassing plants, animals, and underlying earth itself in all parts of the world – and the imprint of human society on the environment in both physical and intellectual capacities. We can refer to a defined geographic area that is associated with a specific historic event, person, or culture, as well as to the ways in which people interact with their environment throughout time and space. How individuals and societies have interacted with their natural environment, have been limited by it, have tried to shape it, control it, and ultimately have changed it over many centuries of interaction.

Topics may include but are not limited to:

  • investigations on urban and/or rural landscapes
  • relationships with the natural world
  • visual, textual and material representations of landscapes
  • non-visual sensory perceptions of the natural world
  • land-forming, land reclamation, and land loss
  • landscape as metaphor
  • landscape aesthetics
  • ecocriticism
  • cultural landscapes
  • linguistic landscapes
  • mythic landscapes
  • spiritual landscapes
  • the landscapes of conversion, faith and holiness
  • the impact of climate change on medieval and early modern landscapes
  • archaeological landscapes of the past within the present
  • industrial vs agricultural cultural landscapes

Cerae invites submissions encompassing all aspects of the late classical, medieval and early modern world. There are no geographical restrictions. As an interdisciplinary journal, Ceræ encourages submissions across the fields of archaeology, art history, historical ecology, literature, intellectual history, musicology, politics, social studies and beyond.

Articles should be approximately 5000-7000 words. Ceræ particularly encourages submissions from postgraduates and early career researchers. Further details regarding submission and author guidelines including the journal style sheet can be found online at: http://openjournals.arts.uwa.edu.au/index.php/cerae/about/submissions. Non-themed submissions are welcome at any point throughout the year.
The deadline for themed submissions will be 28 February 2019.

Essay Prizes

Ceræ is pleased to offer a prize of $200 (AUD), which will be awarded to the best article in volume 6 on the theme of ‘Landscapes’ by a post-graduate student or early-career researcher.

All further enquiries are most welcome and can be directed to the editor at editorcerae@gmail.com.

CFP Scientiae 2019 deadline extended

In response to inquiries, the organisers are pleased to announce an extended deadline for proposals to the 2019 Scientiae conference (June 12-15th, Queen’s University, Belfast). Proposals will now be accepted until 25 January, 2019.

Scientiae is the interdisciplinary conference on intellectual culture, 1400-1800. It is centred on, but not limited to, developments in the early-modern natural sciences. Philosophers, historians, literary scholars and others are invited to share their perspectives on this vital period. Belfast 2019 will be our 8th annual meeting.

Our plenary speakers at Belfast will be Ingrid Rowland (Notre Dame/Rome) and Rob Iliffe (Oxford).

Scientiae 2019 will also feature two plenary panel sessions: One presented by Subha Mukherji (Cambridge) on “Forms of Knowing,” with Torrance Kirby (McGill), Sorana Corneanu (Bucharest) and Anupam Basu (Washington); and the other co-presented by Marco Sgarbi, Pietro Daniel Omodeo, and Craig Martin (all from Ca’ Foscari, Venice) on “Early-modern Aristotelianisms.”

Other confirmed speakers for Scientiae 2019 include: Raz Chen-Morris, Antonio Clericuzio, Alix Cooper, Peter Hess, Kevin Killeen, W.R. Laird, Nancy McLoughlin, Robert Morrison, Cesare Pastorino, and Vladimir Urbanek.

Proposals are invited for:

  • Individual (20-minute) papers: Please submit a descriptive title, 250-word abstract, and one-page CV.
  • Complete panels: Same as above for each paper, plus 150-word rationale for the panel. Maximum four panellists, plus chair (and/or respondent).
  • Workshops: One-page CV for each workshop leader, plus 250-word plan for the session: topic, techniques, hands-on resources, etc.
  • Seminars: One-page CV for each seminar leader, plus 250-word rationale for the session: its topic, and its suitability for treatment in seminar format.

For more information, and the conference poster, see http://scientiae.co.uk.

All proposals should be sent to pertransibunt@gmail.com.

Call for contributions: Robin Hood Studies

The Bulletin of the International Association for Robin Hood Studies (https://bulletin.iarhs.org) is seeking submissions for future volumes. The Bulletin is the official journal of the International Association for Robin Hood Studies. It is a fully digital, open access, and double-blind peer reviewed journal and is actively indexed in the MLA International Bibliography. In keeping with the Robin Hood tradition, authors retain their rights to their own materials.

Articles are generally 4,000-8,000 words long. Please see the journal’s website for additional submission guidelines.

We invite scholars to submit articles or essays detailing original research on any aspect of the Robin Hood tradition. Submission is via the web, and preliminary inquiries or questions may be directed to Valerie Johnson vjohnso6@montevallo.edu (University of Montevallo) and Alexander Kaufman alkaufman@bsu.edu (Ball State University).

CFP Britain’s Early Philosophers workshop, Durham

The Durham Centre for Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (http://dcamp.uk) is hosting a two-day workshop on Britain’s Early Philosophers on 1-2 April, 2019. The organisers are seeking abstracts for contributed talks on any aspect of philosophy and philosophers born in or living in Britain before 1000.

Who were Britain’s earliest philosophers? What were Alcuin of York’s contributions to philosophy? To what extent can we consider thinkers such as Hild, Bede, Cuthbert, Gildas, and Cædmon philosophers? How did philosophy reach Britain? Who was reading it, who was writing it, who was teaching it, who was learning it? In this seminal exploratory workshop, we will be considering these questions as well as other questions such as: What counts as philosophy in the early medieval British period? What are the boundary/ies between philosophy and
theology? Is there a specifically/uniquely early British philosophical tradition? Just who was reading Alfred’s translation of Boethius?

In this two-day workshop, we will have plenary talks given by:

     Dr. Fred Biggs (Connecticut)
     Dr. Barbara Denison (Shippensburg)
     Dr. Helen Foxhall Forbes (Durham) (tbc)
     Dr. Mary Garrison (York) (tbc)

These talks will set the stage by focusing on some of the intellectual context of early medieval Britain and the contributions of leading figures in early British intellectual history, including Bede, Alcuin, and Hild.

We would like to supplement these invited talks with around 12 contributed talks from scholars (especially junior scholars) from all disciplines, so long as they touch on the matter of philosophy and philosophical writing, teaching, and learning.

Abstracts of no more than 500 words should be sent to Dr. Sara L. Uckelman, s.l.uckelman@durham.ac.uk, by 30 January, 2019. Responses to decisions on abstracts will be communicated by February 15, 2019.

For more information, see http://www.dcamp.uk/britains-early-philosophers/

CFP Fourth Power of the Bishop Conference

The fourth Power of the Bishop conference to be held at Sarum College, Salisbury, May 30-31, 2019. This time, the Power of the Bishop team are joining with the Episcopus Society for the 2019 conference, exploring the theme of Episcopal Patronage from Late Antiquity to c.1500. We want to put together thematic panels that compare and contrast uses, abuses and outcomes of bishops as patrons across time and geographical boundaries

We are looking for papers that explore, but are not limited to:

* Art and architecture

* Music and Liturgy

* Manuscripts and Literary Culture

* Saint Cults and Pilgrimage Routes

* Education and Social Advancement

* Socio-political networks, the advancement of families and individuals

* When episcopal patronage goes wrong – the failures and abuses of episcopal patronage and its results

Abstracts should be no more than 500 words.

This year we are accepting abstracts in English, Italian and French. 

**If selected then papers and book chapters must be in English**

Email abstracts to: powerofthebishop@gmail.com with the subject line ABSTRACT POB4 by no later than 1 February 2019.

For more information and to register: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/pob-4-the-medieval-bishop-as-patron-tickets-53543735755

Joint George Rudé Seminar and the Society for French Historical Studies Conference, Auckland, July 2020

‘France and beyond: the Global World of ‘Ngāti Wīwī’,  7-10 July 2020, Auckland. 
(Tribe ‘Oui Oui’ was the local name for the French in New Zealand.) This first ever Joint George Rudé Seminar and the Society for French Historical Studies Conference will be held in Auckland, hosted by the Universities of Auckland and Massey. Co-presidents Tracy Adams (French) and Kirsty Carpenter, and Treasurer Joe Zizek invite colleagues in History and the Humanities to engage with the themes and the visitors that the conference will bring to New Zealand. Leading scholars from the US, UK and Europe will be keynote guests, and many American and international colleagues have already signalled their intention to attend.

The conference invites panels and papers on any aspect of French History, Medieval to Contemporary (a detailed call for papers will be circulated soon). Areas of traditional French historical research will be featured alongside popular themes: Citizenship in the Medieval and Early Modern European world; the Revolutionary period and its environmental impact in the wider Atlantic world; and changing approaches to French or Franco-British History in the NZ/Australasian and Pacific region – in what the French call Océanie.

Contacts for information:

Tracy Adams t.adams@auckland.ac.nz

Kirsty Carpenter K.Carpenter@massey.ac.nz

Joe Zizek j.zizek@auckland.ac.nz

CFP 20th Australasian Association for Byzantine Studies Conference

Dissidence and Persecution in Byzantium

The 20th Australasian Association for Byzantine Studies Conference, with the theme of Dissidence and Persecution in Byzantium, will be held at Macquarie University, Sydney, July 19-21 2019.

Keynote speakers:
Professor David Olster (University of Kentucky)
Title: The Idolatry of the Jews and the Anti-Judaizing Roots of Seventh- and Early Eighth-Century Iconoclasm
Associate Professor Jitse Dijkstra (University of Ottawa
Title: The Avenging Sword?  Imperial Legislation Against Temples in the Fourth and Fifth Centuries

The Byzantine empire was rarely a stable and harmonious state during its long and eventful history.  It was often in strife with those outside its borders and with those within them, and with so much power invested in its political and ecclesiastical structures it was ready to implode at times.  This could result in persecution and the silencing of dissident voices from various quarters of society.  The mechanisms by which the authorities controlled civil disorder and dissent, as well as discouraging criticism of imperial policies, could be brutal at times.  In what sense was it possible, if at all, to enjoy freedom of speech and action in Byzantium?  Was the law upheld or ignored when vested interests were at stake?  How vulnerable did minorities feel and how conformist was religious belief at the end of the day?  The theme of the conference aims to encourage discussion on a number fronts relating to the use and abuse of power within the history of Byzantium.  Individual papers of 20 mins or panels (3 papers) will be accepted on the following or related themes:

·         The rhetoric of persecution in hagiography and historiography

·         Monastic dissidence and dissidents

·         The persecution of minorities

·         Dissension in the military

·         Imperial usurpation and sedition

·         Discourses of violence and tyranny in literature

·         Popular uprisings and civil disobedience

·         Satire and literary subversion

·         Laws relating to prosecution and capital punishment

·         Depictions of persecution in Byzantine art

·         Slavery and manumission

·         The forced baptism of Jews and others

·         Heresy and the imposition of religious orthodoxy

·         The suppression and oppression of women

·         Persecution of philosophers and other intellectuals

·         Anti-pagan policies

·         Forced migrations and resettlements – Manichaeans and Paulicians

·         The liturgical celebration of martyrdom

Abstracts of 500 words should be emailed to the President of AABS, Dr Ken Parry: conference@aabs.org.au by the due date of 7 January 2019.

Panel convenors should outline briefly their theme (100 words), and (a) add all three abstracts to their application, or (b) list the three speakers on their panel with their own abstract, plus (c) nominate a chairperson.  Panelists should indicate clearly the title of their proposed panel if submitting their abstracts individually.

Acceptances will be despatched by 25 January 2019.

http://www.aabs.org.au/conferences/20th/

CFP Mid-Atlantic Conference on British Studies annual meeting

The MACBS – the mid-Atlantic affiliate of the NACBS, the main organization for British Studies in Canada and the United States – is soliciting proposals for papers and panels on all areas of British Studies for our annual conference at William & Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia on 6-7 April 2019. We welcome participation from scholars of Britain, the British Atlantic World, and the British Empire broadly defined, and we are open to proposals ranging from the ancient to the contemporary and from scholars of history, anthropology, literature, art, politics, economics and related fields. Senior faculty, junior faculty, and graduate students are all encouraged to participate.

Proposals for both individual papers and full panels are welcome. Paper proposals should include a brief (no more than 250 words) abstract of the paper and a curriculum vita. Full panel proposals should also include a one-paragraph description of the panel’s overall aim and indicate which panel member will serve as the organizer and primary contact.

Williamsburg, part of the “Historic Triangle” of communities in Southeast Virginia, is accessible by air, train, and car. It is a lively college town and popular sightseeing destination.

All submissions must be received by 17 December 2018.

Send proposals via email to:

Prof. Stephanie Koscak, Program Co-Chair
Dept. of History
Wake Forest University
koscakse@wfu.edu

Prof. Katie Hindmarch-Watson, Program Co-Chair
Dept. of History
Johns Hopkins University
katie.hw@jhu.edu

Funding for Graduate Students 

We are able to provide limited funding on a needs basis to graduate students presenting papers at the conference. Applicants must be enrolled in good standing at a PhD-granting program and should submit the following information to the program co-chairs by email:

  1. Your name, email address, institution, and name of advisor
  2. Statement of interest and name of conference paper
  3. A budget outlining your approximate conference expenses
  4. A list of funding already received or available for conference travel and expenses

For additional information, please see the MACBS website:
https://www.midatlanticcbs.org/