Category Archives: cfp

CFP 2020 French Shakespeare Society Conference

The organisers invite paper proposals for the 2020 Société Française Shakespeare conference, Paris, Fondation Deutsch de la Meurthe, 9-11 January 2020. The conference theme is Shakespeare and Actors.

“All the world’s a stage, / And all the men and women merely players” (2.7.139-40), says Jaques in As You Like It, suggesting that playing is inherent to life itself. Throughout their dramatic production, Shakespeare and his contemporaries were keen on showcasing the omnipresence of actors while also stressing the instability of their status. As a theatrical practitioner himself, Shakespeare wrote primarily for his company and his rhythmic language was specifically designed for being projected from a stage. It is thus hardly a surprise to find so many metadramatic and metatheatrical allusions on the early modern stage, from the mechanicals in A Midsummer Night’s Dream to the travelling actors in Hamlet, instances of mise en abyme of the theatrical world abound, emphasising the motif of theatrum mundi. Together, they call for a reflection on the uncertain boundaries between stage and life, and on the material conditions surrounding the acting profession.

Early modern playwrights seldom missed an opportunity to play on the uncertainty generated by boy actors performing female parts, given women were excluded from the professional stage until the Restoration. While sometimes joking on the male actors’ cross-dressing, they also subtly rely on the permeability of gendered identities in the theatre to reconfigure desire. “Disguise, I see thou art a wickedness, / Wherein the pregnant enemy does much,” young Viola cries out disguised as a page in Twelfth Night. If the disguise complicates identities and enmeshes the heroine in a love tangle, however, it also conjures up hitherto unknown feelings in her and helps enact what Stephen Greenblatt called “self-fashioning,” namely the shaping of one’s social and sexual identities.

Yet, dramatists did not always judge actors kindly, for their means of livelihood bore the mark of infamy, contrary to poets. In Macbeth, Shakespeare emphasises the frailty of the “poor player, / Who struts and frets his hour upon the stage, / And then is heard no more” (5.5.24-26) and he reminds us of the ephemeral quality of performance. In Hamlet, he makes fun of those who overplay or strive to “bellow” their cues (3.2.2), and finds fault with clowns who improvise at the expense of the playtext. He portrays mediocre, imperfect actors overwhelmed by stage fright, who forget their lines and spoil the part, as in Sonnet 23. We know today that a Renaissance actor’s ability to learn his lines was exceptional. Grammar school education particularly cultivated this skill in children from an early age by making them learn by heart whole segments from the classics. Acting styles were steeped in such rhetoric. Speech acts and passions that were played out on stage were associated with a particular rhetorical form and style, providing a whole repertory of speech codes playwrights used and subverted.

While early modern playwrights nowhere claimed that the most competent actor is the one who best keeps his temper, as Diderot later would in France, some of their characters seem to be born actors in full control of the arts of manipulation and illusion. They are hypocrites in the everyday sense as well as the etymological sense of the term — from the Greek term, ὑποκριτής, hupokritếs, which means “stage actor” or “one who recites”.

In spite of the players’ imperfections at which Shakespeare and his contemporaries delighted in poking fun, showing the play’s seams, playwrights also defended those who brought their own worlds to the stage. Actors certainly needed their support at a time when Puritans were beginning to make themselves heard, threatening the profession. In An Apology for Actors (1612), Thomas Heywood praised the dignity of actors in response to the attacks of such critics as John Northbrooke or Stephen Gosson. An actor had to be multi-talented. He had to memorize, play, sing, dance, improvise, and adjust to the changing material conditions of the stage. Despite very limited rehearsal time, early modern actors were able to produce meaning almost instinctively, and a playwright’s success ultimately depended on the players’ ability to perform their plays. Even today, it is mostly up to actors to update the potentialities of the Shakespearean text and to make characters from the past our contemporaries. French actor Denis Podalydès claims that “Shakespeare is every actor’s dream” (“Shakespeare Album,” La Pléiade, Gallimard, 2016). Playing early modern parts allows actors today to reflect on their own acting style. The actor and his text were indeed front and center in the creative process, in the writing, directing and stage business of early modern companies, which constantly needed to adapt to the changing material conditions of the stage. Such practices may help today’s theatrical practitioners explore the multiple possibilities that are offered to them as they move from page to stage, from collaborative writing to collaborative performance.

This conference aims to bring together early modern scholars, theatre historians, actors, directors and filmmakers to discuss the ways in which early modern drama still enriches our understanding of the actor’s profession and place today in a world which sometimes seems to be nothing but a stage.

Possible topics may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • The actors’ professionalisation in early modern drama
  • Amateur practices in the early modern period and today
  • The material conditions and organisation of theatrical companies
  • The actors’ apprenticeship
  • The versatility of the actors who performed in public, private, court, and itinerant theatrical forms
  • The praise and condemnation of histrionic arts
  • Protection and patronage circuits
  • The place of the comedy actor in society
  • The rhetorical practices of actors on stage
  • Declamation, voice and gestures
  • The mise en abyme of performance and actor figures in early modern plays
  • Historions and jesters in early modern plays
  • Duplicitous and hypocritical characters in early modern plays
  • Great Shakespearean actors, from the 16th century to the present day
  • The experience of acting an early modern part
  • Early modern playwrights and (collaborative) stage writing
  • The representation of Shakespearean actors in popular culture

Scientific committee

Roberta Barker (Dalhousie University), Yan Brailowsky (Université Paris Nanterre, Société Française Shakespeare), Sophie Chiari (Université Clermont Auvergne), Anne-Valérie Dulac (Sorbonne Université), Sarah Hatchuel (Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3, Société Française Shakespeare), Anne-Marie Miller-Blaise (Université Sorbonne Nouvelle-Paris 3), Ladan Niayesh (Université Paris-Diderot), Laetitia Sansonetti (Université Paris Nanterre), Chantal Schütz (École Polytechnique, Société Française Shakespeare), Nathalie Vienne-Guerrin (Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3, Société Française Shakespeare)

Submission procedure

Please send your proposals to contact@societefrancaiseshakespeare.org by 15 May 2019, with a title, an abstract (between 500 and 800 words) and a brief biographical notice. A few words in the abstract should explain in what way(s) your paper intends to address the topic of the conference.

Letters of acceptance will be sent by May 30, 2019. Selected papers are expected to be submitted for publication in the weeks following the conference for our peer-reviewed online series available here: https://journals.openedition.org/shakespeare/32. We accept only proposals which have not been published previously; however, papers initially published by the Société Française Shakespeare may be submitted for publication elsewhere not earlier than 3 months after publication in our online series.

CFP 16th International Congress of Medieval Canon Law

The 16th International Congress of Medieval Canon Law, co-sponsored by ICMAC (Iuris Canonici Medii Aevi Consociatio/International Society of Medieval Canon Law) and Saint Louis University, will take place on the university’s campus in St. Louis, Missouri, USA, from Sunday, July 19, through Saturday, July 25, 2020.

These quadrennial Congresses, alternating sides of the Atlantic, constitute the premier academic conference in the field of medieval canon law. Traditionally they have drawn scholars from many countries, including not only medievalists and canonists, but also those who study related fields, such as Western jurisprudence and legal norms, Roman law, ecclesiastical and papal history, theology and biblical exegesis, manuscript studies, and the history of culture, society, and ideas.

The Academic Committee welcomes proposals for papers or sessions on any topic touching upon medieval canon law, including, but not limited to, the following themes:

  • Texts and Jurisprudence
  • The Influence of the ius commune on the Western Legal Tradition and International Law
  • Canon Law and Local Ecclesiastical History
  • Canon Law, Theology, and Pastoral Care
  • Medieval Law in Comparative Perspective

The chronological focus of the Congress is typically on c. 500 – c. 1500, but select papers or sessions may also be accepted on Early Christian Canon Law and, in light of the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s burning of the Corpus iuris canonici, Canon Law and the Reformation.

The Academic Committee invites proposals for individual 20-minute papers or complete sessions of four 20-minute papers. Papers may be delivered in the following languages: English, French, German, Italian, or Spanish. Scholars not presenting in English are encouraged to utilise PowerPoint presentations and/or to provide written English summaries of their papers.

Regular sessions will not feature papers on text-editing projects. Updates on critical editions or other text-editing projects will be showcased in a poster session during the Congress. Scholars who wish to present on such projects may submit two proposals if they desire, one for the text-editing poster session and another for a regular session.

For further information and submission instructions, please visit the conference website: https://icmcl2020.wordpress.com/

CFP Perth Medieval and Renaissance Group Conference

This year’s conference of the Perth Medieval and Renaissance Group and the UWA Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies will take place on 19 October, 2019. The conference theme is Mental Health in the Medieval and Early Modern World.

Modern stereotypes abound regarding how mental health was perceived during the medieval and early modern period ranging from mental illness being caused by sin to the idea that the attainment of mental well-being could only be achieved through the balancing of the bodily humours. But mental health was a more complex and expansive subject of discourse throughout the period that was widely explored in medical treatises, religious tracts and sermons, and prominent in art and literature, which speaks to a more subtle understanding of the human mental state.

This conference aims to look at both the changing and continuing perceptions of mental health throughout the medieval and early modern period. We welcome papers from the fields of book culture and manuscript studies, history, material culture, medicine, art, and literature, but not limited to, the following broad headings:

  • Suicide
  • Marginal lives
  • Melancholy / Depression
  • Insanity / Mental disorder
  • Rapture / Ecstasy
  • Bodily humours
  • Addiction
  • Anguish
  • Therapies
  • Meditation / Mindfulness / Well-being
  • Imagination
  • Dreams / Visions / Memory
  • Criminality
  • Self-harm
  • Solitude
  • Natural / Kind / Unnatural

The conference organisers invite proposals for 20-minute papers. Please send a paper title, 250-word abstract, and a short (no more than 100-word) biography to: pmrg.cmems.conference@gmail.com by 31 May 2019.

For further information, see the conference flyer posted below and visit the conference website.

Download (PDF, 5.42MB)

CFP New book series: Premodern Transgressive Literatures

Medieval Institute Publications is inviting proposals for a new book series, Premodern Transgressive Literatures. The Series Editor, Alicia Spencer-Hall, and Editorial Board invite both formal proposals for the series, and more informal queries, from all interested parties.

Premodern Transgressive Literatures takes a decisively political, intersectional, and interdisciplinary approach to medieval and early modern literature. The series supports scholarship which transgresses normative bounds along various axes. This includes the transgression of temporal boundaries which superficially separate the premodern era from our twenty-first century moment.

We aim to show, with insistent urgency, the ways in which the premodern can help us make sense of the modern, and the ways in which cutting-edge modern paradigms can help us better understand established, canonical premodern texts. This series is acutely aware of the role of the scholar in the production of history and the crucial importance of the context of scholarly work: the Academy, with its unique characteristics, both positive and negative. As such, Premodern Transgressive Literatures makes space for provocative discussion about the business of producing—and teaching—transgressive work in the neo-liberalised Academy.

We welcome monographs from established and early career researchers, alongside collections of thematic essays, scholarly editions and translations with substantial introductions and apparatus.

Geographical Scope: Global, including but not limited to: Europe, the Mediterranean, Asia
Chronological Scope: Medieval and early modern world
Keywords: intersectionality, interdisciplinary, literature, culture, medieval, early modern, pedagogy
Editorial Board:
Blake Gutt (University of Michigan), Carissa Harris (Temple University), Jonathan Hsy (George Washington University), Roberta Magnani (Swansea University), Elizabeth Robertson (University of Glasgow)

Full details can be found at: www.wmich.edu/medievalpublications/premodern-transgressive-literatures

If you have any general queries or questions about the series, in the first instance please contact Shannon Cunningham (Acquisitions Editor for Medieval Institute Publications), shannon@smcunningham.com.

Please also feel free to contact the Series Editor, Alicia Spencer-Hall, to discuss the series informally and answer any questions regarding academic fit and so forth: aspencerhall@gmail.com.

CFP Historical Reflections/Réflexions Historiques

Historical Reflections/Réflexions Historiques (HRRH) has established a well-deserved reputation for publishing high quality articles of wide-ranging interest for over forty years. The journal, which publishes articles in both English and French, is committed to exploring history in an interdisciplinary framework and with a comparative focus. Historical approaches to art, literature, and the social sciences; the history of mentalities and intellectual movements; the terrain where religion and history meet: these are the subjects to which Historical Reflections is devoted. Contributions are invited from all fields of intellectual-cultural history and the history of religion and mentalities.

Some specific themes include:

  • Music history
  • Social policies and societal change (including studies with a comparative focus)
  • Material culture and emotions
  • Architectural and garden history
  • Small businesses
  • Colonial/imperial studies

Manuscript Submission

The editorial board welcomes submissions for publication in English or French. Authors should submit articles as email attachments, formatted as Microsoft Word or Rich Text Format files. Please note that all correspondence will take place via email. Send submissions and complete contact information to the editor, Elizabeth Macknight at e.macknight@abdn.ac.uk.

Have other questions? Please refer to the various Berghahn Info for Authors pages for general information and guidelines including topics such as article usage and permissions for Berghahn journal article authors (www.berghahnjournals.com/historical-reflections).

Indexed in:

  • Arts & Humanities Citation Index (Web of Science)
  • Scopus
  • Historical Abstracts
  • ERIH PLUS

For a full listing of indices, please visit the website www.berghahnjournals.com/historical-reflections

Contact: info@berghahnjournals.com

CFP Mid-America Medieval Association Conference

Abstracts are invited for the 43rd Mid-America Medieval Association (MAMA) conference, “What Lies Beneath: Uncovering Structures, Subtexts, Skeletons”. The conference will take place on 14 September 2019 at the University of Missouri—Kansas City.

Plenary Speaker, Professor Kathryn Ann Smith, New York University

Papers on any aspect of medieval culture, medieval studies, and medievalism will be considered, but presentations that consider and/or (re)evaluate what lies beneath the surface of the discipline will be particularly welcome. Potential topics could include but are not limited to:

  • discussing excavating bodies in medieval graveyards
  • the structures of medieval books
  • the subtexts of medieval legal treatises
  • the underlying assumptions about race, sex, and gender found in both medieval sources and the scholarly work of medievalists
  • the underlying influences on medieval poetry
  • the foundations of the medieval motet
  • the materials used in producing goods
  • what “lies beneath” the profession of medieval studies

Proposals for either papers (abstracts limited to 250 words) or sessions (abstracts limited to 250 words along with a list of titles and presenters) should be sent via email attachment (MS Word preferred) to Linda Mitchell: mitchellli@umkc.edu

Deadline for proposals is 25 June 2019.

Symposium: The Surrounding Forest – Trees in the Medieval Imaginary

Registration is now open for the symposium The Surrounding Forest: Trees in the Medieval Imaginary. This will take place at Birkbeck College, University of London on 22 June, 2019 and is hosted by Medieval Ecocriticisms and N/EMICS.

This one-day symposium aims to explore the image of the tree as a conduit for the exploration of human engagements with environment in the global middle ages, broadly defined, and seeks to encourage cross-cultural, trans-national, and interdisciplinary understanding of the role of trees, woodland, and other vegetation in various contexts. We want to better understand human responses to nature. What is it about ‘arboreal beauty’ that connects it with the divine? Recognized across cultures as axis mundi, the tree shoots upwards, its trunk and branches stretching, reaching, growing towards the light as it seeks to bridge the in-between space that divides earth from the heavens. The liminal quality of foliage, trees, and forests is recognized by artists and weavers of images across the world.

A full programme can be downloaded below.
Please register at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/the-surrounding-forest-trees-in-the-medieval-imaginary-tickets-59037494736

For further information, see:
https://northernemics.wordpress.com/the-surrounding-forest-trees-in-the-medieval-imaginary/

http://www.bbk.ac.uk/events/remote_event_view?id=5308

Download (PDF, 2.4MB)

Call for contributors English Consorts: Power, Influence, Dynasty

The editors of English Consorts: Power, Influence, Dynasty – a four-volume series to be published in Palgrave Macmillan’s “Queenship and Power” series – are still seeking abstracts for a number of consorts. A revised Call for Contributors has been issued with a deadline of 1 May 2019.

English Consorts: Power, Influence, Dynasty aims to provide short, focused, well-researched, and refereed biographies of all of the English consorts since the Conquest. While the editors are keen to hear from prospective authors on any consort, they are especially looking for submissions on:

Norman to Early Plantagenet Consorts:
Margaret of France (wife of Henry the Young King)
Isabella of Gloucester (wife of King John)

Later Plantagenet and the Wars of the Roses Consorts:
Isabella de Valois

Tudor and Stuart Consorts:
Elizabeth of York
Katherine of Aragon
Elizabeth Cromwell and Dorothy Cromwell (a double-biography of the wives of the Lords Protectors Cromwell)

Hanoverian to Windsor Consorts:
Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz
Caroline of Brunswick
Queen Elizabeth, The Queen Mother
Prince Philip, The Duke of Edinburgh

The Editors are happy to field questions and queries and can be contacted at: englishconsorts@gmail.com

Full details are available at the project website: https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/ren/about_us/centrestaff/norrie-consorts

CFP International conference on music iconography

Paper proposals are invited for the International Conference of Association RIdIM 2019 on “Belonging and Detachment: Representing Musical Identity in Visual Culture”.
The conference will take place in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, 13-15 November 2019.

Musicians and artists rarely operate in complete isolation. Throughout history they have negotiated power structures and geographical circumstances, and these factors remain influential in the digital age.

The 19th International Conference of Association RIdIM seeks to examine the ways in which musicians and artists experience ‘belonging’ and ‘detachment’ – be it socially, politically, geographically, artistically, aesthetically and/or philosophically. The primary concern of the conference is how such experiences impact upon the representation of musical identity in visual culture.

As the current global crisis of mass migration and displacement highlights many different experiences of belonging and detachment, Association RIdIM invites submissions on all aspects of this theme relating to the representation of musical identity in visual culture. It hopes to foster a dialogue between scholars and practitioners and calls for paper proposals from diverse participants including musicologists, art historians and theorists, curators, performers, composers and artists.

Topics related to the conference theme might include:

  • The Other and Otherness
  • Centre and Periphery
  • Migration, Displacement, Diaspora
  • Multiculturalism, Cultural Pluralism and Transculturalism
  • Colonialism and Post-Colonialism
  • Music, Class and Power
  • Networks and Patronage
  • Artistic Hierarchies
  • Curatorial Practice
  • Considerations on Music Iconography as a Discipline
  • Music, Art and Empathy

Proposals are welcomed from visual artists and musicians addressing the ways in which the conference theme is approached in their own work.

Deadline for abstract submission: 1 April 2019.
For further information, including details of conference awards, see the RIdIM website.

CFP Romantic Studies Association of Australiasia 2019 Conference

Proposals are invited for the the fifth biennial RSAA conference in Canberra, Australia, 21-23 November 2019. The conference theme is ‘Embodying Romanticism’.

Although the body has preoccupied literary scholarship for some time, there has been a renewed attention in Romantic studies to the complex ways in which literature encodes and reproduces our awareness of embodied experience. Challenging views of Romanticism as bounded by visionary and idealist expression, such work reflects a reorientation of criticism around the materiality of Romantic culture, whether configured as part of the age of sensibility or in relation to the era’s natural and social sciences. The Romantic period was, moreover, a time when control of the body emerged as a key political issue in workshops, homes, battlefields and colonies, when bodies were subject to rapidly evolving ideas of gender, class and race, while new bodies of knowledge and corporate political bodies emerged to regulate the affairs of nations and empires. This was a period when bodies were subject to ever more intensive modes of analysis and management, at the same time that bodies imposed their transgressive physicality through new understandings of environments, vitalism, trauma, slavery, disease and taste. Attentive to such developments, Romantic studies in turn dovetails with a broader materialist emphasis that explores how bodies are shaped in relation to affect, biopolitics, speculative realism, post-humanism and eco-criticism. Alain Badiou has recently proposed that our modern, liberal ideology can today only perceive two objects: bodies and language. Aligning itself at the conjuncture of these two terms, this conference invites papers that broadly consider how embodiment was evoked, challenged and understood in Romantic cultural life.

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers on any aspects of Romanticism and embodiment. Proposals may be for individual papers or for panels of 3-4 papers.

Abstracts of approximately 250 words are due by 30 June 2019. Please send abstracts to the conference convenor, Neil Ramsey, at n.ramsey@unsw.edu.au

Postgraduate bursaries are available. See the conference website for details: https://www.unsw.adfa.edu.au/conferences/rsaa/postgraduate-bursaries