Category Archives: cfp

CFP Mid-Atlantic Conference on British Studies annual meeting

The MACBS – the mid-Atlantic affiliate of the NACBS, the main organization for British Studies in Canada and the United States – is soliciting proposals for papers and panels on all areas of British Studies for our annual conference at William & Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia on 6-7 April 2019. We welcome participation from scholars of Britain, the British Atlantic World, and the British Empire broadly defined, and we are open to proposals ranging from the ancient to the contemporary and from scholars of history, anthropology, literature, art, politics, economics and related fields. Senior faculty, junior faculty, and graduate students are all encouraged to participate.

Proposals for both individual papers and full panels are welcome. Paper proposals should include a brief (no more than 250 words) abstract of the paper and a curriculum vita. Full panel proposals should also include a one-paragraph description of the panel’s overall aim and indicate which panel member will serve as the organizer and primary contact.

Williamsburg, part of the “Historic Triangle” of communities in Southeast Virginia, is accessible by air, train, and car. It is a lively college town and popular sightseeing destination.

All submissions must be received by 17 December 2018.

Send proposals via email to:

Prof. Stephanie Koscak, Program Co-Chair
Dept. of History
Wake Forest University
koscakse@wfu.edu

Prof. Katie Hindmarch-Watson, Program Co-Chair
Dept. of History
Johns Hopkins University
katie.hw@jhu.edu

Funding for Graduate Students 

We are able to provide limited funding on a needs basis to graduate students presenting papers at the conference. Applicants must be enrolled in good standing at a PhD-granting program and should submit the following information to the program co-chairs by email:

  1. Your name, email address, institution, and name of advisor
  2. Statement of interest and name of conference paper
  3. A budget outlining your approximate conference expenses
  4. A list of funding already received or available for conference travel and expenses

For additional information, please see the MACBS website:
https://www.midatlanticcbs.org/

CFP Professional Historians’ Association of NZ Annual Conference

To mark 25 years since the establishment of the Professional Historians’ Association of New Zealand/Aotearoa (PHANZA), the association invites papers for a conference on the theme ‘After the War: What’s Next?’, exploring the current and future state of public history in New Zealand. The conference will be held at the Wellington campus of Massey University on 13-14 April, 2019.

Following four years of war commemorations and the many research and work opportunities the centenary of World War I provided, where does history go next? What research opportunities await public historians and what challenges will present themselves? The conference will be an opportunity to investigate the future of public history in New Zealand.

Call for papers
We invite papers that address the conference theme from PHANZA members, the academic community, post-graduate students and any other practitioners of public history.

The deadline for proposals is Friday 21 December 2018.

Please email abstracts (not more than 200 words) for consideration to the Secretary at secretary@phanza.org.nz. Please also provide your full name, affiliation (if relevant), a brief bio, and contact details. Papers should fit the format of a 20 minute presentation, followed by 10 minutes for questions.

Presenters will be advised in early 2019 if their paper has been accepted.

CFP Australian Historical Association Conference 2019

The 38th Australian Historical Association (AHA) Conference, ‘Local Communities, Global Networks’, will be held 8-12 July 2019, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba.

How have the local and the global intersected, inspired and transformed experiences within and from Australia’s history? How do the histories of Indigenous, imperial, migrant and the myriad of other communities and networks inform, contest and shape knowledge about Australia today? The conference theme speaks to the centrality of History for engaging with community and family networks. Constructing livelihoods within an empire and a nation that have had a global reach, local communities have responded in diverse ways. The varieties of historical enquiry into this past enrich our understanding of Australian and world history.

We welcome paper and panel proposals on any geographical area, time period, or field of history, on the conference theme ‘Local Communities, Global Networks’.

Abstracts due 28 February 2019. For further information and to submit an abstract, see the conference website: https://www.usq.edu.au/events/2019/07/local-communities-global-networks/

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CFP Council of Graduate Art Historians annual symposium

The Council of Graduate Art Historians at Arizona State University will host its 13th annual Art History Graduate Symposium “Displacement: Art Through the Lens of Borders and Exchange” on Saturday, April 6, 2019.

“As both a material and conceptualizing space, the border is a locus that maps power relations and control; it is a place of conflict and transgression and a site of anxiety.”
– Judith Rugg, artist and art theorist, in her book Exploring Site-Specific Art.

CoGAH intends to address and investigate these anxieties through our interdisciplinary symposium exploring concepts of borders and exchange within visual and material culture. Submissions to the symposium should consider movement, migration, relocation/dislocation, memory, syncretism, hybridity, and/or any other subject related to borders and exchange within material and visual culture. We will accept papers that consider: real or imagined, implied or disputed, historical or apocryphal, the liminal and transliminal borders and spaces, and their circulations.

CoGAH invites graduate students from all disciplines to submit. We encourage submissions from any period, media, or discipline associated with the aforementioned topics related to borders and exchange through a lens of material and visual culture.

Abstracts should be no more than 350 words for presentations up to twenty minutes in duration. Please include a CV and submit your materials to cogahASU@gmail.com by 15 December, 2018.

Announcement for keynote speaker is forthcoming.

Presenters will be notified by January 15, 2019.

The symposium will be held on Arizona State University’s campus.

CFP Histories of the Senses

The editors of the Journal of the Canadian Historical Association invite submissions for papers on “Histories of the Senses” to be delivered as a panel at the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Historical Association, 3-5 June 2019, at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada.

We welcome papers that focus on any time period and geographical location, from both early career researchers and established scholars. Papers will be 20 minutes in length and may be delivered in either English or French. As invited members of this panel, presenters will be encouraged to submit their papers for publication in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the Canadian Historical Association.

Please submit an abstract of no more than 300 words along with a CV of 1-2 pages to Mairi Cowan, at mairi.cowan@utoronto.ca, by 7 December.

 

Call for contributors for English Consorts: Power, Influence, Dynasty (Palgrave)

English Consorts: Power, Influence, Dynasty is a four-volume series—intended for Palgrave Macmillan’s “Queenship and Power” series—that aims to provide short, focused, well-researched, and refereed biographies of all of the English consorts since the Conquest.

Editors: Aidan Norrie, Carolyn Harris, Joanna Laynesmith, Danna Messer, and Elena Woodacre

Call for Contributors:

The Penguin Monarchs series is the latest in a long line of publications that have focused on the monarchs of England. The Penguin series, in particular, has generally been successful in combining scholarly research with readability and accessibility, often because the authors have chosen a particular lens to view the monarch through, giving the biographies more focus.

The Penguin Monarchs series, however, shines a light on what is generally still missing from studies of the English monarchy: the role of the consort. While the last decade has seen a plethora of both scholarly and popular biographies published on England’s consorts, there is no single, scholarly compendium where all the consorts since the Norman Conquest can be consulted: it is this curious lacuna that English Consorts: Power, Influence, Dynasty seeks to fill, creating a vital reference work for scholars, students, and the interested public.

English Consorts: Power, Influence, Dynasty is a four-volume series—intended for Palgrave Macmillan’s “Queenship and Power” series—that aims to provide short, focused, well-researched, and refereed biographies of all of the English consorts since the Conquest. Edited by a team of queenship experts and historians of monarchy, each of the volumes (Volume 1: Early Medieval Consorts; Volume 2: Later Medieval Consorts; Volume 3: Tudor and Stuart Consorts; Volume 4: Hanoverian to Windsor Consorts) will include biographical essays, as well as commissioned essays from leading experts on various thematic topics. We are interested in both male and female consorts, but can only include essays related to the spouses of a reigning monarch: as such, Anne Hyde and Sophia Dorothea of Celle will not be included, but we plan to include an essay on Margaret of France, wife of Henry the Young King.

Like the Penguin Monarchs books, however, each of the essays must have a lens through which the consort is viewed. Rather than simply replicating the consort’s entry in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, readers should come away from each essay with a sense of what was unique to, or ‘special’ about, a particular consort. For instance, the essay on Elizabeth of York could be sub-titled ‘The Unifier’, and focus on her role in the ending of the Wars of the Roses, or instead ‘Daughter, Sister, Niece, Wife, and Mother of Kings’, and focus on her political, social, and religious influence during her life. Likewise, the essay on Philip II could be sub-titled ‘The First Male Consort’, or instead, ‘King and Consort’.

Potential authors may submit abstracts for more than one consort. We ask, however, that the abstracts all be sent as attachments to the same email, with the chapters ranked in preference. Proposed chapter titles should take the format of the consort’s name, followed by a colon, followed by the brief sub-title that signifies to the reader the chapter’s focus. We also plan to include some thematic essays that take a particular angle, and consider the consorts from an entire dynasty together. Interested authors may wish to also submit an abstract for one of these essays.

Please send chapter abstracts of no more than 250 words, accompanied by a brief biography, for essays between 6000 and 7500 words (including references) to englishconsorts@gmail.com by 1 May 2019. Accepted authors will be notified by mid-July 2019, and completed essays will be due to the volume’s editor by 1 June 2020.

We are keen to hear from scholars regardless of their career stage or situation, and encourage submissions from specialists from a range of disciplines (including, but not limited to, history, literary studies, art history, archaeology, race studies, and the performing arts).

Thematic Essay Topics:

In relation to the thematic essay topics, we have some fairly solid ideas for the content we want covered. To help out potential contributors, the following essay topics are currently in need of an author:

  • Consorts as Regents, Patrons, and Parents
  • The Hanoverian Consorts
  • The Windsor Consorts

While the content and coverage of the essay is fairly fixed, we are interested in a wide range of angles and approaches. Please don’t hesitate to get in touch if you have any questions, or have an idea you’d like to run past us. We are also happy to receive abstracts for co-authored pieces.

Queens of England Series:

Authors might also be interested in submitting proposals to the upcoming monograph series on the Queens of England, published by Routledge, and edited by Ellie Woodacre and Louise Wilkinson. For more information, see here, or contact Ellie at: Ellie.Woodacre@winchester.ac.uk.

CFP Scientiae: Early Modern Knowledge

Scientiae is the interdisciplinary conference on intellectual culture, 1400-1800. It is centred on, but not limited to, developments in the early modern natural sciences. Philosophers, historians, literary scholars and others are invited to share their perspectives on this vital period. The eighth annual meeting will be held at Queen’s University, Belfast on 12 – 15 June 2019.

Plenary addresses by:

Ingrid Rowland (Notre Dame/Rome) and Rob Iliffe (Oxford)

and plenary panels led by:

Subha Mukherji (Cambridge) and Marco Sgarbi, Pietro Daniel Omodeo, and Craig Martin (Venice).

The steering committee seeks proposals for:

  • Individual (20-minute) papers: Please submit a descriptive title, 250-word abstract, and one-page CV.
  • Complete panels: Same as above for each paper, plus 150-word rationale for the panel. Maximum four panellists, plus chair (and/or respondent).
  • Workshops: One-page CV for each workshop leader, plus 250-word plan for the session: topic, techniques, hands-on resources, etc.
  • Seminars: One-page CV for each seminar leader, plus 250-word rationale for the session: its topic, and its suitability for treatment in seminar format.

Proposals should be sent to pertransibunt@gmail.com by 30 December, 2018. The committee will respond by the end of January. For more information, and the conference poster, see http://scientiae.co.uk.

CFP Gender, Memory and Documentary Culture, 900-1200

The John Rylands Research Institute Annual Conference 2019, ‘Gender, Memory and Documentary Culture 900-1200’, co-sponsored by the Haskins Society, will be held at the John Rylands Library, Manchester, UK 28-29 June, 2019.

This conference brings together aspects of gender and documentary culture between the tenth and the twelfth centuries that we believe inform and engage each other, but are often studied in isolation. Although the field of medieval gender studies is an active and well-populated one, less attention is given to the role gender played in the commissioning, use and preservation of documents, whether manuscript books or other types of documentary materials. Did medieval men and women interact with documentary culture in the same way? The texture of the relationship between gender and documentary cultures has yet to be teased out, and it is hoped that this conference will provide an ideal forum to advance this field.

Paper proposals on the following broad themes are invited:

  • Lay and ecclesiastical manuscript cultures
  • Rhetorical agency
  • Documentary genre and gender
  • Manuscript and cartulary production and dissemination
  • Gendered use of manuscripts (including commissioning, production and dissemination of women’s secular and monastic writing)
  • The gendering of memory
  • Documentary artifacts as material culture.

We are pleased to announce our plenary speakers:

  • Constance B. Bouchard (University of Akron)
  • Steven Vanderputten (Ghent University)

Paper submissions that utilize resources held at the John Rylands Library (http://www.library.manchester.ac.uk/search-resources/guide-to-special-collections/manuscripts-and-archives/ ) are especially welcome, as are submissions from Early Career Researchers.

To offer a paper, please send an abstract of 250 words to one of the organisers by 1 December 2018:
Laura Gathagan laura.gathagan@cortland.edu or
Charles Insley charles.insley@manchester.ac.uk

The cost of the conference will be £65, with reduced fees for postgraduate students and Haskins Society members.

CFP French Journal of Medieval English Studies

The French Journal of Medieval English Studies Etudes Médiévales Anglaises is seeking submissions for its 94th issue, focusing on the notion of “space”. The papers, written in French or English, should be submitted by 30 May, 2019 (see more information below). Authors who wish to submit a paper are advised to get in touch and submit a title with a brief description of content as soon as convenient.

Though space is by no means a medieval concept (in fourteenth-century use, the word referred primarily to time, or to an interval between two objects, rather than to the abstract idea of an extended area that can be filled or crossed), the concept in its complexity has over the last decades gained considerable critical importance in medieval studies. Medievalists have always paid attention to spatial questions, namely in the shape of inquiries into the location of national or religious communities, into medieval practices of pilgrimages, processions and travels, or into the symbolic associations of various places (the forest, the garden, the castle…). However, “critical reflection on spatial concepts and categories” has developed more recently with the rise of cultural geography in the 1970s (Weiss & Salih, 2012, xv), and subsequent postmodern explorations of the ideological assumptions which defined and produced medieval urban and rural spaces, places of power and sites of piety and fashioned social and gendered spaces within these wider areas.

In this context, scholars set out to explore the “heterogeneity and flux of medieval spatial paradigms” (Cohen & Madeline, 2014, 7). Interdisciplinary approaches flourished, as scholars were drawing together geographical, literary and cultural studies. A renewed awareness of the importance of networks which extend beyond “national” identities led to a re-appraisal of the formation of Europe (Wallace, 2016), while readings drawing on post-colonial theory also re-examined medieval discourses on the other, whether inside or outside Europe (Conklin-Akbari, 2009). Interest in spatial studies also fostered analyses of “topographies of power” (de Jong & Theuws, 2001) and of the organization of sacred and secular spaces, in particular in relation to medieval assumptions about social and gender divisions (Gilchrist, 1994). In more recent years, ecocriticism has helped diversify the perspective on space by opening critical discourse to preoccupations with nature (Cohen, 2015).

A pervasive, multifaceted concept in medieval studies, space offers insight into countless aspects of medieval society, from political institutions and the staging of power to rising attempts at defining individuality, from archaeological studies of social spaces to literary approaches of imaginary cartographies.

Etudes Médiévales Anglaises invites papers from all disciplinary backgrounds on medieval conceptions and practices of space in the British Isles, including:

  • Conceptualising space
    • Medieval astronomical conceptions of the world.
    • The British contribution to the rise of geography and cartography.
    • What is a kingdom? Attempts at defining kingdoms, namely in the context of shifting territorial extension.
    • Forming a sense of community (Christendom, national identity) in the Middle Ages.
  • Fashioning space
    • Bordering territory in the British Isles in the Middle Ages: techniques, theories and practices.
    • Urban, rural, architectural ways of fashioning space; their social, political, religious and cultural implications.
    • The rise of the individual and the advent of intimacy.
    • Economic networks, insular and European; their influences on daily life in diverse contexts.
    • Religious and cultural networks.
  • Medieval practices of space
    • Social and religious practices: processions, pilgrimages and travels, either real or imagined.
    • Gendered practices of public and private space in the British Middle Ages.
    • Space and war: how did British knights envisage the necessary military engagement with space?
    • The sea: medieval practices and representation of seafaring in the context of medieval conceptions of the sea, real or imagined.
    • The forest and the “wilderness”: places outside social order, which are often fraught with danger and / or prove the loci for spiritual experience (hermitages) or adventure (namely in the case of encounters with fairy and other supernatural beings)

Submission information

The papers, written in English or in French, must be sent before 30 May, 2019 to Fanny Moghaddassi f.moghaddassi@unistra.fr . Etudes Médiévales Anglaises uses double-blind peer review. The stylesheet to be used may be found on our website: https://amaes.jimdo.com/submit-a-paper/

References:

COHEN Jeffrey J., Stone: An Ecology of the Inhuman, University of Minnesota Press, 2015.

COHEN Meredith and MADELINE Fanny, eds, Space in the Medieval West. Places, Territories and Imagined Geographies, Routledge, 2014.

CONKLIN AKBARI, Suzanne, Idols in the East, European Representations of Islam and the Orient, 1100-1450, Cornell University Press, 2009.

Construction de l’espace au Moyen Âge : Pratiques et représentations, Colloque de la SHMESP (Mulhouse, 2006), Presses universitaires de la Sorbonne, 2007.

DE JONG Mayke and THEUWS Frans, eds., Topographies of Power in the Early Middle Ages, Brill, Transformation of the Roman World, 6, 2001.

GAUTIER DALCHE Patrick, L’Espace géographique au Moyen Âge¸ Sismel Edizioni del Galluzo, Micrologus’ Library, 57, 2013.

GILCHRIST Roberta, Gender and Material Culture, The Archaelogy of Religious Women, Routledge, 1994.

HANAWALT Barbara A. & KOLBIALKA Michal, Medieval Practices of Space, University of Minessota Press, 2000.

Uomo e spazio nell alto medioevo, Settimane Di Studio Del Centro Italiano di Studi Sull’ Alto Medioevo, Presso La Sede dell Centro, 2002.

WALLACE David, ed., Europe: A Literary History, 1348-1418, Oxford University Press, 2 vol., 2016.

WEISS Julian and SALIH Sarah, eds., Locating the Middle Ages, The Spaces and Places of Medieval Culture, Boydell & Brewer, King’s College London Centre for Late Antique and Medieval Studies, 2012.

ZUMTHOR Paul, La Mesure du monde, Représentation de l’espace au Moyen Âge, Seuil, 1993.

Parergon call for proposals: Special themed issues

The ANZAMEMS’ journal Parergon (https://parergon.org/) produces one open issue and one themed issue annually. We now call for proposals for future themed issues, specifically for 2021 (38.2)

Recent themed issues include: 

  • 2016, 33.2 Approaches to Early Modern Nostalgia, guest-edited by Kristine Johanson
  • 2017, 34.2 Exile and Imprisonment in Medieval and Early Modern Europe, guest-edited by Lisa Di Crescenzo and Sally Fisher
  • 2018, 35.2 Translating Medieval Cultures Across Time and Place: A Global Perspective, guest-edited by Saher Amer, Esther S. Klein, and Hélène Sirantoine

Parergon publishes articles on all aspects of medieval and early modern studies, from early medieval through to the eighteenth century, and including the reception and influence of medieval and early modern culture in the modern world. We are particularly interested in research that takes new approaches and crosses traditional disciplinary boundaries.

Parergon asks its authors to achieve international standards of excellence. The article should be substantially original, advance research in the field, and have the potential to make a significant contribution to the critical debate.

Parergon is available in electronic form as part of Project Muse, Australian Public Affairs – Full Text (from 1994), and Humanities Full Text (from 2008). Parergon is included in the Clarivate Analytics Master Journal List of refereed journals and in the European Reference Index for the Humanities (ERIH), and is indexed for nine major database services, including ABELL, IMB and Scopus. 

Themed issues contain up to ten essays, plus the usual reviews section. The guest editor is responsible for setting the theme and drawing up the criteria for the essays. 

Time line 

Proposals for the 2021 issue (38.2) should be submitted to the Editor susan.broomhall@uwa.edu.au by Friday 1 February 2019.

Proposals should contain the following: 

  1. A draft title for the issue.
  2. A statement outlining the rationale for the issue.
  3. Titles and abstracts of all the essays.
  4. A short biographical paragraph for the guest editor(s) and for each contributor.

Proposals will be considered by a selection panel drawn from the Parergon International Editorial Board who will be asked to assess and rank the proposals according to the following criteria:

  1. Suitability for the journal
  2. Originality of contribution to the chosen field
  3. Significance/importance of the proposed theme
  4. Potential for advancing scholarship in a new and exciting way
  5. Range and quality of authors

Guest editors will be notified of the result of their application by the beginning of April 2019. 

The editorial process 

Once a proposal has been accepted: 

  1. The guest editor will commission and pre-select the essays before submitting them to the Parergon Editor by the agreed date (for issue 38.2, 1 June 2020).
  2. The Parergon Editor will arrange for independent and anonymous peer-review in accordance with the journal’s established criteria.
  3. Occasionally a commissioned essay will be judged not suitable for publication in Parergon. This decision will be taken by the Parergon Editor, based on the anonymous expert reviews.
  4. Essays that have already been published or accepted for publication elsewhere are not eligible for inclusion in the journal.

Please send enquiries and proposals to the Editor, Susan Broomhall, at susan.broomhall@uwa.edu.au

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