Category Archives: cfp

CFP Perth Medieval and Renaissance Group Conference

This year’s conference of the Perth Medieval and Renaissance Group and the UWA Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies will take place on 19 October, 2019. The conference theme is Mental Health in the Medieval and Early Modern World.

Modern stereotypes abound regarding how mental health was perceived during the medieval and early modern period ranging from mental illness being caused by sin to the idea that the attainment of mental well-being could only be achieved through the balancing of the bodily humours. But mental health was a more complex and expansive subject of discourse throughout the period that was widely explored in medical treatises, religious tracts and sermons, and prominent in art and literature, which speaks to a more subtle understanding of the human mental state.

This conference aims to look at both the changing and continuing perceptions of mental health throughout the medieval and early modern period. We welcome papers from the fields of book culture and manuscript studies, history, material culture, medicine, art, and literature, but not limited to, the following broad headings:

  • Suicide
  • Marginal lives
  • Melancholy / Depression
  • Insanity / Mental disorder
  • Rapture / Ecstasy
  • Bodily humours
  • Addiction
  • Anguish
  • Therapies
  • Meditation / Mindfulness / Well-being
  • Imagination
  • Dreams / Visions / Memory
  • Criminality
  • Self-harm
  • Solitude
  • Natural / Kind / Unnatural

The conference organisers invite proposals for 20-minute papers. Please send a paper title, 250-word abstract, and a short (no more than 100-word) biography to: pmrg.cmems.conference@gmail.com by 31 May 2019.

For further information, see the conference flyer posted below and visit the conference website.

Download (PDF, 5.42MB)

CFP New book series: Premodern Transgressive Literatures

Medieval Institute Publications is inviting proposals for a new book series, Premodern Transgressive Literatures. The Series Editor, Alicia Spencer-Hall, and Editorial Board invite both formal proposals for the series, and more informal queries, from all interested parties.

Premodern Transgressive Literatures takes a decisively political, intersectional, and interdisciplinary approach to medieval and early modern literature. The series supports scholarship which transgresses normative bounds along various axes. This includes the transgression of temporal boundaries which superficially separate the premodern era from our twenty-first century moment.

We aim to show, with insistent urgency, the ways in which the premodern can help us make sense of the modern, and the ways in which cutting-edge modern paradigms can help us better understand established, canonical premodern texts. This series is acutely aware of the role of the scholar in the production of history and the crucial importance of the context of scholarly work: the Academy, with its unique characteristics, both positive and negative. As such, Premodern Transgressive Literatures makes space for provocative discussion about the business of producing—and teaching—transgressive work in the neo-liberalised Academy.

We welcome monographs from established and early career researchers, alongside collections of thematic essays, scholarly editions and translations with substantial introductions and apparatus.

Geographical Scope: Global, including but not limited to: Europe, the Mediterranean, Asia
Chronological Scope: Medieval and early modern world
Keywords: intersectionality, interdisciplinary, literature, culture, medieval, early modern, pedagogy
Editorial Board:
Blake Gutt (University of Michigan), Carissa Harris (Temple University), Jonathan Hsy (George Washington University), Roberta Magnani (Swansea University), Elizabeth Robertson (University of Glasgow)

Full details can be found at: www.wmich.edu/medievalpublications/premodern-transgressive-literatures

If you have any general queries or questions about the series, in the first instance please contact Shannon Cunningham (Acquisitions Editor for Medieval Institute Publications), shannon@smcunningham.com.

Please also feel free to contact the Series Editor, Alicia Spencer-Hall, to discuss the series informally and answer any questions regarding academic fit and so forth: aspencerhall@gmail.com.

CFP Historical Reflections/Réflexions Historiques

Historical Reflections/Réflexions Historiques (HRRH) has established a well-deserved reputation for publishing high quality articles of wide-ranging interest for over forty years. The journal, which publishes articles in both English and French, is committed to exploring history in an interdisciplinary framework and with a comparative focus. Historical approaches to art, literature, and the social sciences; the history of mentalities and intellectual movements; the terrain where religion and history meet: these are the subjects to which Historical Reflections is devoted. Contributions are invited from all fields of intellectual-cultural history and the history of religion and mentalities.

Some specific themes include:

  • Music history
  • Social policies and societal change (including studies with a comparative focus)
  • Material culture and emotions
  • Architectural and garden history
  • Small businesses
  • Colonial/imperial studies

Manuscript Submission

The editorial board welcomes submissions for publication in English or French. Authors should submit articles as email attachments, formatted as Microsoft Word or Rich Text Format files. Please note that all correspondence will take place via email. Send submissions and complete contact information to the editor, Elizabeth Macknight at e.macknight@abdn.ac.uk.

Have other questions? Please refer to the various Berghahn Info for Authors pages for general information and guidelines including topics such as article usage and permissions for Berghahn journal article authors (www.berghahnjournals.com/historical-reflections).

Indexed in:

  • Arts & Humanities Citation Index (Web of Science)
  • Scopus
  • Historical Abstracts
  • ERIH PLUS

For a full listing of indices, please visit the website www.berghahnjournals.com/historical-reflections

Contact: info@berghahnjournals.com

CFP Mid-America Medieval Association Conference

Abstracts are invited for the 43rd Mid-America Medieval Association (MAMA) conference, “What Lies Beneath: Uncovering Structures, Subtexts, Skeletons”. The conference will take place on 14 September 2019 at the University of Missouri—Kansas City.

Plenary Speaker, Professor Kathryn Ann Smith, New York University

Papers on any aspect of medieval culture, medieval studies, and medievalism will be considered, but presentations that consider and/or (re)evaluate what lies beneath the surface of the discipline will be particularly welcome. Potential topics could include but are not limited to:

  • discussing excavating bodies in medieval graveyards
  • the structures of medieval books
  • the subtexts of medieval legal treatises
  • the underlying assumptions about race, sex, and gender found in both medieval sources and the scholarly work of medievalists
  • the underlying influences on medieval poetry
  • the foundations of the medieval motet
  • the materials used in producing goods
  • what “lies beneath” the profession of medieval studies

Proposals for either papers (abstracts limited to 250 words) or sessions (abstracts limited to 250 words along with a list of titles and presenters) should be sent via email attachment (MS Word preferred) to Linda Mitchell: mitchellli@umkc.edu

Deadline for proposals is 25 June 2019.

Symposium: The Surrounding Forest – Trees in the Medieval Imaginary

Registration is now open for the symposium The Surrounding Forest: Trees in the Medieval Imaginary. This will take place at Birkbeck College, University of London on 22 June, 2019 and is hosted by Medieval Ecocriticisms and N/EMICS.

This one-day symposium aims to explore the image of the tree as a conduit for the exploration of human engagements with environment in the global middle ages, broadly defined, and seeks to encourage cross-cultural, trans-national, and interdisciplinary understanding of the role of trees, woodland, and other vegetation in various contexts. We want to better understand human responses to nature. What is it about ‘arboreal beauty’ that connects it with the divine? Recognized across cultures as axis mundi, the tree shoots upwards, its trunk and branches stretching, reaching, growing towards the light as it seeks to bridge the in-between space that divides earth from the heavens. The liminal quality of foliage, trees, and forests is recognized by artists and weavers of images across the world.

A full programme can be downloaded below.
Please register at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/the-surrounding-forest-trees-in-the-medieval-imaginary-tickets-59037494736

For further information, see:
https://northernemics.wordpress.com/the-surrounding-forest-trees-in-the-medieval-imaginary/

http://www.bbk.ac.uk/events/remote_event_view?id=5308

Download (PDF, 2.4MB)

Call for contributors English Consorts: Power, Influence, Dynasty

The editors of English Consorts: Power, Influence, Dynasty – a four-volume series to be published in Palgrave Macmillan’s “Queenship and Power” series – are still seeking abstracts for a number of consorts. A revised Call for Contributors has been issued with a deadline of 1 May 2019.

English Consorts: Power, Influence, Dynasty aims to provide short, focused, well-researched, and refereed biographies of all of the English consorts since the Conquest. While the editors are keen to hear from prospective authors on any consort, they are especially looking for submissions on:

Norman to Early Plantagenet Consorts:
Margaret of France (wife of Henry the Young King)
Isabella of Gloucester (wife of King John)

Later Plantagenet and the Wars of the Roses Consorts:
Isabella de Valois

Tudor and Stuart Consorts:
Elizabeth of York
Katherine of Aragon
Elizabeth Cromwell and Dorothy Cromwell (a double-biography of the wives of the Lords Protectors Cromwell)

Hanoverian to Windsor Consorts:
Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz
Caroline of Brunswick
Queen Elizabeth, The Queen Mother
Prince Philip, The Duke of Edinburgh

The Editors are happy to field questions and queries and can be contacted at: englishconsorts@gmail.com

Full details are available at the project website: https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/ren/about_us/centrestaff/norrie-consorts

CFP International conference on music iconography

Paper proposals are invited for the International Conference of Association RIdIM 2019 on “Belonging and Detachment: Representing Musical Identity in Visual Culture”.
The conference will take place in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, 13-15 November 2019.

Musicians and artists rarely operate in complete isolation. Throughout history they have negotiated power structures and geographical circumstances, and these factors remain influential in the digital age.

The 19th International Conference of Association RIdIM seeks to examine the ways in which musicians and artists experience ‘belonging’ and ‘detachment’ – be it socially, politically, geographically, artistically, aesthetically and/or philosophically. The primary concern of the conference is how such experiences impact upon the representation of musical identity in visual culture.

As the current global crisis of mass migration and displacement highlights many different experiences of belonging and detachment, Association RIdIM invites submissions on all aspects of this theme relating to the representation of musical identity in visual culture. It hopes to foster a dialogue between scholars and practitioners and calls for paper proposals from diverse participants including musicologists, art historians and theorists, curators, performers, composers and artists.

Topics related to the conference theme might include:

  • The Other and Otherness
  • Centre and Periphery
  • Migration, Displacement, Diaspora
  • Multiculturalism, Cultural Pluralism and Transculturalism
  • Colonialism and Post-Colonialism
  • Music, Class and Power
  • Networks and Patronage
  • Artistic Hierarchies
  • Curatorial Practice
  • Considerations on Music Iconography as a Discipline
  • Music, Art and Empathy

Proposals are welcomed from visual artists and musicians addressing the ways in which the conference theme is approached in their own work.

Deadline for abstract submission: 1 April 2019.
For further information, including details of conference awards, see the RIdIM website.

CFP Romantic Studies Association of Australiasia 2019 Conference

Proposals are invited for the the fifth biennial RSAA conference in Canberra, Australia, 21-23 November 2019. The conference theme is ‘Embodying Romanticism’.

Although the body has preoccupied literary scholarship for some time, there has been a renewed attention in Romantic studies to the complex ways in which literature encodes and reproduces our awareness of embodied experience. Challenging views of Romanticism as bounded by visionary and idealist expression, such work reflects a reorientation of criticism around the materiality of Romantic culture, whether configured as part of the age of sensibility or in relation to the era’s natural and social sciences. The Romantic period was, moreover, a time when control of the body emerged as a key political issue in workshops, homes, battlefields and colonies, when bodies were subject to rapidly evolving ideas of gender, class and race, while new bodies of knowledge and corporate political bodies emerged to regulate the affairs of nations and empires. This was a period when bodies were subject to ever more intensive modes of analysis and management, at the same time that bodies imposed their transgressive physicality through new understandings of environments, vitalism, trauma, slavery, disease and taste. Attentive to such developments, Romantic studies in turn dovetails with a broader materialist emphasis that explores how bodies are shaped in relation to affect, biopolitics, speculative realism, post-humanism and eco-criticism. Alain Badiou has recently proposed that our modern, liberal ideology can today only perceive two objects: bodies and language. Aligning itself at the conjuncture of these two terms, this conference invites papers that broadly consider how embodiment was evoked, challenged and understood in Romantic cultural life.

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers on any aspects of Romanticism and embodiment. Proposals may be for individual papers or for panels of 3-4 papers.

Abstracts of approximately 250 words are due by 30 June 2019. Please send abstracts to the conference convenor, Neil Ramsey, at n.ramsey@unsw.edu.au

Postgraduate bursaries are available. See the conference website for details: https://www.unsw.adfa.edu.au/conferences/rsaa/postgraduate-bursaries

CFP Southeastern Medieval Association 2019, UNC-Greensboro

The Southeastern Medieval Association is pleased to announce the Call for Papers for its 2019 Conference to be held 14-16 November at UNC-Greensboro, co-sponsored by UNCG, North Carolina Wesleyan College and Wake Forest University.

We invite proposals for individual papers, whole sessions, or round tables on the conference theme of “medieval gateways.” Papers might consider the notion of transforming places and identities within medieval history, literature, and culture; the role of liminality in literary and cultural productions; diaspora and migration in the medieval period; instances of ideological reform; transitions from the medieval to the modern; the rise of the vernacular, or iconoclasm.

The organisers are extremely proud that Greensboro was one of the earliest sites of the “sit-in” lunch counter protests that sparked the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s. Our downtown is home to the International Civil Rights Center and Museum, which is located in the Woolworth Building and houses the original lunch counter where non-violent protesters sat in early 1960. In honor of this important aspect of our area’s history, the conference organizers also propose a secondary thematic thread for the conference on “Resistance.” Papers on this sub-topic might consider the various means of transgressing the physical, religious, social, political, legal, and economic boundaries imposed during the Middle Ages and beyond.

Proposals for individual papers should be limited to 300 words. Session proposals or roundtables should include abstracts for the three papers for a session, or 5-6 abstracts for a roundtable, as well as the contact information for all presenters.

Abstracts on any aspect of medieval studies are welcome, but we will give preference to submissions related to the conference theme. Please submit proposals to semagso2019@gmail.com no later than 3 June, 2019

CFP George Rudé Seminar and the Society for French Historical Studies Conference, Auckland

On 7-10 July 2020 to a theme of ‘France and Beyond’, the first ever joint meeting of the George Rudé Seminar and the Society for French Historical Studies Conference will be held in Auckland on the two campuses of the University of Auckland and Massey University, Albany. This special conference marks a departure from the norms of both societies while preserving and promoting the atmosphere and the intimacy of intellectual exchange nurtured and valued by both. It brings closer together chercheurs and scholars of French History, and welcomes those members of the wider global fraternity of French Historians to ally themselves to their colleagues in Auckland. Leading scholars from the US, UK and Europe will be keynote guests, and many American and international colleagues have already signalled their intention to attend.

The organisers invite the submission of panels, roundtables, and individual papers (papers should be 15-to-20 minutes) on any aspect of French History, Medieval to Contemporary. Areas of traditional French historical research will be featured alongside popular themes: Citizenship in the Medieval and Early Modern European world; the Revolutionary period and its environmental impact in the wider Atlantic world; and changing approaches to French or Franco-British History in the NZ/Australasian and Pacific region – in Océanie.

Please submit proposals of 300 words per speaker and a biographical profile of 100 words. Panels will of course be welcome if the panellists are all committed to coming to NZ, but due to the distance involved, it is expected that submissions will be mainly made up of individual papers (which the organisers will assemble into panels by subject or theme). Comment will be by the audience, and we would welcome volunteers who would be willing and able to chair sessions. This is a preliminary call for papers preparing scholars for this meeting, and to give those who will need to travel, time to organise their projects and papers for Auckland next year. There will be a further official call for papers in May 2019 and the deadline for proposals is 1 October 2019.

Please allow us to remind you that participants from North America must be members in good standing of the Society for French Historical Studies. Other scholars are warmly invited to join the Society, as well, although there is no obligation to do so.

For any other questions, information on travel and accommodation (that will continue to appear across 2019), please consult the website, France and Beyond or contact one of:

Tracy Adams, Co-President t.adams@auckland.ac.nz
Kirsty Carpenter, Co-President K.Carpenter@massey.ac.nz
Joe Zizek, Treasurer j.zizek@auckland.ac.nz