Category Archives: conference

CFP Scientiae: Early Modern Knowledge

Scientiae is the interdisciplinary conference on intellectual culture, 1400-1800. It is centred on, but not limited to, developments in the early modern natural sciences. Philosophers, historians, literary scholars and others are invited to share their perspectives on this vital period. The eighth annual meeting will be held at Queen’s University, Belfast on 12 – 15 June 2019.

Plenary addresses by:

Ingrid Rowland (Notre Dame/Rome) and Rob Iliffe (Oxford)

and plenary panels led by:

Subha Mukherji (Cambridge) and Marco Sgarbi, Pietro Daniel Omodeo, and Craig Martin (Venice).

The steering committee seeks proposals for:

  • Individual (20-minute) papers: Please submit a descriptive title, 250-word abstract, and one-page CV.
  • Complete panels: Same as above for each paper, plus 150-word rationale for the panel. Maximum four panellists, plus chair (and/or respondent).
  • Workshops: One-page CV for each workshop leader, plus 250-word plan for the session: topic, techniques, hands-on resources, etc.
  • Seminars: One-page CV for each seminar leader, plus 250-word rationale for the session: its topic, and its suitability for treatment in seminar format.

Proposals should be sent to pertransibunt@gmail.com by 30 December, 2018. The committee will respond by the end of January. For more information, and the conference poster, see http://scientiae.co.uk.

CFP Gender, Memory and Documentary Culture, 900-1200

The John Rylands Research Institute Annual Conference 2019, ‘Gender, Memory and Documentary Culture 900-1200’, co-sponsored by the Haskins Society, will be held at the John Rylands Library, Manchester, UK 28-29 June, 2019.

This conference brings together aspects of gender and documentary culture between the tenth and the twelfth centuries that we believe inform and engage each other, but are often studied in isolation. Although the field of medieval gender studies is an active and well-populated one, less attention is given to the role gender played in the commissioning, use and preservation of documents, whether manuscript books or other types of documentary materials. Did medieval men and women interact with documentary culture in the same way? The texture of the relationship between gender and documentary cultures has yet to be teased out, and it is hoped that this conference will provide an ideal forum to advance this field.

Paper proposals on the following broad themes are invited:

  • Lay and ecclesiastical manuscript cultures
  • Rhetorical agency
  • Documentary genre and gender
  • Manuscript and cartulary production and dissemination
  • Gendered use of manuscripts (including commissioning, production and dissemination of women’s secular and monastic writing)
  • The gendering of memory
  • Documentary artifacts as material culture.

We are pleased to announce our plenary speakers:

  • Constance B. Bouchard (University of Akron)
  • Steven Vanderputten (Ghent University)

Paper submissions that utilize resources held at the John Rylands Library (http://www.library.manchester.ac.uk/search-resources/guide-to-special-collections/manuscripts-and-archives/ ) are especially welcome, as are submissions from Early Career Researchers.

To offer a paper, please send an abstract of 250 words to one of the organisers by 1 December 2018:
Laura Gathagan laura.gathagan@cortland.edu or
Charles Insley charles.insley@manchester.ac.uk

The cost of the conference will be £65, with reduced fees for postgraduate students and Haskins Society members.

CFP The Epoch of Space. State and New Perspectives

The International Congress ‘The epoch of space. State and new perspectives’ will be held in
Santiago de Compostela, Galiza, Spain 8-9 April 2019.

For centuries, the study of time was one of the main academic interests in the field of Humanities. However, in the second half of the 20thcentury, most scholars and philosophers shifted their focus to the question of space. This, termed “spatial turn” by Soja in 1989, encouraged the foundation of new approaches and perspectives whose main goal was to elucidate the “spatiality” (Tally, 2013) of beings as a result of their interaction with their physical surroundings.

Even though this new “era of space” was explicitly acknowledged and labelled as such (“l’époque de l’espace”) by Foucault in 1967, Gaston Bachelard’s La Poétique de l’espace, published in 1958, proved to be a turning point in the development of this perspective. In this work, Bachelard explores the experiences that result from human interactions with architecture through what the author termed “topoanalysis”: a method that uses psychology as a research tool for the study of the spaces and places that we inhabit.

The interest in studying this in the field of the arts has increased significantly in recent years, and is especially noticeable in the case of literary creations. Scholars today –particularly comparatists– are paying more attention to the rediscovered relevance and symbolic value of the geographic connections present in literary works. Likewise, the links between human beings and their physical surroundings stand out as a significant matter of study in the field. They have, indeed, been approached from a variety of perspectives, such as Ecologism and Marxism, mainly via the analysis of cultural creations and the impact of human communities in the territory.

The popularity of this kind of approaches has varied throughout history, and not all disciplines have been equally receptive to the notions underpinning them. While Ecocriticism and Geocriticism are well respected and established in literary studies, research fields like those of medieval studies, history, history of art, and classical studies seem to be rather detached from these perspectives.

The growing influence of Ecocriticism and Geocriticism is especially noticeable in digital humanities. The bridges recently built between these fields are already proving to be productive, as they have led to the development of new tools, approaches, and methodologies, such as deep mapping techniques and the spatial humanities. In the same way, the technical progress encouraged by the advancement of the internet and computer science has fostered the emergence of new habitats that suggest the need for a reinterpretation of the Bachelardian theories and the way we construct our identities in space.

Soja, Rueckert, Foucault and Bachelard’s iconic works will be 30, 40, 50, and 60 years old in 2018 and 2019. The time seems to be just right for reflecting on our task as researchers in the Era of Space – how have the disciplines evolved in recent years? Do we need to redefine the key concepts regarding space and place? Has our relationship with territory changed? Have we produced new ways of inhabiting space? It is our opinion that not only we need to rethink our answers to these questions, maybe even articulate new ones, but also we believe it necessarily needs to be done from the unavoidable perspective of the place from which we call on you: Galiza.

Among the guest speakers will be Robert T. Tally Jr. (Texas State University), Marilar Aleixandre (USC), Federico López Silvestre (USC) and the members of the project Eco-Fictions. Nevertheless, other scholars will be confirmed soon.

Call for papers

Proposals must include an abstract of 250-300 words and a brief biographical note, and should be linked to the research line that relates to your subject the most. Your proposal will then be reviewed by the scientific committee.

Presentations should not exceed 20 minutes. Every intervention will be followed by a Q&A session. Accepted languages include Galiza, Portuguese, Spanish, Catalan and English.

Deadline: 1 December 2018.

We are looking for presentations which, from different disciplines or perspectives, approach the question of space. Below you will find a number of suggested topics (these are non-exclusive, and you might suggest other related topics):

  • Reviews or contemporary readings of consolidated works or authors, like Gaston Bachelard or Edward Soja.
  • Reflections on the current state of research perspectives, such as Ecocriticism or Geocriticism.
  • Space and new technologies: how the digital humanities have influenced research methodologies (spatial humanities or digital environmental humanities), virtual reality, new habitats, etc.
  • The reception of the spatial turn beyond literary studies: theoretical perspectives or analyses related with history of art, anthropology, architecture or philosophy.
  • ‘Diachronic’ readings: space in other time periods or cultures, such as Antiquity or Middle Ages.
  • Non-anthropocentric conceptions: bodyless spaces, animality or sacred geographies.
  • The relations between human beings and the territory.

CFP Pacific Coast Conference on British Studies

The Pacific Coast Conference on British Studies (PCCBS) will meet at UC Merced, California, from 22 to 24 March, 2019. 

The PCCBS invites papers representing all fields of British Studies — broadly defined to include those who study the United Kingdom, its component parts and nationalities, as well as Britain’s imperial cultures. We welcome proposals from scholars (including doctoral candidates working on their thesis) in a wide range of disciplines across the humanities, social sciences, and the arts, including History, Literature, Political Science, Philosophy, Religion, Gender Studies, Cultural Studies, Theater Studies, and Art History.

Proposals for individual papers, partial panels, or complete panels are all welcome, although complete panel proposals are preferred. We encourage the submission of proposals dealing with interdisciplinary topics, as well as pedagogies and technologies.

The deadline for submission of proposals is 1 December 2018

Proposals should include a 200-word abstract for each paper plus a biography for each participant. Those submitting full or partial panel proposals should include a brief description of the panel plus a brief biography for the panel chair as well as for its commentator (if any). Proposals will be submitted by google forms. As we will use the data entered for the program, please be careful with spelling of names, institutions and paper titles.

More information can be found here.

Individual paper proposals should be submitted here.

Panel proposals should be submitted here.

CFP Remembering the Middle Ages? Reception, Identity, Politics

The organisers invite submissions of abstracts for 20-minute papers to be presented at the two-day conference, Remembering the Middle Ages? Reception, Identity, Politics, to be held at Fischer Hall, the University of Notre Dame’s London campus, on 5 and 6 April, 2019.

 

The conference aims to unite an international and interdisciplinary group of scholars in conversation about the uses of the “medieval” period across time. Particularly, we ask how the concept of a “cultural memory” of the Middle Ages can be useful (or not) in understanding how and why scholars, artists, audiences, and other users have resourced or imagined the Middle Ages, in any post-medieval period. We ask participants to interrogate the linguistic, material, and social networks that have been created by medieval things over time.

Papers considering the intersections of medievalisms, cultural memory, and concepts of identity are particularly welcome. Potential topic areas might include, but are not limited to: discourses of race or ethno-nationalism; medievalisms that remember a multiple and complex Middle Ages; antiquarian scholarship; visual and performance art; translation theory; heritage discourses; global remembrances of the European Middle Ages; assemblages of the European and non-European in medievalist projects; cultural memory of the Middle Ages; the politics of medievalism; periodization; intersections between nativist dialogues and medievalism; right-wing and/ or left-wing medievalisms; medievalisms that disrupt stereotypes.

We encourage researchers at all career stages to apply. Please submit 300-word abstracts and a short bio to mensley@nd.edu and francesca.allfrey@kcl.ac.uk by 7 January, 2019.

Symposium: The Family as Mnemonic Community, Wellington NZ, 29-30 November

The Family as Mnemonic Community symposium is being held at Victoria University of Wellington on 29 and 30 November 2018, preceded by a public lecture on the evening of Wednesday 28 November.

The symposium includes an international and interdisciplinary group of researchers who will share their research on family memory and discuss the following broad questions:

• what kinds of stories or information do families pass down the generations?
• how are family stories about the past transmitted, remembered, and received?
• why do family memories and stories about the past matter in the present?
• what are the advantages and disadvantages of different scholarly approaches?

For more information, see the Symposium’s website: https://www.victoria.ac.nz/stout-centre/about/events/the-family-as-mnemonic-community

CFP 2019 Conference: The Body and Politics

Cambridge Graduate Studies in Political Thought and Intellectual History invite proposals for the 2019 Conference: The Body and Politics, to be held at the University of Cambridge, 18-19 March, 2019.

Keynote speaker: Dr Anna Becker (University of Copenhagen)

The relationship between the body and politics has long been a central concern of political thought. The ‘body politic’ and ‘person of the state’ are core metaphors of European political theory. Understandings of the body have been used to delimit the sphere of political action, distinguishing human politics from sacred and animal relations, and excluding bodies through constructions of race, gender, and class; but the body has also been used to disrupt that sphere, from bodily obstruction as a form of defiance, to the invocation of bodily security as a justification for resistance.

In the latter half of the twentieth century, through explorations of ‘the King’s two bodies’ and legal and artificial persons, historians of political thought, from Ernst Kantorowicz to Quentin Skinner, sought to unpack the complex interactions between metaphors of the body, authority, and sovereignty from the medieval period to the modern. Meanwhile, Michel Foucault influentially redrew the relationship between the body, power and politics, interpreting the history of modern states through the emergence of ‘biopolitics’. Theorists and historians alike increasingly reflected on the connections between the exercise of state and imperial power, and gendered and racial constructions of the body.

Yet, for all its importance, the body has rarely been accorded the central consideration in historical thinking about politics it so clearly demands; it remains possible to insist, as Diana Coole has,the body has been widely neglected in political thought’. The work of our keynote speaker, Dr Anna Becker, on the gendered body in early modern political thought, suggests a powerful research agenda for future intellectual history to consider the multifaceted ways in which the body can be read into, and through, the political.

This conference encourages graduate researchers to take up this agenda, centering the body – human, animal, sacred, and political – in histories of political thought and scholarship. In thinking through the complex relation between the body and politics, participants are welcome to draw on insights from political thought and intellectual history, gender and post-colonial history, cultural history, and the history of science.

Submissions are invited on topics including, but not limited to:

  • Bodily metaphors in the history of political thought
  • Legal bodies: corpus and persona
  • Science, the body, and the politics of race and gender
  • Humans, animals, and the limits of the political
  • The body as a source of religious and scholarly controversy: ‘the body of Christ’ in the Eucharist; the corporeal resurrection; the nature of the Incarnation
  • Saintly relics, state funerals and the body in political memory
  • Biopolitics and the government of populations and territories
  • The body and laws of war: human shields, body counts and torture
  • The politics of medicine and the working of the body
  • Bodies on the move: refugees, migrants and statelessness
  • Free bodies and enslaved bodies
  • Planetary bodies and ideas of the universe

Interested doctoral students should send a short abstract (max. 500 words) and a brief CV (max. 2 pages) to the conveners, Hester van Hensbergen (hcv23@cam.ac.uk) and Eloise Davies (emmd2@cam.ac.uk).

The deadline for proposals is 31 October 2018.  

CFP 20th Australasian Association for Byzantine Studies Conference: Dissidence and Persecution in Byzantium

Paper and panel proposals are invited for the 20th Australasian Association for Byzantine Studies Conference: Dissidence and Persecution in Byzantium to be held at Macquarie University, Sydney, 19-21 July, 2019.

Keynote speakers:

Professor David Olster (University of Kentucky), speaking on ‘The Idolatry of the Jews and the Anti-Judaizing Roots of Seventh- and Early Eighth-Century Iconoclasm’

Associate Professor Jitse Dijkstra (University of Ottawa)

The Byzantine empire was rarely a stable and harmonious state during its long and eventful history. It was often in strife with those outside its borders and with those within them, and with so much power invested in its political and ecclesiastical structures it was ready to implode at times. This could result in persecution and the silencing of dissident voices from various quarters of society. The mechanisms by which the authorities controlled civil disorder and dissent, as well as discouraging criticism of imperial policies, could be brutal at times. In what sense was it possible, if at all, to enjoy freedom of speech and action in Byzantium? Was the law upheld or ignored when vested interests were at stake? How vulnerable did minorities feel and how conformist was religious belief at the end of the day? The theme of the conference aims to encourage discussion on a number fronts relating to the use and abuse of power within the history of Byzantium.

Individual papers of 20 mins or panels (3 papers) will be accepted on the following or related themes:

  • The rhetoric of persecution in hagiography and historiography
  • Monastic dissidence and dissidents
  • The persecution of minorities
  • Dissension in the military
  • Imperial usurpation and sedition
  • Discourses of violence and tyranny in literature
  • Popular uprisings and civil disobedience
  • Satire and literary subversion
  • Laws relating to prosecution and capital punishment
  • Depictions of persecution in Byzantine art
  • Slavery and manumission
  • The forced baptism of Jews and others
  • Heresy and the imposition of religious orthodoxy
  • The suppression and oppression of women
  • Persecution of philosophers and other intellectuals
  • Anti-pagan policies
  • Forced migrations and resettlements – Manichaeans and Paulicians
  • The liturgical celebration of martyrdom

Abstracts of 500 words should be emailed to the President of AABS, Dr Ken Parry: conference@aabs.org.au by the due date of 7 January 2019.

Panel convenors should outline briefly their theme (100 words), and (a) add all three abstracts to their application, or (b) list the three speakers on their panel with their own abstract, plus (c) nominate a chairperson. Panelists should indicate clearly the title of their proposed panel if submitting their abstracts individually.

Acceptances will be advised by 25 January 2019.

For further information, please see the conference website http://www.aabs.org.au/conferences/20th/

CFP International Association for the Study of Environment, Space and Place

Proposals are invited for the 15th annual IASESP (International Association for the Study of Environment, Space and Place) conference, to be held at Liverpool John Moores University, 24 – 26 April, 2019. The conference theme is ‘Spaces and Places on the Edge: Margins, Borders, and Thresholds’

Place or space identified as on the edge is often the result of a judgment from the center. But it is also along the edges that one can shape or define the center. Edge and center are clearly relational and dynamic. What is a liminal space from one perspective can be the center from another vantage point. A border or frontier can be a boundary defining a space, a frame, or a threshold to a different environment, a gateway. It can be a physical or virtual space as well as a psychological or emotional state. Where is the edge? Borders circumscribe or limit space but they also are zones of contact. How does one distinguish between a border and a threshold? How do people experience edges, borders, and thresholds (alarm, excitement, indifference)?

This interdisciplinary conference will explore questions related to spaces and places on the edge spatially, socially, politically, and metaphorically.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Barriers/perimeters
  • Borderland(s)
  • Boundaries
  • Buffers/buffer zones
  • Coastlines
  • Dialectic of center and periphery, metropole and frontier
  • Ecotones/ecoclines
  • Extinction thresholds
  • Fringe areas/movements
  • Frontiers
  • Horizons
  • Interstices
  • Liminality
  • Marshes
  • Mapping the edges
  • Marginalia
  • Marginalized people or places
  • Midrash or Tafsir
  • Natural or manmade borders
  • Phenomenology of edges
  • Suburbs
  • Thresholds

Please send an abstract and brief CV by 15 February 2019 to Troy Paddock, paddockt1@southernct.edu

CFP 40th Annual Medieval and Renaissance Forum

Proposals are invited for the 40th Medieval and Renaissance Forum: Listening and Learning in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, which will take place on 12 and 13 April, 2019 at Keene State College in Keene, New Hampshire. 

We welcome abstracts (one page or less) or panel proposals that discuss music and other aural experiences in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Papers and sessions, however, need not be confined to this theme but may cover other aspects of medieval and Renaissance life, literature, languages, art, philosophy, theology, history, and music.

This year’s keynote speaker is Margot Fassler, Keough-Hesburgh Professor of Music History and Liturgy at the University of Notre Dame. Dr. Fassler is a music historian who gives the liturgy and its performance primary emphasis in her scholarly publications and her teaching. Her scholarship profoundly elucidates the connections between texts and music. Her 2014 book, Music in the Medieval West and its accompanying anthology (Norton) are now standard introductions to medieval music. Fassler’s many books, edited volumes, and articles focus on the Latin Middle Ages from around 800-1300, but she also has strong interests in contemporary sacred music and ritual, and in American song, singers, and song collections. She is currently writing a book on Hildegard of Bingen. Fassler is also a documentary filmmaker focusing on communities of song. She recently finished (with Christian Jara) the short documentary Where the Hudson Meets the Nile: Coptic Chant in Jersey City.

Students, faculty, and independent scholars are welcome. Please indicate your status (undergraduate, graduate, or faculty), affiliation (if relevant), and full contact information, including email address on your proposal.

We welcome undergraduate sessions, but ask that students obtain a faculty member’s approval and sponsorship.  

Please submit abstracts, audio/visual needs, and full contact information to Dr. Robert G. Sullivan, Assistant Forum Director at sullivan@german.umass.edu.

Abstract deadline: 15 January, 2019

Presenters and early registration from 15 March, 2019.