Category Archives: conference

CFP Perth Medieval and Renaissance Group Conference

This year’s conference of the Perth Medieval and Renaissance Group and the UWA Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies will take place on 19 October, 2019. The conference theme is Mental Health in the Medieval and Early Modern World.

Modern stereotypes abound regarding how mental health was perceived during the medieval and early modern period ranging from mental illness being caused by sin to the idea that the attainment of mental well-being could only be achieved through the balancing of the bodily humours. But mental health was a more complex and expansive subject of discourse throughout the period that was widely explored in medical treatises, religious tracts and sermons, and prominent in art and literature, which speaks to a more subtle understanding of the human mental state.

This conference aims to look at both the changing and continuing perceptions of mental health throughout the medieval and early modern period. We welcome papers from the fields of book culture and manuscript studies, history, material culture, medicine, art, and literature, but not limited to, the following broad headings:

  • Suicide
  • Marginal lives
  • Melancholy / Depression
  • Insanity / Mental disorder
  • Rapture / Ecstasy
  • Bodily humours
  • Addiction
  • Anguish
  • Therapies
  • Meditation / Mindfulness / Well-being
  • Imagination
  • Dreams / Visions / Memory
  • Criminality
  • Self-harm
  • Solitude
  • Natural / Kind / Unnatural

The conference organisers invite proposals for 20-minute papers. Please send a paper title, 250-word abstract, and a short (no more than 100-word) biography to: pmrg.cmems.conference@gmail.com by 31 May 2019.

For further information, see the conference flyer posted below and visit the conference website.

Download (PDF, 5.42MB)

CFP Mid-America Medieval Association Conference

Abstracts are invited for the 43rd Mid-America Medieval Association (MAMA) conference, “What Lies Beneath: Uncovering Structures, Subtexts, Skeletons”. The conference will take place on 14 September 2019 at the University of Missouri—Kansas City.

Plenary Speaker, Professor Kathryn Ann Smith, New York University

Papers on any aspect of medieval culture, medieval studies, and medievalism will be considered, but presentations that consider and/or (re)evaluate what lies beneath the surface of the discipline will be particularly welcome. Potential topics could include but are not limited to:

  • discussing excavating bodies in medieval graveyards
  • the structures of medieval books
  • the subtexts of medieval legal treatises
  • the underlying assumptions about race, sex, and gender found in both medieval sources and the scholarly work of medievalists
  • the underlying influences on medieval poetry
  • the foundations of the medieval motet
  • the materials used in producing goods
  • what “lies beneath” the profession of medieval studies

Proposals for either papers (abstracts limited to 250 words) or sessions (abstracts limited to 250 words along with a list of titles and presenters) should be sent via email attachment (MS Word preferred) to Linda Mitchell: mitchellli@umkc.edu

Deadline for proposals is 25 June 2019.

Symposium: The Surrounding Forest – Trees in the Medieval Imaginary

Registration is now open for the symposium The Surrounding Forest: Trees in the Medieval Imaginary. This will take place at Birkbeck College, University of London on 22 June, 2019 and is hosted by Medieval Ecocriticisms and N/EMICS.

This one-day symposium aims to explore the image of the tree as a conduit for the exploration of human engagements with environment in the global middle ages, broadly defined, and seeks to encourage cross-cultural, trans-national, and interdisciplinary understanding of the role of trees, woodland, and other vegetation in various contexts. We want to better understand human responses to nature. What is it about ‘arboreal beauty’ that connects it with the divine? Recognized across cultures as axis mundi, the tree shoots upwards, its trunk and branches stretching, reaching, growing towards the light as it seeks to bridge the in-between space that divides earth from the heavens. The liminal quality of foliage, trees, and forests is recognized by artists and weavers of images across the world.

A full programme can be downloaded below.
Please register at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/the-surrounding-forest-trees-in-the-medieval-imaginary-tickets-59037494736

For further information, see:
https://northernemics.wordpress.com/the-surrounding-forest-trees-in-the-medieval-imaginary/

http://www.bbk.ac.uk/events/remote_event_view?id=5308

Download (PDF, 2.4MB)

Australian Academy of the Humanities and The British Academy Knowledge Frontiers Forum

The British Academy and the Australian Academy of the Humanities are inviting applications for humanities, arts and social science Early Career Researchers (ECRs) to attend the Knowledge Frontiers Forum on the broad theme ‘The Future’ to take place Monday 11-Tuesday 12 November 2019 in Brisbane.

The Forum will bring together up to 40 ECRs (understood as up to seven years after obtaining a PhD) from the UK, Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific region to discuss key questions around the futures theme. This has been broadly envisaged, and areas of expected discussion include experiences of rapid social and cultural change, evolving notions of heritage, imaginations of the future, environmental futures, and co-designing and producing knowledge in the future. Recognising the contribution of Indigenous knowledge to discussions of the future, applications from Indigenous researchers working across these thematic areas are encouraged.

Travel and accommodation expenses will be met for successful applicants.

See the Australian Academy of the Humanities website for full details of the event and application process. Applications are due no later than 5:00pm GMT Wednesday 10 April 2019.

New Zealand and Pacific applicants:

The British Academy and Australian Academy of the Humanities have made places available for up to four New Zealanders and two Pacific Islands delegates, with Royal Society Te Apārangi providing travel grants of up to NZ$750 (up to $750 for ECR Forum Members and Pacific delegates, two-thirds of cost up to $500 for non-member New Zealand delegates). For further information, see the Royal Society of New Zealand website.

CFP International conference on music iconography

Paper proposals are invited for the International Conference of Association RIdIM 2019 on “Belonging and Detachment: Representing Musical Identity in Visual Culture”.
The conference will take place in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, 13-15 November 2019.

Musicians and artists rarely operate in complete isolation. Throughout history they have negotiated power structures and geographical circumstances, and these factors remain influential in the digital age.

The 19th International Conference of Association RIdIM seeks to examine the ways in which musicians and artists experience ‘belonging’ and ‘detachment’ – be it socially, politically, geographically, artistically, aesthetically and/or philosophically. The primary concern of the conference is how such experiences impact upon the representation of musical identity in visual culture.

As the current global crisis of mass migration and displacement highlights many different experiences of belonging and detachment, Association RIdIM invites submissions on all aspects of this theme relating to the representation of musical identity in visual culture. It hopes to foster a dialogue between scholars and practitioners and calls for paper proposals from diverse participants including musicologists, art historians and theorists, curators, performers, composers and artists.

Topics related to the conference theme might include:

  • The Other and Otherness
  • Centre and Periphery
  • Migration, Displacement, Diaspora
  • Multiculturalism, Cultural Pluralism and Transculturalism
  • Colonialism and Post-Colonialism
  • Music, Class and Power
  • Networks and Patronage
  • Artistic Hierarchies
  • Curatorial Practice
  • Considerations on Music Iconography as a Discipline
  • Music, Art and Empathy

Proposals are welcomed from visual artists and musicians addressing the ways in which the conference theme is approached in their own work.

Deadline for abstract submission: 1 April 2019.
For further information, including details of conference awards, see the RIdIM website.

Registration open: Australasian Association for Byzantine Studies Conference

Registration is now open for the 20th Australasian Association for Byzantine Studies Conference, Dissidence and Persecution in Byzantium.

Macquarie University, Sydney, July 19-21 2019
To register, go to: http://events.mq.edu.au/AABS20

Keynote speakers:

Professor David Olster (University of Kentucky)
“The Idolatry of the Jews and the Anti-Judaizing Roots of Seventh- and Early Eighth-Century Iconoclasm”

Associate Professor Jitse Dijkstra (University of Ottawa)
“The Avenging Sword? Imperial Legislation Against Temples in the Fourth and Fifth Centuries”

The Byzantine empire was rarely a stable and harmonious state during its long and eventful history. It was often in strife with those outside its borders and with those within them, and with so much power invested in its political and ecclesiastical structures it was ready to implode at times. This could result in persecution and the silencing of dissident voices from various quarters of society. The mechanisms by which the authorities controlled civil disorder and dissent, as well as discouraging criticism of imperial policies, could be brutal at times. In what sense was it possible, if at all, to enjoy freedom of speech and action in Byzantium? Was the law upheld or ignored when vested interests were at stake? How vulnerable did minorities feel and how conformist was religious belief at the end of the day? The theme of the conference aims to encourage discussion on a number fronts relating to the use and abuse of power within the history of Byzantium.

CFP Romantic Studies Association of Australiasia 2019 Conference

Proposals are invited for the the fifth biennial RSAA conference in Canberra, Australia, 21-23 November 2019. The conference theme is ‘Embodying Romanticism’.

Although the body has preoccupied literary scholarship for some time, there has been a renewed attention in Romantic studies to the complex ways in which literature encodes and reproduces our awareness of embodied experience. Challenging views of Romanticism as bounded by visionary and idealist expression, such work reflects a reorientation of criticism around the materiality of Romantic culture, whether configured as part of the age of sensibility or in relation to the era’s natural and social sciences. The Romantic period was, moreover, a time when control of the body emerged as a key political issue in workshops, homes, battlefields and colonies, when bodies were subject to rapidly evolving ideas of gender, class and race, while new bodies of knowledge and corporate political bodies emerged to regulate the affairs of nations and empires. This was a period when bodies were subject to ever more intensive modes of analysis and management, at the same time that bodies imposed their transgressive physicality through new understandings of environments, vitalism, trauma, slavery, disease and taste. Attentive to such developments, Romantic studies in turn dovetails with a broader materialist emphasis that explores how bodies are shaped in relation to affect, biopolitics, speculative realism, post-humanism and eco-criticism. Alain Badiou has recently proposed that our modern, liberal ideology can today only perceive two objects: bodies and language. Aligning itself at the conjuncture of these two terms, this conference invites papers that broadly consider how embodiment was evoked, challenged and understood in Romantic cultural life.

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers on any aspects of Romanticism and embodiment. Proposals may be for individual papers or for panels of 3-4 papers.

Abstracts of approximately 250 words are due by 30 June 2019. Please send abstracts to the conference convenor, Neil Ramsey, at n.ramsey@unsw.edu.au

Postgraduate bursaries are available. See the conference website for details: https://www.unsw.adfa.edu.au/conferences/rsaa/postgraduate-bursaries

CFP Southeastern Medieval Association 2019, UNC-Greensboro

The Southeastern Medieval Association is pleased to announce the Call for Papers for its 2019 Conference to be held 14-16 November at UNC-Greensboro, co-sponsored by UNCG, North Carolina Wesleyan College and Wake Forest University.

We invite proposals for individual papers, whole sessions, or round tables on the conference theme of “medieval gateways.” Papers might consider the notion of transforming places and identities within medieval history, literature, and culture; the role of liminality in literary and cultural productions; diaspora and migration in the medieval period; instances of ideological reform; transitions from the medieval to the modern; the rise of the vernacular, or iconoclasm.

The organisers are extremely proud that Greensboro was one of the earliest sites of the “sit-in” lunch counter protests that sparked the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s. Our downtown is home to the International Civil Rights Center and Museum, which is located in the Woolworth Building and houses the original lunch counter where non-violent protesters sat in early 1960. In honor of this important aspect of our area’s history, the conference organizers also propose a secondary thematic thread for the conference on “Resistance.” Papers on this sub-topic might consider the various means of transgressing the physical, religious, social, political, legal, and economic boundaries imposed during the Middle Ages and beyond.

Proposals for individual papers should be limited to 300 words. Session proposals or roundtables should include abstracts for the three papers for a session, or 5-6 abstracts for a roundtable, as well as the contact information for all presenters.

Abstracts on any aspect of medieval studies are welcome, but we will give preference to submissions related to the conference theme. Please submit proposals to semagso2019@gmail.com no later than 3 June, 2019

CFP George Rudé Seminar and the Society for French Historical Studies Conference, Auckland

On 7-10 July 2020 to a theme of ‘France and Beyond’, the first ever joint meeting of the George Rudé Seminar and the Society for French Historical Studies Conference will be held in Auckland on the two campuses of the University of Auckland and Massey University, Albany. This special conference marks a departure from the norms of both societies while preserving and promoting the atmosphere and the intimacy of intellectual exchange nurtured and valued by both. It brings closer together chercheurs and scholars of French History, and welcomes those members of the wider global fraternity of French Historians to ally themselves to their colleagues in Auckland. Leading scholars from the US, UK and Europe will be keynote guests, and many American and international colleagues have already signalled their intention to attend.

The organisers invite the submission of panels, roundtables, and individual papers (papers should be 15-to-20 minutes) on any aspect of French History, Medieval to Contemporary. Areas of traditional French historical research will be featured alongside popular themes: Citizenship in the Medieval and Early Modern European world; the Revolutionary period and its environmental impact in the wider Atlantic world; and changing approaches to French or Franco-British History in the NZ/Australasian and Pacific region – in Océanie.

Please submit proposals of 300 words per speaker and a biographical profile of 100 words. Panels will of course be welcome if the panellists are all committed to coming to NZ, but due to the distance involved, it is expected that submissions will be mainly made up of individual papers (which the organisers will assemble into panels by subject or theme). Comment will be by the audience, and we would welcome volunteers who would be willing and able to chair sessions. This is a preliminary call for papers preparing scholars for this meeting, and to give those who will need to travel, time to organise their projects and papers for Auckland next year. There will be a further official call for papers in May 2019 and the deadline for proposals is 1 October 2019.

Please allow us to remind you that participants from North America must be members in good standing of the Society for French Historical Studies. Other scholars are warmly invited to join the Society, as well, although there is no obligation to do so.

For any other questions, information on travel and accommodation (that will continue to appear across 2019), please consult the website, France and Beyond or contact one of:

Tracy Adams, Co-President t.adams@auckland.ac.nz
Kirsty Carpenter, Co-President K.Carpenter@massey.ac.nz
Joe Zizek, Treasurer j.zizek@auckland.ac.nz

CFP The Surrounding Forest: Trees in the Medieval Imaginary

Proposals are invited for a symposium hosted by Medieval Ecocriticisms and N/EMICS, 22 June 2019, Birkbeck College, University of London.

In the Shanameh written by the Persian poet Ferdowsi at around the turn of the Christian millennium, the conqueror Sekandar (aka Alexander the Great) encounters a speaking tree that foretells his doom, saying:

Few days remain;
You must prepare your final baggage train.
Neither your mother, nor your family,
Nor the veiled women of your land will see
Your face again.

Like the tree of the Dream of the Rood, which speaks for itself, or the dream tree of Nebuchadnezzar in the Book of Daniel, which portends the Babylonian king’s own fall, the speaking tree faced by Sekandar is a being that possesses knowledge and understanding of the world that far exceeds his own. There is something magnificent about trees, a majesty to their towering figures that singles them out as more than just a part of our natural surroundings. Rooted in the soil, they emerge from below and aim high: forever branching never-ending fractals. Exhaling, we relax and sink into their repeating patterns. Why do we recognize them as objects of beauty? How is this loveliness captured in medieval imagery? Is the method different across cultures? Why? Are arboreal images particularly well-suited to certain types of knowledge communication? What might they be? We are interested in how humans use these images drawn from nature to communicate effectively.

This one-day symposium aims to explore the image of the tree as a conduit for the exploration of human engagements with environment in the global middle ages, broadly defined, and seeks to encourage cross-cultural, trans-national, and interdisciplinary understanding of the role of trees, woodland, and other vegetation in various contexts. We want to better understand human responses to nature. What is it about ‘arboreal beauty’ that connects it with the divine? Recognized across cultures as axis mundi, the tree shoots upwards, its trunk and branches stretching, reaching, growing towards the light as it seeks to bridge the in-between space that divides earth from the heavens. The liminal quality of foliage, trees, and forests is recognized by artists and weavers of images across the world.

Papers may include, but are not limited to, consideration of trees:

– as central and marginal images

– as symbol and metaphor for systems of kinship/networks/communities

– as a material for craft/manufacture that acknowledges/utilizes arboreal materiality

– and geographical/regional variation in their symbolic, religious, and cultural significance

– and forests as persons, and the emotional/sensory life of trees

– pre-/post-Industrial age

– as means of expressing human emotion

– as a means of considering Deep Time, timelessness, eternity, and temporality

– and their connection with ‘folk’ customs and practices

– as a symbol for negotiation across cultures, religions, and cultural traditions

– as an image of salvation, with life-giving properties, for the body and/or soul

– as underlying diagrammatic structures in mapping and communicating knowledge

Anyone interested in participating should send a paper title and brief abstract (max 250 words) for 20-minute papers to the organizers, Mike Bintley (michael.bintley@bbk.ac.uk) and Pippa Salonius (pippa.salonius@monash.edu), by 1 March, 2019.

Please include your full contact details, including institutional affiliation and professional status.