Category Archives: publication

CFP Histories of the Senses

The editors of the Journal of the Canadian Historical Association invite submissions for papers on “Histories of the Senses” to be delivered as a panel at the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Historical Association, 3-5 June 2019, at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada.

We welcome papers that focus on any time period and geographical location, from both early career researchers and established scholars. Papers will be 20 minutes in length and may be delivered in either English or French. As invited members of this panel, presenters will be encouraged to submit their papers for publication in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the Canadian Historical Association.

Please submit an abstract of no more than 300 words along with a CV of 1-2 pages to Mairi Cowan, at mairi.cowan@utoronto.ca, by 7 December.

 

Call for contributors for English Consorts: Power, Influence, Dynasty (Palgrave)

English Consorts: Power, Influence, Dynasty is a four-volume series—intended for Palgrave Macmillan’s “Queenship and Power” series—that aims to provide short, focused, well-researched, and refereed biographies of all of the English consorts since the Conquest.

Editors: Aidan Norrie, Carolyn Harris, Joanna Laynesmith, Danna Messer, and Elena Woodacre

Call for Contributors:

The Penguin Monarchs series is the latest in a long line of publications that have focused on the monarchs of England. The Penguin series, in particular, has generally been successful in combining scholarly research with readability and accessibility, often because the authors have chosen a particular lens to view the monarch through, giving the biographies more focus.

The Penguin Monarchs series, however, shines a light on what is generally still missing from studies of the English monarchy: the role of the consort. While the last decade has seen a plethora of both scholarly and popular biographies published on England’s consorts, there is no single, scholarly compendium where all the consorts since the Norman Conquest can be consulted: it is this curious lacuna that English Consorts: Power, Influence, Dynasty seeks to fill, creating a vital reference work for scholars, students, and the interested public.

English Consorts: Power, Influence, Dynasty is a four-volume series—intended for Palgrave Macmillan’s “Queenship and Power” series—that aims to provide short, focused, well-researched, and refereed biographies of all of the English consorts since the Conquest. Edited by a team of queenship experts and historians of monarchy, each of the volumes (Volume 1: Early Medieval Consorts; Volume 2: Later Medieval Consorts; Volume 3: Tudor and Stuart Consorts; Volume 4: Hanoverian to Windsor Consorts) will include biographical essays, as well as commissioned essays from leading experts on various thematic topics. We are interested in both male and female consorts, but can only include essays related to the spouses of a reigning monarch: as such, Anne Hyde and Sophia Dorothea of Celle will not be included, but we plan to include an essay on Margaret of France, wife of Henry the Young King.

Like the Penguin Monarchs books, however, each of the essays must have a lens through which the consort is viewed. Rather than simply replicating the consort’s entry in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, readers should come away from each essay with a sense of what was unique to, or ‘special’ about, a particular consort. For instance, the essay on Elizabeth of York could be sub-titled ‘The Unifier’, and focus on her role in the ending of the Wars of the Roses, or instead ‘Daughter, Sister, Niece, Wife, and Mother of Kings’, and focus on her political, social, and religious influence during her life. Likewise, the essay on Philip II could be sub-titled ‘The First Male Consort’, or instead, ‘King and Consort’.

Potential authors may submit abstracts for more than one consort. We ask, however, that the abstracts all be sent as attachments to the same email, with the chapters ranked in preference. Proposed chapter titles should take the format of the consort’s name, followed by a colon, followed by the brief sub-title that signifies to the reader the chapter’s focus. We also plan to include some thematic essays that take a particular angle, and consider the consorts from an entire dynasty together. Interested authors may wish to also submit an abstract for one of these essays.

Please send chapter abstracts of no more than 250 words, accompanied by a brief biography, for essays between 6000 and 7500 words (including references) to englishconsorts@gmail.com by 1 May 2019. Accepted authors will be notified by mid-July 2019, and completed essays will be due to the volume’s editor by 1 June 2020.

We are keen to hear from scholars regardless of their career stage or situation, and encourage submissions from specialists from a range of disciplines (including, but not limited to, history, literary studies, art history, archaeology, race studies, and the performing arts).

Thematic Essay Topics:

In relation to the thematic essay topics, we have some fairly solid ideas for the content we want covered. To help out potential contributors, the following essay topics are currently in need of an author:

  • Consorts as Regents, Patrons, and Parents
  • The Hanoverian Consorts
  • The Windsor Consorts

While the content and coverage of the essay is fairly fixed, we are interested in a wide range of angles and approaches. Please don’t hesitate to get in touch if you have any questions, or have an idea you’d like to run past us. We are also happy to receive abstracts for co-authored pieces.

Queens of England Series:

Authors might also be interested in submitting proposals to the upcoming monograph series on the Queens of England, published by Routledge, and edited by Ellie Woodacre and Louise Wilkinson. For more information, see here, or contact Ellie at: Ellie.Woodacre@winchester.ac.uk.

CFP French Journal of Medieval English Studies

The French Journal of Medieval English Studies Etudes Médiévales Anglaises is seeking submissions for its 94th issue, focusing on the notion of “space”. The papers, written in French or English, should be submitted by 30 May, 2019 (see more information below). Authors who wish to submit a paper are advised to get in touch and submit a title with a brief description of content as soon as convenient.

Though space is by no means a medieval concept (in fourteenth-century use, the word referred primarily to time, or to an interval between two objects, rather than to the abstract idea of an extended area that can be filled or crossed), the concept in its complexity has over the last decades gained considerable critical importance in medieval studies. Medievalists have always paid attention to spatial questions, namely in the shape of inquiries into the location of national or religious communities, into medieval practices of pilgrimages, processions and travels, or into the symbolic associations of various places (the forest, the garden, the castle…). However, “critical reflection on spatial concepts and categories” has developed more recently with the rise of cultural geography in the 1970s (Weiss & Salih, 2012, xv), and subsequent postmodern explorations of the ideological assumptions which defined and produced medieval urban and rural spaces, places of power and sites of piety and fashioned social and gendered spaces within these wider areas.

In this context, scholars set out to explore the “heterogeneity and flux of medieval spatial paradigms” (Cohen & Madeline, 2014, 7). Interdisciplinary approaches flourished, as scholars were drawing together geographical, literary and cultural studies. A renewed awareness of the importance of networks which extend beyond “national” identities led to a re-appraisal of the formation of Europe (Wallace, 2016), while readings drawing on post-colonial theory also re-examined medieval discourses on the other, whether inside or outside Europe (Conklin-Akbari, 2009). Interest in spatial studies also fostered analyses of “topographies of power” (de Jong & Theuws, 2001) and of the organization of sacred and secular spaces, in particular in relation to medieval assumptions about social and gender divisions (Gilchrist, 1994). In more recent years, ecocriticism has helped diversify the perspective on space by opening critical discourse to preoccupations with nature (Cohen, 2015).

A pervasive, multifaceted concept in medieval studies, space offers insight into countless aspects of medieval society, from political institutions and the staging of power to rising attempts at defining individuality, from archaeological studies of social spaces to literary approaches of imaginary cartographies.

Etudes Médiévales Anglaises invites papers from all disciplinary backgrounds on medieval conceptions and practices of space in the British Isles, including:

  • Conceptualising space
    • Medieval astronomical conceptions of the world.
    • The British contribution to the rise of geography and cartography.
    • What is a kingdom? Attempts at defining kingdoms, namely in the context of shifting territorial extension.
    • Forming a sense of community (Christendom, national identity) in the Middle Ages.
  • Fashioning space
    • Bordering territory in the British Isles in the Middle Ages: techniques, theories and practices.
    • Urban, rural, architectural ways of fashioning space; their social, political, religious and cultural implications.
    • The rise of the individual and the advent of intimacy.
    • Economic networks, insular and European; their influences on daily life in diverse contexts.
    • Religious and cultural networks.
  • Medieval practices of space
    • Social and religious practices: processions, pilgrimages and travels, either real or imagined.
    • Gendered practices of public and private space in the British Middle Ages.
    • Space and war: how did British knights envisage the necessary military engagement with space?
    • The sea: medieval practices and representation of seafaring in the context of medieval conceptions of the sea, real or imagined.
    • The forest and the “wilderness”: places outside social order, which are often fraught with danger and / or prove the loci for spiritual experience (hermitages) or adventure (namely in the case of encounters with fairy and other supernatural beings)

Submission information

The papers, written in English or in French, must be sent before 30 May, 2019 to Fanny Moghaddassi f.moghaddassi@unistra.fr . Etudes Médiévales Anglaises uses double-blind peer review. The stylesheet to be used may be found on our website: https://amaes.jimdo.com/submit-a-paper/

References:

COHEN Jeffrey J., Stone: An Ecology of the Inhuman, University of Minnesota Press, 2015.

COHEN Meredith and MADELINE Fanny, eds, Space in the Medieval West. Places, Territories and Imagined Geographies, Routledge, 2014.

CONKLIN AKBARI, Suzanne, Idols in the East, European Representations of Islam and the Orient, 1100-1450, Cornell University Press, 2009.

Construction de l’espace au Moyen Âge : Pratiques et représentations, Colloque de la SHMESP (Mulhouse, 2006), Presses universitaires de la Sorbonne, 2007.

DE JONG Mayke and THEUWS Frans, eds., Topographies of Power in the Early Middle Ages, Brill, Transformation of the Roman World, 6, 2001.

GAUTIER DALCHE Patrick, L’Espace géographique au Moyen Âge¸ Sismel Edizioni del Galluzo, Micrologus’ Library, 57, 2013.

GILCHRIST Roberta, Gender and Material Culture, The Archaelogy of Religious Women, Routledge, 1994.

HANAWALT Barbara A. & KOLBIALKA Michal, Medieval Practices of Space, University of Minessota Press, 2000.

Uomo e spazio nell alto medioevo, Settimane Di Studio Del Centro Italiano di Studi Sull’ Alto Medioevo, Presso La Sede dell Centro, 2002.

WALLACE David, ed., Europe: A Literary History, 1348-1418, Oxford University Press, 2 vol., 2016.

WEISS Julian and SALIH Sarah, eds., Locating the Middle Ages, The Spaces and Places of Medieval Culture, Boydell & Brewer, King’s College London Centre for Late Antique and Medieval Studies, 2012.

ZUMTHOR Paul, La Mesure du monde, Représentation de l’espace au Moyen Âge, Seuil, 1993.

Member research profile: Dr Julie Davies, Science in an Enchanted World

In a new feature, the ANZAMEMS newsletter is taking the opportunity to highlight the research of some of our members. Dr Julie Davies recently published her book Science in an Enchanted World: Philosophy and Witchcraft in the Work of Joseph Glanvill (Routledge, 2018). She tells us more about her book and what she is working on now…

Dr Julie Davies - photo

Dr Julie Davies

I work primarily on the intellectual history of medieval and early modern Europe. I am motivated by an interest in cosmologies: the way societies have understood how the world works and the role humankind has within in the universe. My research interests include demonology, witchcraft, science and experimental philosophy, theology, metaphysics, mythology and the supernatural. I received my doctorate from the University of Melbourne and am currently research assistant to Charles Zika at the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions at the University of Melbourne. I am also the announcements editor for the International Society for Intellectual History.

Glanvill is well known in the history of both witchcraft and the Royal Society of London. He was, after all, friends with notable figures like Henry More, Robert Boyle and Richard Baxter. However, few scholars have attempted a comprehensive investigation into Glanvill’s eclectic body of work. Science in an Enchanted World: Philosophy and Witchcraft in the Work of Joseph Glanvill is an exploration of the relationship between Glanvill’s work on witchcraft, the Saducismus triumphatus, and the ideas he presented in his well-regarded works on the experimental method of the Royal Society, metaphysics, theology and pastoral care. The result is a multidisciplinary work that offers a unifying perspective on Glanvill’s diverse works and a resource to help future scholars navigate through the multiple editions and versions of Glanvill’s complex corpus.

In current research I am looking at remedies for melancholy and am heading to the Herzog August Bibliothek in early 2019 to compare the work and motivations of some early English and German female botanists. This kicks off my next big project on the place of horticulture, herbalism and botany in the lives of European women. I’m also particularly interested in when scientific and religious practices were recommended as paths towards emotional well-being.

My other recent publications include a collection edited with Michael Pickering A World Enchanted: Magic and the Margins (2014), “Botanizing at Badminton House: The Botanical Pursuits of Mary Somerset, First Duchess of Beaufort” in Domesticity in the Making of Modern Science, edited by Donald Opitz, Brigitte van Tiggelen and Staffan Bergwik (2015) and “German Receptions of the Works of Joseph Glanvill: Philosophical Transmissions from England to Germany in the Late Seventeenth and Early Eighteenth Century” in Intellectual History Review (2016).

You can find Julie on Twitter @JulieD1680 and on Academia.edu at https://unimelb.academia.edu/JulieDavies

ANZAMEMS members who would like to profile their recent book-length publications via the newsletter should contact the editor, amanda.mcvitty@gmail.com. We particularly encourage early career scholars and those with first books to get in touch.

 

Parergon call for proposals: Special themed issues

The ANZAMEMS’ journal Parergon (https://parergon.org/) produces one open issue and one themed issue annually. We now call for proposals for future themed issues, specifically for 2021 (38.2)

Recent themed issues include: 

  • 2016, 33.2 Approaches to Early Modern Nostalgia, guest-edited by Kristine Johanson
  • 2017, 34.2 Exile and Imprisonment in Medieval and Early Modern Europe, guest-edited by Lisa Di Crescenzo and Sally Fisher
  • 2018, 35.2 Translating Medieval Cultures Across Time and Place: A Global Perspective, guest-edited by Saher Amer, Esther S. Klein, and Hélène Sirantoine

Parergon publishes articles on all aspects of medieval and early modern studies, from early medieval through to the eighteenth century, and including the reception and influence of medieval and early modern culture in the modern world. We are particularly interested in research that takes new approaches and crosses traditional disciplinary boundaries.

Parergon asks its authors to achieve international standards of excellence. The article should be substantially original, advance research in the field, and have the potential to make a significant contribution to the critical debate.

Parergon is available in electronic form as part of Project Muse, Australian Public Affairs – Full Text (from 1994), and Humanities Full Text (from 2008). Parergon is included in the Clarivate Analytics Master Journal List of refereed journals and in the European Reference Index for the Humanities (ERIH), and is indexed for nine major database services, including ABELL, IMB and Scopus. 

Themed issues contain up to ten essays, plus the usual reviews section. The guest editor is responsible for setting the theme and drawing up the criteria for the essays. 

Time line 

Proposals for the 2021 issue (38.2) should be submitted to the Editor susan.broomhall@uwa.edu.au by Friday 1 February 2019.

Proposals should contain the following: 

  1. A draft title for the issue.
  2. A statement outlining the rationale for the issue.
  3. Titles and abstracts of all the essays.
  4. A short biographical paragraph for the guest editor(s) and for each contributor.

Proposals will be considered by a selection panel drawn from the Parergon International Editorial Board who will be asked to assess and rank the proposals according to the following criteria:

  1. Suitability for the journal
  2. Originality of contribution to the chosen field
  3. Significance/importance of the proposed theme
  4. Potential for advancing scholarship in a new and exciting way
  5. Range and quality of authors

Guest editors will be notified of the result of their application by the beginning of April 2019. 

The editorial process 

Once a proposal has been accepted: 

  1. The guest editor will commission and pre-select the essays before submitting them to the Parergon Editor by the agreed date (for issue 38.2, 1 June 2020).
  2. The Parergon Editor will arrange for independent and anonymous peer-review in accordance with the journal’s established criteria.
  3. Occasionally a commissioned essay will be judged not suitable for publication in Parergon. This decision will be taken by the Parergon Editor, based on the anonymous expert reviews.
  4. Essays that have already been published or accepted for publication elsewhere are not eligible for inclusion in the journal.

Please send enquiries and proposals to the Editor, Susan Broomhall, at susan.broomhall@uwa.edu.au

Download (PDF, 214KB)

 

Parergon 35.2 is out! Translating medieval cultures across time and place

The latest issue of the ANZAMEMS journal Parergon is now out. This is an exciting interdisciplinary special issue on Translating Medieval Cultures Across Time and Place: A Global Perspective, guest edited by Saher Amer, Esther S. Klein, and Hélène Sirantoine. Parergon 35.1 features seven original research articles and a scholarly introduction, along with our usual wide selection of book reviews and short notices.

ANZAMEMS members and Parergon subscribers will be receiving their print copies in the post soon. You can also access Parergon content via Project MUSE. For further information on accessing Parergon or submitting articles for consideration, visit Parergon.

Here is a preview of the contents of Parergon 35.2:

‘Introduction: Translating Medieval Cultures Across Time and Place: A Global Perspective’
Saher Amer, Esther S. Klein, and Hélène Sirantoine

  1. The Politics of Translation: Knowledge, Dominance, and Interimperial Economies

‘Shahrazad’s 1001 Meditations: Translations in the Inter-Imperial Economy’
Laura Doyle

‘Spiegelungen in Daṇḍin’s Mirror: A Comparative Pursuit in the Translatability of Narrative Modes, Historicity, Prose, and Vernacularism across French and Asian Medieval Historiography’
Ulrich Timme Kragh

‘The Limits of Ongietenisse: Translating Global Imagination in the Old English Letter of Alexander to Aristotle’
Kate Perillo

‘Spreading the Word of Zhu Xi: Xu Heng’s Vernacular Confucianism under Mongol Rule and Beyond’
Esther S. Klein

  1. Cultural Exchange, Identity, and The Promise of New Technologies

‘Histories of the Islamic World in the Chronicles of the Kingdom of Léon (End-Ninth to Mid-Twelfth Centuries)’
Hélène Sirantoine

‘Itz and the Descent of Kukulkan: Central Mexican Influence on Postclassic Maya Thought’
Alexus McLeod

‘Teaching the Global Middle Ages through Technology’
Sahar Amer and Lynn Ramey

Call for book chapters: Predicting the Past (Brill)

Chapter proposals are invited for Predicting the Past. Worldwide Medieval Dream Interpretation, to be published in Brill’s series Reading Medieval Sources. This volume aims to give a high-level survey and analysis of dream-books in the Middles Ages (400-1500 CE) in different parts of the world: Europe, Asia, Africa, Oceania, and the Americas, and to explore their development, dispersal, and typologies. We also intend to investigate issues such as production, use, and audience according to different disciplinary perspectives (e.g. history, literature, art, and religion). We would also welcome reflections on the field – where it currently is and what the future approaches and debates might be.

We are looking for well-sculpted essays which take engagement with dream-books as their main focus, and use dream-books to shed light on particular aspects of medieval society and culture. To be part of the series Reading Medieval Sources, the source itself and its use, value, and application must be central to the essays.

For scholars interested in contributing an essay, please consider the sections of the volume:

1) the different traditions of dream-books and their presence / role in different countries over the Middle Ages (Europe, Africa, Asia, Oceania, the Americas) the materiality of the source, different formats, illustrations, etc.

2) intersections of dream-books with art, literature, censorship, interpretation, symbology, divination, etc.

Please submit your abstract (max. 500 words) and CV to Professor Valerio Cappozzo  (VCAPPOZZ@OLEMISS.EDU) by 30 December, 2018.

CFP Cross-cultural comparison in the premodern world

The Oakley Center, which has its home at Williams College, invites paper proposals for ‘The Global Archive of Comparison’, a conference and subsequent edited volume on the history of cross-cultural comparison in the premodern world. The conference will be held at Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts (26–28 September 2019) and is organized by Alexander Bevilacqua. Anthony Grafton (Princeton) will deliver the keynote lecture.

Drawing on the study of humanistic traditions from across the globe in the era before 1800, the conference aims to assess the many ways comparison has served in the history of cross-cultural study. Through a series of focused case studies, scholars will ask: what forms of analogy, simile, equivalence, etc., did past thinkers employ, and what kinds of comparisons did these enable? How did such intellectual tools facilitate the transmission of texts, religion, or ideas from one context to another? What did they preclude? The goal is to reconstruct the range of ways that people of the past mediated intellectual traditions through comparative mechanisms. The further aim is to demonstrate the relevance of the premodern world to contemporary reflection on comparison.

The conference welcomes the work of advanced doctoral students and both young and established scholars in the fields of history, religion, philosophy, and literature.a.

Proposals — which should include a 500-word abstract, a brief curriculum vitae, and complete current contact information — should be sent by 15 October 2018 to the conference organizer.

Contact Info: 

Oakley Center for the Humanities and Social Sciences
90 Denison Park Drive
Williamstown, MA 01267

Contact Email: 

New Book Series: Critical Emotion Studies (Brill)

Critical Emotion Studies is a peer-reviewed, transdisciplinary series of monographs and edited volumes dedicated to the critical analysis of emotions, meaning that emotions are theorized as contextual, relational, and shifting. While Critical Emotion Studies encompasses a broad and complex range of disciplines and topics of inquiry, it shares three core assumptions: that emotions and reason are not distinct, but are intertwined in all decision-making processes; that emotions, rather than being limited to individual and private experiences, are socially constructed and experienced, particularly through language; and that every culture inculcates a structure of feeling that serves to produce and reproduce dominant cultural values and norms.

The series aims to promote research on issues that are connected to understanding emotions as socially constructed, tied to culture and history, expressed through language and deeply enmeshed in power relations. This may include political and diplomatic approaches, but also those that treat of points of social and cultural convergence, justice, gender, race and ethnicity.

Manuscripts should be at least 80,000 words in length (including footnotes and bibliography). Manuscripts may also include illustrations and other visual material. The editors will consider proposals for original monographs, edited collections, translations, and critical primary source editions.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. For more information, see http://www.brill.com/cres

Series Editor: Simon Koschut, Freie Universität Berlin

Editorial Board

  • Karin M. Fierke, University of St. Andrews
  • Emma Hutchison, The University of Queensland
  • William M. Reddy, Duke University
  • Steven C. Roach, University of South Florida
  • Christian von Scheve, Freie Universität Berlin

CFP for Queens in Waiting: Potential and Prospective Queens, Ambitions and Expectations

We are seeking proposals for essays to be included in a proposed volume on ‘Queens in Waiting’ to be submitted to the Queenship and Power series (Palgrave). The collection seeks to explore the processes of becoming or attempting (successfully or not) to become queen through a collection of case studies of individual women or comparative groupings of women. Potential topics could include but are not limited to:

  • Female heirs (and spares) to the throne
  • The wives of heirs (and spares) to the throne
  • Child Queen regnants waiting to come of age/ wield independent power
  • Female claims in succession wars/disputes
  • Betrothals to / child brides of, Kings or heirs to the throne
  • Wives or mothers of monarchs who had to wait for elevation of status or coronation (for example until the birth of an heir or the death of a husband)
  • The role of potential and rival queens (whether rival or consort) in usurpation or succession wars/disputes
  • Aspirations to queenship
  • Education/preparation of female relatives for queenship
  • Linguistic and cultural preparation of foreign brides for queenship in a new realm
  • Recognition (or not) of status as future queen through title/ grant of wealth or official influence/ status at court / legal status in wills/succession acts etc
  • Assessing and negotiating ‘worthy’ marriages for royal women/ potential brides for a king or heir to the throne.
  • Attempts of non-royal women (or their families) to marry into the succession
  • Careers of women who became or attempted to become queen serving at court
  • Precedence at court between Queens past, present and future (for example relations between queens and their mothers or daughters-in-law, or scenarios where a long-reigning monarch has several generations of potential future Queens in line for the throne)
  • Expectations of/from a future queen – ‘suitability’ for queenship
  • Agency (or not) of individual women in becoming Queen through marriage or through assertion of their own succession rights etc.
  • Multiple attempts by the same woman to become Queen of the same or different realms
  • Understandings of Queenship as a vocation or destiny
  • ‘Pretender’ Queens, exiled Queens

Proposals which cover political, ceremonial and/or representational aspects of any of these topics will be considered and we are open to essays considering different cultural, geographical or chronological contexts.

Proposals of 350-500 words along with a brief CV should be sent to Sarah Betts and Chloë McKenzie at queensinwaiting2018@gmail.com by 15 November 2018.