Category Archives: publication

New issue preview: Parergon 36.1

36.1 CoverANZAMEMS is delighted to advise researchers that the latest issue of the Association’s journal Parergon is now out. Issue 36.1 features 7 original research articles and over 40 book reviews. ANZAMEMS members will receive their print copies by post in the coming weeks. Digital content is available via Project MUSE, Australian Public Affairs – Full Text (Informit) and Humanities Full Text.

The research articles in issue Parergon 36.1 cover a breadth of medieval and early modern topics and disciplines:

Brows of Grace, Nerves of Steel: Malcolm and Macbeth
Elizabeth Mazzola

In Shakespeare’s Macbeth, the legibility of a butcher’s designs is succeeded by the monstrous virtue of his replacement Malcolm, who artfully confuses the social world’s assumptions and habits, its ways of recognizing authority and punishing sin. This article explores Malcolm’s powers in terms of a new politics equally expert at manufacturing fear and imitating grace, with reference to witchcraft trials and to analogues provided by Rembrandt and Hobbes. It also considers theories about the workings of this new politics supplied by social scientists, concluding that Malcolm’s strategies for unleashing evil and its remedy similarly sequester and obscure people from each other.

The Enigmatic Sutton Hoo Ship-Burial: Fresh Insights from Assemblage Theory
Georgina Pitt

The sumptuous Sutton Hoo ship-burial has been much debated since it was discovered nearly eighty years ago, but there is no consensus on its interpretation. Assemblage theory, with its focus on the linkages between people, places, and objects, and the related concept of ‘fittingness’, may provide an alternative explanation that accounts for this ship-burial as both archaeological site and historical event. This article suggests that this ship-burial was a deliberate strategy to cohere and transmit secular political power across the hazardous liminal space between death and succession in troubled times in early seventh-century East Anglia, after the death of King Rædwald.

Language and Thought in Hildegard of Bingen’s Visionary Trilogy: Close and Distant Readings of a Thinker’s Development
Jeroen De Gussem and Dinah Wouters

By combining the methods of distant reading (computational stylistics) and close reading, the authors discuss the development of language and thought in Hildegard of Bingen’s visionary works (Sciuias, Liber uite meritorum and Liber diuinorum operum). The visionary trilogy, although written over the course of three decades, raises the impression of a monolithic and seemingly unchanging voice. Moving beyond this impression, the interdisciplinary analysis presented here reveals that the trilogy exhibits interesting differences at the word level which cannot simply be explained through external historical circumstances (e.g. manuscript transmission or different secretaries). Instead, the results raise pertinent questions regarding the trilogy’s internal development in didactic method, style, and philosophy.

John Harrison: A Case Study of the Acculturation of an Early Modern Briton
Rickie Lette

The important role that the Mediterranean played in England’s development as an imperial power in the early modern period has begun to be appreciated, but more work is required to properly historicize the interactions which occurred during this time and understand their impact. This article argues that to do this it is necessary to move beyond generalized interpretations and examine the impact of encounter at the individual level. Moreover, through examining the experiences of one such sojourner, it demonstrates how a focus on acculturative change can provide novel insights into the consequences of historical encounters between European and non-European peoples.

John Milton’s Samson Agonistes: Deathly Selfhood
Jennifer Lodine-Chaffey

Critical attention to death in Samson Agonistes has been dominated by the question of whether Milton’s drama glorified acts of religious terrorism, a question that involves death but unnecessarily narrows it. I seek to reframe our understanding of Samson by looking not only at his aggressive exploits, but also at his movement towards death. The poem illuminates Samson’s development of what I call a ‘deathly selfhood’, which relies on an interior awareness of who he is, rather than on an outward manifestation of his abilities, and only becomes available to him as he nears death.

Mealtime Sanctity: The Devotional and Social Significance of Mealtimes in The Book of Margery Kempe
Hwanhee Park

This article argues that mealtimes in The Book of Margery Kempe establish Margery’s orthodoxy and demonstrate her sanctity. Mealtimes provide Margery with a sufficiently flexible boundary between private and public for her to express her devotion and reach out to people without incriminating herself as a heretic. Medieval mealtimes, symbolizing community and hierarchy, enable Margery to express her sanctity and be accepted by respected figures. As a result, mealtimes allow Margery’s ministry to succeed at a time of religious dissent.

The Eastern Policy of Alfonso V the Magnanimous (of Aragon), Seen in the Light of His Political Relations with the Bosnian Duke-Herzog Stjepan Vukčić Kosača
Marijan Premović

This article re-assesses political relations between Alfonso V the Magnanimous (r. 1416–58), King of Aragon, Sicily, and Naples, and the Bosnian duke-herzog Stjepan Vukčić Kosača (r. 1435–66), analysing the period between Alfonso V’s conquest of Naples in 1442 until his death in 1458. It considers political developments in the Eastern Adriatic, particularly relations between Alfonso and Stjepan, and the policies that the king, as ruler of Naples, pursued toward the east, in order to argue that Alfonso’s activities in the Balkans were mainly intended to disrupt the interests of Venice and to solidify his rule over southern Italy.

Parergon welcomes article submissions on all aspects of medieval and early modern studies. We are especially interested in material that crosses traditional disciplinary boundaries and takes new approaches. For more information and submission guidelines, visit the Parergon website.

CFP New book series: Premodern Transgressive Literatures

Medieval Institute Publications is inviting proposals for a new book series, Premodern Transgressive Literatures. The Series Editor, Alicia Spencer-Hall, and Editorial Board invite both formal proposals for the series, and more informal queries, from all interested parties.

Premodern Transgressive Literatures takes a decisively political, intersectional, and interdisciplinary approach to medieval and early modern literature. The series supports scholarship which transgresses normative bounds along various axes. This includes the transgression of temporal boundaries which superficially separate the premodern era from our twenty-first century moment.

We aim to show, with insistent urgency, the ways in which the premodern can help us make sense of the modern, and the ways in which cutting-edge modern paradigms can help us better understand established, canonical premodern texts. This series is acutely aware of the role of the scholar in the production of history and the crucial importance of the context of scholarly work: the Academy, with its unique characteristics, both positive and negative. As such, Premodern Transgressive Literatures makes space for provocative discussion about the business of producing—and teaching—transgressive work in the neo-liberalised Academy.

We welcome monographs from established and early career researchers, alongside collections of thematic essays, scholarly editions and translations with substantial introductions and apparatus.

Geographical Scope: Global, including but not limited to: Europe, the Mediterranean, Asia
Chronological Scope: Medieval and early modern world
Keywords: intersectionality, interdisciplinary, literature, culture, medieval, early modern, pedagogy
Editorial Board:
Blake Gutt (University of Michigan), Carissa Harris (Temple University), Jonathan Hsy (George Washington University), Roberta Magnani (Swansea University), Elizabeth Robertson (University of Glasgow)

Full details can be found at: www.wmich.edu/medievalpublications/premodern-transgressive-literatures

If you have any general queries or questions about the series, in the first instance please contact Shannon Cunningham (Acquisitions Editor for Medieval Institute Publications), shannon@smcunningham.com.

Please also feel free to contact the Series Editor, Alicia Spencer-Hall, to discuss the series informally and answer any questions regarding academic fit and so forth: aspencerhall@gmail.com.

Australian Academy of the Humanities Fellowships

The Australian Academy of the Humanities has launched the inaugural John Mulvaney Fellowship. This award honours John Mulvaney AO CMG FBA FSA FRAI FAHA, one of the Academy’s longest serving Fellows and former Academy Secretary. John made a remarkable contribution to humanities scholarship, to the Academy and to the cultural life of the nation. 

In keeping with his deep commitment to Australia’s Indigenous people and cultures, the John Mulvaney Fellowship is an award for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander early career researchers working in any area of the humanities. The Fellowship provides $4000 towards undertaking research or fieldwork in Australia or overseas, including accessing archives and other research materials and connecting with researchers and networks. 

Applications are now open and will close at 5.00pm AEST Wednesday 22 May 2019. Please visit the AAH website for further information including selection criteria and how to apply. 

Travelling fellowships and publication subsidies

A reminder also that applications for AAH Humanities Travelling Fellowships, the Publication Subsidy Scheme, the McCredie Musicological Award, and the Crawford Medal are still open and will close at 5.00pm AEST Monday 15 April 2019

CFP Historical Reflections/Réflexions Historiques

Historical Reflections/Réflexions Historiques (HRRH) has established a well-deserved reputation for publishing high quality articles of wide-ranging interest for over forty years. The journal, which publishes articles in both English and French, is committed to exploring history in an interdisciplinary framework and with a comparative focus. Historical approaches to art, literature, and the social sciences; the history of mentalities and intellectual movements; the terrain where religion and history meet: these are the subjects to which Historical Reflections is devoted. Contributions are invited from all fields of intellectual-cultural history and the history of religion and mentalities.

Some specific themes include:

  • Music history
  • Social policies and societal change (including studies with a comparative focus)
  • Material culture and emotions
  • Architectural and garden history
  • Small businesses
  • Colonial/imperial studies

Manuscript Submission

The editorial board welcomes submissions for publication in English or French. Authors should submit articles as email attachments, formatted as Microsoft Word or Rich Text Format files. Please note that all correspondence will take place via email. Send submissions and complete contact information to the editor, Elizabeth Macknight at e.macknight@abdn.ac.uk.

Have other questions? Please refer to the various Berghahn Info for Authors pages for general information and guidelines including topics such as article usage and permissions for Berghahn journal article authors (www.berghahnjournals.com/historical-reflections).

Indexed in:

  • Arts & Humanities Citation Index (Web of Science)
  • Scopus
  • Historical Abstracts
  • ERIH PLUS

For a full listing of indices, please visit the website www.berghahnjournals.com/historical-reflections

Contact: info@berghahnjournals.com

Call for contributors English Consorts: Power, Influence, Dynasty

The editors of English Consorts: Power, Influence, Dynasty – a four-volume series to be published in Palgrave Macmillan’s “Queenship and Power” series – are still seeking abstracts for a number of consorts. A revised Call for Contributors has been issued with a deadline of 1 May 2019.

English Consorts: Power, Influence, Dynasty aims to provide short, focused, well-researched, and refereed biographies of all of the English consorts since the Conquest. While the editors are keen to hear from prospective authors on any consort, they are especially looking for submissions on:

Norman to Early Plantagenet Consorts:
Margaret of France (wife of Henry the Young King)
Isabella of Gloucester (wife of King John)

Later Plantagenet and the Wars of the Roses Consorts:
Isabella de Valois

Tudor and Stuart Consorts:
Elizabeth of York
Katherine of Aragon
Elizabeth Cromwell and Dorothy Cromwell (a double-biography of the wives of the Lords Protectors Cromwell)

Hanoverian to Windsor Consorts:
Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz
Caroline of Brunswick
Queen Elizabeth, The Queen Mother
Prince Philip, The Duke of Edinburgh

The Editors are happy to field questions and queries and can be contacted at: englishconsorts@gmail.com

Full details are available at the project website: https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/ren/about_us/centrestaff/norrie-consorts

New member publication: Contemporary Chaucer across the Centuries

Contemporary Chaucer across the Centuries cover imageCongratulations to ANZAMEMS members Helen Hickey, Anne McKendry and Melissa Raine on the publication of their co-edited collection Contemporary Chaucer across the Centuries (Manchester University Press, 2018). It is doubly pleasing that the book is a festschrift for long-time ANZAMEMS member and past president Stephanie Trigg, who has contributed so much to the Association and to the wider field of medieval and early modern studies. Below, the editors reflect on what inspired their book and the diverse approaches contributors take to its unifying themes.

“We were delighted to take up the opportunity to celebrate Stephanie Trigg’s academic achievements as well as her tireless fostering of scholarly communities throughout her career. Our intention was to create a vibrant collection that attests to her achievements and her generosity as a researcher. We felt that within Stephanie’s wide-ranging interests, Geoffrey Chaucer was central to the progression of her own ideas and her sphere of influence. For over 700 years, many readers have claimed powerful personal connections not only with Chaucer’s writing, but with the author himself. Stephanie’s Congenial Souls (2001) delved deeply into the desires that Chaucer’s literary output has both created and fed throughout those seven centuries. This mode of inquiry, which she describes as a symptomatic long history, makes explicit the stakes and the manoeuvres that give shape to the experience of communing with the Chaucerian text, its author, and the age in which he lived, claims that are at times proprietorial and exclusive, and at others challenging and resistant. Stephanie has since employed this methodology to interrogate hierarchised distinctions between scholarly and creative responses to medieval culture, the latter often known as medievalism. Congenial Souls therefore offers an important contribution to Chaucer scholarship, but further lays down groundwork for researchers of medieval culture to reflect on the broader significance of their own practices.

Two decades after the publication of Congenial Souls, we felt it was timely to review current debates surrounding the traditions, emotions and intellectual underpinnings of Chaucer scholarship, and the implications of this work for researching the Middle Ages more generally. Contemporary Chaucer across the Centuries showcases the contributions of fourteen outstanding thinkers in the field who explore both Chaucer’s writing and the longue durée of its reception. The diversity of topics and approaches evinces the dynamic and innovative research that Chaucer’s writing continues to inspire, as well as the resonance of Stephanie’s insights within contemporary Chaucer research.

Each essay stands alone as a significant contribution to Chaucer scholarship, in some cases drawing attention to features of Chaucer’s poetic techniques and intertextual allusions that have gone unnoticed, despite extensive poring over Chaucer’s oeuvre. Some are inspired by or engage directly with Stephanie’s work on authorship, emotions and medievalism to produce fresh insights into the faces, bodies and environments found within Chaucer’s narratives; others consider emotions and connection with Chaucer himself in critical analyses as well as in creative forms such as cinema and stand-up comedy.

The historical development of Chaucer’s legacy is represented in a variety of contexts, from scribal activity and early print culture through to contests over national identity in the nineteenth century. Several essays address how critical trends and challenges both shape and are impacted by Chaucer’s canonical status, and many individual essays attend to combinations of these themes. Together, they create a dialogue about what the past means in our own present moment, and why Chaucer continues to be such a source of fascination and reward. These essays confirm that we are never truly “done” with the past; we continue to return with new questions to Chaucer’s writing and the astonishing experience of immediacy that it produces in readers even as temporal distance increases. The changing present compels us to reconsider, re-evaluate, and reappraise the connections between literary traditions and contemporary scholarship, and past and present more broadly.

Contemporary Chaucer across the Centuries is also inflected by the diversity of our own research interests. Melissa is currently working on children’s voices in both medieval literature and contemporary Australian culture. In both contexts, she explores how historically specific ideas about childhood, especially the relationships of children with adults, shape the communication of actual and imagined children, including some created by Chaucer. Anne is at the proofing stage of her first monograph, Medieval Crime Fiction: A Critical Overview, which will be published by McFarland in April and offers the first sustained analysis of this neglected but extremely popular example of contemporary medievalism. She is also finalising an article for Exemplaria that considers Chaucer’s Knight’s Tale through Georges Bataille’s theory of an economics of waste. Helen is currently working on feet in medieval and early modern poetics and art, and on ideas of beauty and aesthetics in medieval European poetry. She is completing a chapter on Thomas Hoccleve’s poetics through theories of embodiment.

Helen M. Hickey, Anne McKendry and Melissa Raine are Research Associates at the University of Melbourne’s School of Culture and Communication. A substantial preview of Contemporary Chaucer across the Centuries can be downloaded for free from the publisher’s website: http://www.manchesteruniversitypress.co.uk/9781526129154/

ANZAMEMS members wishing to promote their research through the ANZAMEMS newsletter are invited to email the editor, Amanda McVitty. We particularly welcome approaches from early career scholars.

 

Royal Studies Journal 2019 Book and Article Prizes

Entries are now open for the Royal Studies Journal (RSJ) 2019 Annual Book and Early Career/Post-Graduate Researcher’s Article Prizes.

Book Prize

Launched in June 2015, the Royal Studies Journal Annual Book Prize recognizes
outstanding contributions to the field of royal studies. Authors, publishers, Royal Studies Network (RSN) members, or other interested parties may nominate books, either monographs or edited collections, published during the previous two calendar years (2017-18). Self-nomination is accepted.

Entries must be submitted by 1 March, 2019.

For more information and to register a nomination, go to https://www.rsj.winchester.ac.uk/about/prizes/ and https://royalstudiesjournal.wordpress.com/2018/07/17/cccu-prizes-2018

Early Career Researcher/Post-Graduate Annual Article Prize

Launched in June 2015, the RSJ Early Career and Post-Graduate Researcher’s prize is
awarded annually to a current Early Career or Post-Graduate Researcher for the best
published or unpublished scholarly article-length work (approx. 5,000-10,000 words)
based on original research on any topic that falls within the scope of royal studies.

Contributions are accepted on a year-round basis, with a submission deadline of 1 March, 2019 for inclusion in the current year’s prize campaign. Articles (approx. 5,000-10,000
words) should be submitted in electronic form.

For more information go to https://www.rsj.winchester.ac.uk/about/prizes/ and
https://royalstudiesjournal.wordpress.com/2018/07/17/cccu-prizes-2018/

CFP for Cerae Volume 6 on ‘Landscapes’

Ceræ: An Australasian Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies is calling for submissions for Volume Six on the theme of ‘Landscapes’. ‘Landscapes’ are composed of complementary and contradictory aspects that interact with, influence and impact upon one another: the natural environment – encompassing plants, animals, and underlying earth itself in all parts of the world – and the imprint of human society on the environment in both physical and intellectual capacities. We can refer to a defined geographic area that is associated with a specific historic event, person, or culture, as well as to the ways in which people interact with their environment throughout time and space. How individuals and societies have interacted with their natural environment, have been limited by it, have tried to shape it, control it, and ultimately have changed it over many centuries of interaction.

Topics may include but are not limited to:

  • investigations on urban and/or rural landscapes
  • relationships with the natural world
  • visual, textual and material representations of landscapes
  • non-visual sensory perceptions of the natural world
  • land-forming, land reclamation, and land loss
  • landscape as metaphor
  • landscape aesthetics
  • ecocriticism
  • cultural landscapes
  • linguistic landscapes
  • mythic landscapes
  • spiritual landscapes
  • the landscapes of conversion, faith and holiness
  • the impact of climate change on medieval and early modern landscapes
  • archaeological landscapes of the past within the present
  • industrial vs agricultural cultural landscapes

Cerae invites submissions encompassing all aspects of the late classical, medieval and early modern world. There are no geographical restrictions. As an interdisciplinary journal, Ceræ encourages submissions across the fields of archaeology, art history, historical ecology, literature, intellectual history, musicology, politics, social studies and beyond.

Articles should be approximately 5000-7000 words. Ceræ particularly encourages submissions from postgraduates and early career researchers. Further details regarding submission and author guidelines including the journal style sheet can be found online at: http://openjournals.arts.uwa.edu.au/index.php/cerae/about/submissions. Non-themed submissions are welcome at any point throughout the year.
The deadline for themed submissions will be 28 February 2019.

Essay Prizes

Ceræ is pleased to offer a prize of $200 (AUD), which will be awarded to the best article in volume 6 on the theme of ‘Landscapes’ by a post-graduate student or early-career researcher.

All further enquiries are most welcome and can be directed to the editor at editorcerae@gmail.com.

Call for contributions: Robin Hood Studies

The Bulletin of the International Association for Robin Hood Studies (https://bulletin.iarhs.org) is seeking submissions for future volumes. The Bulletin is the official journal of the International Association for Robin Hood Studies. It is a fully digital, open access, and double-blind peer reviewed journal and is actively indexed in the MLA International Bibliography. In keeping with the Robin Hood tradition, authors retain their rights to their own materials.

Articles are generally 4,000-8,000 words long. Please see the journal’s website for additional submission guidelines.

We invite scholars to submit articles or essays detailing original research on any aspect of the Robin Hood tradition. Submission is via the web, and preliminary inquiries or questions may be directed to Valerie Johnson vjohnso6@montevallo.edu (University of Montevallo) and Alexander Kaufman alkaufman@bsu.edu (Ball State University).

New member publication: Women and Power at the French Court, 1483-1563

Congratulations to ANZAMEMS’ member and Parergon journal editor Professor Susan Broomhall on the publication of a new edited collection, Women and Power at the French Court, 1483-1563 (Amsterdam University Press, 2018).

Cover image Women and Power bookWomen and Power at the French Court, 1483—1563 explores the ways in which a range of women “ as consorts, regents, mistresses, factional power players, attendants at court, or as objects of courtly patronage “ wielded power in order to advance individual, familial, and factional agendas at the early sixteenth-century French court. Spring-boarding from the burgeoning scholarship of gender, the political, and power in early modern Europe, the collection provides a perspective from the French court, from the reigns of Charles VIII to Henri II, a time when the French court was a renowned center of culture and at which women played important roles. Crossdisciplinary in its perspectives, these essays by historians, art and literary scholars investigate the dynamic operations of gendered power in political acts, recognized status as queens and regents, ritualized behaviors such as gift-giving, educational coteries, and through social networking, literary and artistic patronage, female authorship, and epistolary strategies.

For more information, along with a downloadable Introduction and Table of Contents, please visit the AUP website https://www.aup.nl/en/book/9789462983427/women-and-power-at-the-french-court-1483-1563