Author Archives: ANZAMEMS

CFP Complaint and Grievance: Literary Traditions

Paper proposals are invited for a two-day symposium on Complaint and Grievance: Literary Traditions
14-15 February 2019
National Library of New Zealand / Victoria University of Wellington, NZ.

‘O woe is me / To have seen what I have seen, see what I see’. Shakespeare’s Ophelia, wooed and cast aside by her one-time lover, Hamlet, amplifies her woe in the open-ended expression of grief that characterises complaint, a rhetorical mode that proliferates from the poetry of Ovid to the Bible, from the Renaissance to the modern day.

This symposium explores the literature of complaint and grievance, centring on the texts of the Renaissance but welcoming contributions from related areas. Shakespeare (A Lover’s Complaint) and Spenser (Complaints) are central authors of Renaissance complaint, but who else wrote complaint literature, why, and to what effect? Female-voiced complaint was fashionable in the high poetic culture of the 1590s, but what happens to complaint when it is taken up by early modern women writers? What forms—and what purposes—does the literature of complaint and grievance take on in non-elite or manuscript spheres, in miscellanies, commonplace books, petitions, street satires, ballads and songs? What are the classical and biblical traditions on which Renaissance complaint is based? And what happens to complaint after the Renaissance, in Romantic poetry, in the reading and writing cultures of the British colonial world, in contemporary poetry, and in the #metoo movement?

Keynote speakers:

  • Professor Danielle Clarke, University College, Dublin
  • Professor Kate Lilley, University of Sydney
  • Professor Rosalind Smith, University of Newcastle, Australia

We invite anyone with an interest in the literature of complaint and the politics of grievance to submit a 250-word paper proposal by 31 October 2018 to the conference organiser, Sarah.Ross@vuw.ac.nz.

This conference is supported by the Royal Society of New Zealand’s Marsden Fund, as part of the three-year project ‘Woe is me: Women and Complaint in the English Renaissance’.

CFP Animal/Language: An Interdisciplinary Conference

Animal/Language: An Interdisciplinary Conference will be held in conjunction with the art exhibition “Assembling Animal Communication” at Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX
21-23 March 2019.

Animals and language have a complicated relationship with one another in human understanding. Every period of history evinces a fascination with the diverse modes of communicative exchange and possibilities of linguistic community that exist both within and between species. Recent critics of anthropocentrism are far from the first to question the supposed muteness of the “dumb animal” and its ontological and ethical ramifications. Various cultures have historically attributed language to animals, and we have developed an increasingly sophisticated scientific understanding of the complex non-verbal communicative systems that animals use among themselves. New research complements millennia of human-animal communication in the contexts of work, play, and domestic life.

Some people have extensive experience with real, live animals. Some primarily encounter animals as products of the food industry. Some focus on animal representations in text or image, or deploy the abstract figure of “the animal” as limit or counterpart of the
human. These interactions condition different ways of “thinking with animals,” including: using them in and as language or in experimentation, recruiting them as symbols and metaphors, incorporating them into idiomatic expressions, projecting moral values onto them, and ventriloquizing them for purposes of cultural critique. A vast archive of literary, artistic, philosophical, historical, religious, and scientific explorations testifies that the boundaries and complementarities relating animals and language have always captured the human imagination.

Animal/Language aims to create an interdisciplinary dialogue on the relationship between “animals” and “language” that considers both what connects and what separates these two key terms. The conference hopes to generate new scientific inquires and creative synergies by initiating conversation and exchange among scholars in the arts, humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences. We therefore invite researchers from all fields, periods, and geographical areas to propose contributions engaging questions such as:

  • What are the real, imagined, or potential relationships between animals and language(s)?
  • What are animal languages?
  • What spaces or functions does the animal occupy within human language and cultural
  • representation?
  • What is the role of animals in aesthetic or artistic meaning-making processes?
  • How do our interactions with animals shape our conceptions of animals and language?
  • How and why do we communicate with animals?
  • How and why do animals communicate with us?
  • How and why do animals communicate with one another?
  • What philosophical, ethical, and political questions are raised by different ways of
  • affirming and denying connections between animals and language?
  • How does the question of animal language connect to issues of gender and class?
  • How should any of the above questions be historicized?

The conference will be held in conjunction with the art exhibition “Assembling Animal Communication”, featuring the work of artists Catherine Chalmers, Catherine Clover, Darcie DeAngelo, Lee Deigaard and Maria Lux. Scheduled events will also include live canine and equine communication demonstrations. The conference will have no registration fees; further details regarding accommodations will be provided on the conference website: https://www.depts.ttu.edu/classic_modern/AnimalLanguageConference.php

Proposal Submission Deadline: 30 September, 2018

Proposals for 20-minute papers should be no more than 300 words long and include 3-5 keywords identifying your discipline and topic(s). All abstracts will be reviewed anonymously; please provide author name(s) and affiliations in your submission email, but omit them from your abstract itself. Please submit all proposals (in .docx or .pdf form) and questions to animallanguage2019@gmail.com. Accepted participants will be notified in early November.

 
 

Funded MA Scholarship at Victoria University of Wellington

This scholarship is being offered as part of Associate Professor Sarah Ross’s Royal Society of New Zealand Marsden Funded project on “Woe is Me: Women and Complaint in Renaissance England”. The scholarship is open to both New Zealand and Australian applicants.

The project examines English Renaissance women’s engagement with complaint, a powerful and ubiquitous rhetorical more that voices erotic, religious, and political protest and loss. In texts from Spenser’s Complaints to Shakespeare’s play A Lover’s Complaint, this literature foregrounds the voices and bodies of lamenting women, who rail against fickle lovers, harsh deities, or unfavourable times. In the foundational literature on complaint, however, the mode is largely understood as male-authored, an act of literary ventriloquy. Scholars have no collective sense of how Renaissance women writers uses this culturally central mode.

To tackle this lacuna, this Marsden project brings together an internationally recognised research team: Sarah Ross at Victoria University of Wellington; Professor Rosalind Smith at the University of Newcastle, Australia; and Professor Michelle O’Callaghan at the University of Reading. Together, the team is undertaking the first comprehensive interrogation of Renaissance women’s engagement with complaint as writers, readers, patrons, collaborators, editors, and performers. Exploring elite literary texts alongside religious works, gallows confessions, popular ballads and songs, and examining printed works alongside manuscript literatures, the project is producing a new account of how the voices of the disempowered, railing against their circumstances, helped to shaped the literary and social cultures of the English Renaissance.

Applications are invited for MA theses that would benefit from being conducted within this project team environment. Possible focuses include early modern poetry of complaint (amorous, religious, political), poetic forms (sonnets, dialogues, meditations), religious or political prose forms, print or manuscript literatures, and/or categories of female and male authorship.

Students who apply for this scholarship should have a First-Class Honours degree in English Literature. They should also demonstrate a strong background in early modern studies, and outstanding research potential.

Applications close 1 November 2018.

For further information and to apply, please visit the Victoria University of Wellington website.

 

 

SMFS Best Article of Medieval Feminist Scholarship Prize

The call for nominations and submissions for the 2019 Society of Medieval Feminist Scholarship (SMFS) Best Article of Medieval Feminist Scholarship Prize is now open. Articles published in calendar years 2017 and 2018 will be considered for this prize.

Articles submitted for this prize will be assessed on both scholarly merit and relevance to the remit of SMFS. Topics are open, including issues regarding women, gender, trans* studies, feminist approaches and theory, and intersectionality.  Range of study must, however, focus on the medieval period (ca. 500 to 1500).

Deadline for submissions is 1 December 2018.  Announcement of prizewinner will occur in late February/early March.

Please send all submissions electronically (via email), in an attached OFFICIAL pdf version/file of the article with the publication information clearly identified, to Linda Mitchell: mitchellli@umkc.edu. Make sure to include all contact information for the author.

Call for applications: Hurst Summer Institute in Legal History

The American Society for Legal History and the Institute for Legal Studies at the University of Wisconsin Law School are pleased to invite applications for the tenth biennial Hurst Summer Institute in Legal History, to be held 9-22 June 2019 at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

The purpose of the Hurst Institute is to advance the approach to legal scholarship fostered by J. Willard Hurst in his teaching, mentoring, and scholarship. The Hurst Institute assists scholars from law, history, and other disciplines in pursuing research on the legal history of any part of the world.

The 2019 Hurst Institute will be led by Mitra Sharafi, Professor of Law and Legal Studies (with History affiliation) at University of Wisconsin–Madison. The two‑week program features presentations by guest scholars, discussions of core readings in legal history, and analysis of the work of the participants in the Institute. The ASLH Hurst Selection Committee will select twelve Fellows to participate in this event.

Applicant Qualifications

Scholars in law, history and other disciplines pursuing research on legal history of any part of the world are eligible to apply. Preference will be given to applications from scholars at an early stage of their career (beginning faculty members, doctoral students who have completed or almost completed their dissertations, and J.D. graduates with appropriate backgrounds).

Fellowship Requirements

Fellows are expected to be in residence for the entire two‑week term of the Institute, to participate in all program activities of the Institute, and to give an informal works‑in‑progress presentation in the second week of the Institute. Fellows are expected to engage with scholars from other fields and to foster an atmosphere of collegiality.

Application Deadline: 3 December, 2018

Application Process

(1) Submit the following materials in a single pdf file starting with your last name to ils@law.wisc.edu. Multiple attachments will not be accepted.

  • Curriculum Vitae with your complete contact information.
  • Statement of Purpose (maximum 500 words) describing your current work, specific research interests, and the broader perspectives on legal history that inform your work.

(2) Arrange to have two letters of recommendation sent electronically as a pdf files (these must be on institutional letterhead and signed) to ils@law.wisc.edu by the deadline.

Please note that late or incomplete applications will not be accepted.

 

CFP: Gender and Medieval Studies 2019 – Gender and Aliens

Paper and poster submissions are invited for the Gender and Medieval Studies 2019 conference, to be held at Durham University, 7-10 January 2019. The conference theme is ‘Gender and Aliens’.

In recent years discourse around ‘aliens’, as migrants living in modern nation-states, has been highly polarised, and the status of people who are technically termed legal or illegal aliens by the governments of those states has often been hotly contested. It is evident from studies of the past, however, that the movement of people is not a recent phenomenon: in the medieval west, one of the Latin terms applied to such people was alieni (‘foreigners’, or ‘strangers’), and it is clear from the surviving evidence that there were many people in the Middle Ages who could be, and indeed were, identified as aliens. This conference aims to stimulate debate about the ways in which gender intersected with and related to the idea of such aliens – and, more broadly, alienation – in the whole medieval world from c. 400 to c. 1500. The organisers welcome proposals for papers on any topic related to gender and aliens or alienation, broadly construed, and encourage submissions relating to the world beyond Europe. Papers might consider topics such as:

  • refugees, immigrants, emigrants
  • inclusion and exclusion
  • alterity and difference
  • outlaws, the law, legality
  • marginalised or disenfranchised groups
  • non-normative bodies, illness, disability
  • acculturation
  • imagined geographies
  • borders and frontiers
  • ethnicity and identity
  • slavery and slaves

In addition to sessions of papers, the conference will also include a poster session. Proposals for a 20-minute paper or for a poster can be submitted at https://tinyurl.com/gms2019submit by September 30th 2018.

The conference organisers are also happy to consider proposals for other kinds of presentation. Please contact the organisers at gmsconference2019@gmail.com to discuss these.

Some travel bursaries will be available for students and unwaged delegates to attend this conference. Please see http://medievalgender.co.uk/ for details.

Australasian Centre for Italian Studies Jo-Anne Duggan Prize 2019

To honour the creative, artistic and scholarly legacy of the late Jo-Anne Duggan, the Australasian Centre for Italian Studies (ACIS) announces the third round of the biennial prize for an original essay and a creative work with exegesis.

The award is open to early career researchers, higher degree or undergraduate students from an Australasian institution, on any topic relating to Italian Studies from disciplinary or interdisciplinary areas. This could include Anthropology, Archaeology, Classics, Cultural Studies, History, Legal and Political Studies, Linguistics and Languages, Literature, Media Studies, Museum Studies, Philosophy, Studies of Religion, Translation Studies, and Visual Arts.

The deadline for entries for the Prize is: 29 October, 2018.

For further information and to enter, please visit https://acis.org.au/2018/04/10/call-for-entries-jo-anne-duggan-prize-2019/

Ransom Center Research Fellowships

The Ransom Center is an internationally renowned humanities research library and museum at The University of Texas at Austin. For its 2019–2020 fellowship program, the Ransom Center will award 10 dissertation fellowships and up to 50 postdoctoral fellowships for projects that require substantial on-site use of its collections. The collections support research in all areas of the humanities, including literature, photography, film, art, the performing arts, music, and cultural history. Fellowships are open to individuals of any nationality.

Among the several hundred items in the Medieval and Early Modern Collection and the Eastern Manuscript Collection are Ptolemaic papyri of the third to first century B.C., an eleventh-century codex from the monastery at Tegernsee, the richly illuminated Chronicles (ca. 1450) of Jean Froissart (1337-1404) and the fifteenth-century Belleville Book of Hours. There are also important holdings in British history and the history of science.

For further information and to apply, visit http://www.hrc.utexas.edu/research/fellowships/application/

Application deadline: 15 November 2018.

ANZAMEMS 2019: CFP deadline extended to 15 September

The deadline to submit paper abstracts and panel/roundtable proposals for the ANZAMEMS 2019 Conference (5-8 February 2019 in Sydney, Australia) has been extended until Friday, 15 September.

The theme for ANZAMEMS 2019 is Categories, Boundaries, Horizons. Categories and boundaries help us to define our fields of knowledge and subjects of inquiry, but can also contain and limit our perspectives. The concept of category emerges etymologically from the experience of speaking in an assembly, a dialogic forum in which new ways of explaining can emerge. Boundaries and horizons are intertwined in their meanings, pointing to the limits of subjectivity, and inviting investigation beyond current understanding into new ways of connecting experience and knowledge.

Papers, panels, and streams are invited to explore all aspects of this theme, including, but not limited to:

  • the limitations of inherited categorization and definition
  • race, gender, class, and dis/ability boundaries and categories
  • encounters across boundaries, through material, cultural, and social exchange
  • the categorization of the human and animal
  • national and religious boundaries and categorization
  • the role of interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary research
  • temporal boundaries and categories, including questions of periodization

Proposals for papers on all aspects of the medieval and early modern are also welcome.

For more information and to submit a proposal, visit the website here:
https://anzamemsconference2019.wordpress.com/call-for-papers/

Applicants for Travel Bursaries and the George Yule Prize should apply by 30 September 2018. for more information, see https://anzamemsconference2019.wordpress.com/bursaries-prizes/

Vacancy: Historian at the Office of Treaty Settlements, NZ Ministry of Justice

The Historian team at Crown-Maori Relations (the new entity now housing the Office of Treaty Settlements) is hiring for a permanent role for a historian.

You’ll participate in front-line negotiations of historical Treaty of Waitangi claims and provide historical advice to inform the negotiations. You’ll be part of a team that assists iwi groups, and develops meaningful redress packages for claimants. The team also provides historical advice to inform decisions on applications for customary rights under the Marine and Coastal Area Act 2011 (MACA).

For full details and to apply, see https://jobs.govt.nz/jobs/MOJ-13534a

Applications close on 14 September.