Category Archives: short course

Melbourne School of Continental Philosophy: Winter School 2017

The Melbourne School of Continental Philosophy: Winter School 2017

The Melbourne School of Continental Philosophy is proud to present the 2017 Philosophy Winter School Curriculum. We have six courses on offer. Substantial discounts apply for those doing multiple courses. All courses are available for distance enrolment.

https://mscp.org.au/courses/winter-school-2017

Where: Kathleen Syme Centre, Faraday St, Carlton; and 1888 Building, Grattan St, The University of Melbourne, Parkville.

Tues 6.30-8.30pm Starting 20 June
Hannah Arendt’s contemplative turn and The Life of the Mind
Lecturer: Dr Lenka Ucnik

Wed 6.30-8.30pm Starting 21 June
A Russian Nietzsche and a Russian Dostoevsky
Lecturer: Dr Valery Vinogradovs

10am-12noon 17-21 July
Heidegger, The Fundamental Concepts of Metaphysics
Lecturer: Dr Mark Hewson

12.30-2.30pm 17-21 July
Introduction to the Continental Philosophy of Music
Lecturer: Dr Rhonda Siu

3-5pm 17-21 July
Marie-José Mondzain: Image, Icon, Economy: the Byzantine Origins of the
Contemporary Imaginary

Lecturer: Robyn Adler

5.30-7.30pm 17-21 July
Deleuze and Guattari?s Political Philosophy
Lecturer: Dr Jon Roffe

Templa Winter School – Call For Applications

Templa Winter School
Girona, Spain
18-19 December, 2017

Citizen Cathedrals in the Middle Ages: image, institutions, networks
Proposal by: Gerardo Boto, Vincent Debiais, Xènia Granero and Anabel Moreno.
TEMPLA. Institut de Recerca Històrica, Universitat de Girona
templa.templamedieval.com

TEMPLA is a permanent workshop of Medieval Studies composed of specialists from universities, museums and archives from different parts of Spain, Europe and in particular Catalonia. The members of this team share common interests as well as complementary areas of expertise. The impact of its research and interactions with experts from other disciplines are reflected in its specific research projects and academic activities, which in turn are disseminated in annually organised scientific meetings and resulting publications.

TEMPLA members actively seek to collaborate with different research groups and scientific institutions. They aim to facilitate exchanges among researchers and to stimulate scientific debates relating to visual programs and spatial organization from the Middle Ages. Particular attention is devoted to the liturgical influences and architectural scenery and to reflection on the social and academic status of research into Middle Ages art and culture.

THEMES AND OBJECTIVE:
With the aim of bringing together young researchers and exchanging ideas and hypotheses regarding new trends in medieval art history, TEMPLA is organizing a scientific training session in Girona (Spain) on 18 and 19 December 2017. This winter school will discuss the concept and expression of the “citizen cathedral” as it has developed in European bishoprics from medieval to modern times.

The cathedral is the most important building in a city, both for its symbolic value and visual presence as a defining element within the urban landscape. It is an indispensable part of a city’s
history due to its great influence on the city’s development and growth. In this regard, for numerous cathedrals, medieval citizens played a decisive role in their architectural genesis, in the definition of their spaces, in the decorative elements and in the activities that took place in their interiors or surroundings. The municipal government of the city, the guilds, the brotherhoods and wealthy families all contributed to these architectural works by promoting chapels, improvements of the urban environment, architectural reforms, or sculptural, pictorial and epigraphic programs, and participated in civic rituals, festivities and the worship of saints.

Gothic cathedrals were also intended to act as symbols and images of the expanding cities, thus generating a discourse of power not only for the citizens, but also for the municipal government and, occasionally, for rival dioceses. From the sixth century, the episcopal city was called civitas, thus inextricably entwining the building with the town. The cathedral was the city’s nerve centre in two ways: first, as a religious centre that welcomed the community by providing them with a
meeting place and by marking the patterns of their daily live; and second, as a social, political and economic centre in the urban environment where bishops and councils played an important role.

For this reason, the 2017 TEMPLA winter school aims to reflect on the civic-humanist dimension that defines the cathedral and on the links it establishes with the city and, therefore, with its
citizens. It will also focus on different groups and individuals and their use of the cathedral as a scenario for their activities of patronage, and on the discourse of power between the citizens and the civil and religious institutions.

SCIENTIFIC OBJECTIVES OF THE TEMPLA WINTER SCHOOL 2017:

  • To analyse the relationship between the cathedral and citizens in terms of the different factors (institutional, economic, topographical, architectural, etc.) that help define the
    cathedral within the medieval city and the surrounding urban environment.
  • To investigate the work of cathedral schools open to non-clerical citizens and the care received in hospitals by non-clerical residents or outsiders.
  • To examine the written and visual documentation of the cathedral for traces of this relation and of these exchanges between the city and the individuals involved in cathedral life.
  • To propose a definition for the concept of the “citizen cathedral” that takes into account the city vs. cathedral relationship.
  • To use the previous points to establish new approaches and multidisciplinary research in the institutional and citizen environment of European cathedrals from the Middle Ages to the current day.

APPLICANTS AND PARTICIPATION:
This scientific meeting is intended to host a small number of participants: around 10 researchers will be invited to present their studies. Participants are expected to actively take part in the discussions of all presentations. All researchers should be able to benefit from input from other specialists. The presentations and debates can be held in Spanish, French, Italian or English.

Format: The debates will take place for a day and a half. The day before the conference, participants will have the opportunity to visit the city of Girona. Also, at the end of the conference, there will be a tour of some of the most outstanding enclaves of the city that reflect in situ their specificities and the role of citizens in the planning and development of the cathedral and its urban environment.

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS:
TEMPLA WINTER SCHOOL is aimed at junior pre- and post-doctoral researchers in the field of art history, history and liturgical studies. The applicants must submit:

  • a letter of motivation including their research interests,
  • a one-page résumé,
  • a document (up to 300 words) outlining their proposed presentation.
  • These documents may be written in Spanish, French, Italian or English.
  • The documents must be sent before 30 July 2017 to xenia.granero@urv.cat, anabel.moreno@udg.edu.

Candidates will receive a response by 1 September 2017. The selected researchers will have until 15 October to submit to the organizers a draft of the ideas they intend to present, the main images linked to their speech and a brief bibliography. This documentation will be used to make a dossier for the other attendees in order to facilitate the discussions and exchanges.

VENUE AND ACCOMMODATION:
The conference will take place in the Faculty of Arts of the University of Girona. The costs of accommodation and other common activities will be covered by the organizers. Participants must pay their own travel expenses.

Collaborators in the TEMPLA WINTER SCHOOL 2017:

  • Financial support: Projecte RecerCaixa 2015: “LANDSCAPE AND IDENTITARIAN HERITAGE OF EUROPE: CATHEDRAL CITIES AS LIVING MEMORIES” [Acronim: ID_EURITAGE]
  • Institut de Recerca Històrica Ud

Devotion, Gender and the Body in the Religious Cultures of Europe 1100-1800: PATS and Symposium – Call For Applications Extended to 15 June

Religious History Association
“Devotion, Gender and the Body in the Religious Cultures of Europe 1100-1800”

A Postgraduate Advanced Training Seminar (PATS) and Symposium

  • Friday 18 August 2017 at Monash University (Clayton Campus): 11am-5pm
  • Saturday 19 August 2017 at Pilgrim Theological College, College Crescent, Parkville: 9:30am-4:30pm

The Religious History Association is keen to promote the study of religious history across a wide range of chronological periods and religious traditions. To this end, it is hosting a postgraduate advanced training seminar (PATS) and symposium, held on Friday 18 August under the auspices of the Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Monash University, at its Clayton Campus, and on Saturday 19 August at Pilgrim Theological College (part of the University of Divinity), College Crescent, Parkville.

Religious devotion has always been profoundly shaped by broader assumptions in society about gender and the body, involving access to the divine through the senses, the emotions and materiality. While the practice of theology and preaching has often been perceived as an exercise dominated by men, devotional practices have often been pursued by both men and women, providing a possibility to examine the impact of both gender and materiality in shaping religious culture. In many different religious traditions, the body provides a frequently contested site for competing ideas about gender and sexuality to be considered as well as ideals of religious devotion. This PATS and symposium provides an opportunity for postgraduates and early career researchers to share their research in any aspect of religious history in the medieval, early modern or modern periods, that touches on devotion, gender and the body, whether in Jewish, Christian or Islamic contexts between the medieval and modern periods.

The PATS (which begins with a presentation by Prof Clare Waters on Friday at 11.00 am-12.00 noon) will provide an opportunity in the afternoon for student focused workshop sessions, where graduates can discuss their research with established scholars. On the Saturday, there will be speaker presentations and round table discussion about the theme of devotion, gender and the body in the medieval and early modern periods.

Invited Speakers

  • Dr Lisa Beaven (Centre for the History of the Emotions, University of Melbourne)
  • Assoc. Professor Erin Griffey (Dept of Art History, University of Auckland)
  • Dr Claire Walker (Dept of History, University of Adelaide)
  • Prof. Claire Waters (Dept of English, University of California at Davis)
  • Prof. Constant Mews (Centre for Religious Studies, Monash University)

Submissions

Interested postgraduate students are invited to apply for a place at the PATS by the extended to deadline of 15 June, addressed to The Secretary, Religious History Association, katharine.massam@ctm.uca.edu.au.

  1. Name, affiliation, research degree and title of research project
  2. A statement (up to 500 words) detailing the benefit of the PATS to your research
  3. One academic reference, normally from your research supervisor. This can be brief (up to 500 words), and should be included in your application.

The PATS is intended primarily for postgraduate students, but applications from early career researchers (within two years of completion of a doctoral degree) will also be considered.

A limited number of bursaries are available from the Religious History Association to postgraduates wishing to participate in this PATS and symposium, to assist in covering travel and overnight accommodation costs. See: http://ctm.uca.edu.au/support-services/accommodation.

Applications for these bursaries can be submitted with your application for the PATS, and should include a copy of a quotation for travel to and from the PATS, and for accommodation expenses.

Postgrads and researchers in the Melbourne region, interested in attending but not asking for a bursary, are encouraged to register by 15 June, in order that we can establish numbers.

Professor Constant Mews, President, Religious History Association: Constant.Mews@monash.edu

Devotion, Gender and the Body in the Religious Cultures of Europe 1100-1800: PATS and Symposium – Call For Applications

Religious History Association
“Devotion, Gender and the Body in the Religious Cultures of Europe 1100-1800”

A Postgraduate Advanced Training Seminar (PATS) and Symposium

  • Friday 18 August 2017 at Monash University (Clayton Campus): 11am-5pm
  • Saturday 19 August 2017 at Pilgrim Theological College, College Crescent, Parkville: 9:30am-4:30pm

The Religious History Association is keen to promote the study of religious history across a wide range of chronological periods and religious traditions. To this end, it is hosting a postgraduate advanced training seminar (PATS) and symposium, held on Friday 18 August under the auspices of the Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Monash University, at its Clayton Campus, and on Saturday 19 August at Pilgrim Theological College (part of the University of Divinity), College Crescent, Parkville.

Religious devotion has always been profoundly shaped by broader assumptions in society about gender and the body, involving access to the divine through the senses, the emotions and materiality. While the practice of theology and preaching has often been perceived as an exercise dominated by men, devotional practices have often been pursued by both men and women, providing a possibility to examine the impact of both gender and materiality in shaping religious culture. In many different religious traditions, the body provides a frequently contested site for competing ideas about gender and sexuality to be considered as well as ideals of religious devotion. This PATS and symposium provides an opportunity for postgraduates and early career researchers to share their research in any aspect of religious history in the medieval, early modern or modern periods, that touches on devotion, gender and the body, whether in Jewish, Christian or Islamic contexts between the medieval and modern periods.

The PATS (which begins with a presentation by Prof Clare Waters on Friday at 11.00 am-12.00 noon) will provide an opportunity in the afternoon for student focused workshop sessions, where graduates can discuss their research with established scholars. On the Saturday, there will be speaker presentations and round table discussion about the theme of devotion, gender and the body in the medieval and early modern periods.

Invited Speakers

  • Dr Lisa Beaven (Centre for the History of the Emotions, University of Melbourne)
  • Assoc. Professor Erin Griffey (Dept of Art History, University of Auckland)
  • Dr Claire Walker (Dept of History, University of Adelaide)
  • Prof. Claire Waters (Dept of English, University of California at Davis)
  • Prof. Constant Mews (Centre for Religious Studies, Monash University)

Submissions

Interested postgraduate students are invited to apply for a place at the PATS by end of Wednesday 7 June 2017, addressed to The Secretary, Religious History Association, katharine.massam@ctm.uca.edu.au.

  1. Name, affiliation, research degree and title of research project
  2. A statement (up to 500 words) detailing the benefit of the PATS to your research
  3. One academic reference, normally from your research supervisor. This can be brief (up to 500 words), and should be included in your application.

The PATS is intended primarily for postgraduate students, but applications from early career researchers (within two years of completion of a doctoral degree) will also be considered.

A limited number of bursaries are available from the Religious History Association to postgraduates wishing to participate in this PATS and symposium, to assist in covering travel and overnight accommodation costs. See: http://ctm.uca.edu.au/support-services/accommodation.

Applications for these bursaries can be submitted with your application for the PATS, and should include a copy of a quotation for travel to and from the PATS, and for accommodation expenses.

Professor Constant Mews, President, Religious History Association: Constant.Mews@monash.edu

Melbourne Masterclass: Objects, Sounds and Stories of Love

Melbourne Masterclass: Objects, Sounds and Stories of Love

Date: Wednesdays 12, 19, and 26 April, 2017
Time: 6:00pm-8:30pm

As part of the Love: Art of Emotion 1400-1800 exhibition held at the National Gallery of Victoria (March 31- June 18 2017) a masterclass held three weeks will examine a theme within the exhibition.

Led by Love: Art of Emotion curator and lead researcher, Dr Angela Hesson, the masterclass series will be a blend of lectures, discussions and performances exploring the materiality, visions and sounds of love.

There will also be exclusive exhibition viewing for the first two sessions.

To view the full program, including speaker biographies and abstracts, download the program flyer.

This masterclass program and free exhibition are subsidized through the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions. Spaces are limited.

University of Cambridge Shakespeare Summer Programme 2017 – Call For Applications

University of Cambridge Shakespeare Summer Programme 2017
International Summer Programmes, Cambridge, United Kingdom
6-19 August, 2017

This open-access programme will run from 6 to 19 August 2017 and allows participants to find out about the latest developments in Shakespeare studies. You can study the power, beauty, meaning and context of his plays, explore aspects of performance in workshops led by a professional actor and director, and discover connections with the wider world of Elizabethan culture. Leading academics teach our rich collection of open-access courses and the classroom sessions allow for close discussion. These are supplemented by morning lectures and evening talks given by subject specialists. What’s more, you can join an excursion to see Much Ado About Nothing at Shakespeare’s Globe and enjoy evening performances of some of his plays in beautiful College gardens.

What makes the programme so special is that you can choose to stay and dine in a historic Cambridge College, enjoy weekend excursions, social activities and all that Cambridge has to offer.

The closing date for applications is 24 July, 2017.

For more information, please visit: http://www.ice.cam.ac.uk/course/shakespeare-summer-programme.

If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact us at intenq@ice.cam.ac.uk.

Objects, Sounds and Stories of Love Masterclass Program (April 2017)

Melbourne Masterclass: Objects, Sounds and Stories of Love
Wednesdays 12, 19, and 26 April,2017 6.00pm-8.30pm

As part of the Love: Art of Emotion 1400-1800 exhibition held at the National Gallery of Victoria (March 31- June 18 2017) a masterclass series held over three weeks will examine a theme within the exhibition.

Led by Love: Art of Emotion curator and lead researcher, Dr Angela Hesson, the masterclass series will be a blend of lectures, discussions and performances exploring the materiality, visions and sounds of love.

There will also be exclusive exhibition viewing for the first two sessions.

To view the full program, including speaker biographies and abstracts, download the program flyer.

Program outline:

Wednesday 12 April: Objects of Love: History
Introduction by Dr Angela Hesson
Speakers: Professor Charles Zika, Dr Matthew Martin
Venue: Clemenger Auditorium BBDO, NGV International

Wednesday 19 April: Stories of Love: Film and Literature

Introduction by Dr Angela Hesson
Speakers: Professor Stephanie Trigg, Dr Mark Nicholls, Dr Lucy Van
Venue: Clemenger Auditorium BBDO, NGV International

Wednesday 26 April: Sounds of Love: Music
Introduction by Dr Angela Hesson
Speakers: Professor Jane Davidson, David Haberfeld, Dr Erin Helyard, Dr Anthony Lyons
Venue: Forum Theatre, Arts West Building, The University of Melbourne, Parkville

Cost: $40 individual session / $100 series pass (Includes light refreshments)

This masterclass program and free exhibition are subsidized through the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions. Spaces are limited.

A collaborative project produced with the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions at The University of Melbourne.

University of Cambridge: Medieval Studies Summer Programme – Call For Applications

University of Cambridge
Medieval Studies Summer Programme
6-19 August, 2017

The academic programme:

  • Four courses (two per week)
  • Series of plenary lectures: Rebellion and Revolt
  • Evening talks

Programme description:

Course Directors encourage you to develop your own arguments about big historical issues while helping you to understand the complexities of the chosen field. The programme is challenging and is predicated on doing advance reading. It attracts current undergraduate and graduate students, and college and university teachers. Its interdisciplinary nature will appeal to anyone with an interest in medieval studies. We welcome those coming from any background but with some knowledge and a genuine interest in the period. Courses are led by recognised experts from the University and other British universities. The typical week tab gives more information about the daily schedule.

For full details and course costs, please visit: http://www.ice.cam.ac.uk/course/medieval-studies-summer-programme

Applications close 24 July, 2017.

Love: Art of Emotion 1400-1800 Exhibition @ NGV and Master Classes @ The University of Melbourne

Love: Art of Emotion 1400-1800
Opens 31 March, Runs until 18 June
NGV International, Melbourne

More info: http://www.ngv.vic.gov.au/exhibition/love

Love: Art of Emotion 1400–1800
draws upon the NGV’s diverse permanent collection to explore the theme of love in art, and the changing representations of this complex emotion throughout the early modern period in Europe.

While popular conceptions of love tend frequently to focus upon romantic love, Love: Art of Emotion explores love’s varied manifestations across the realms of human experience, including familial relationships, religious devotion, friendship, altruism, patriotism, narcissism, materialism and nostalgia. The exhibition presents depictions of love’s many variations in painting, sculpture, prints and drawings, as well as non-representational and functional objects such as costume, furniture and religious artefacts.

Featuring more than 200 works from the NGV’s International Collection, some of which have never been displayed before, the exhibition demonstrates the balance between modest and grandiose, civic and domestic, micro and macro, from Vivarini’s grand-scale, much-celebrated painting The Garden of Love to tiny pieces of jewellery, worn against the body as love tokens or in memoriam. Through these diverse objects and images, the exhibition explores notions of public display and private emotion, ostentation and intimacy, of performance and of feeling.

The exhibition also considers love in relation to its associated emotions such as desire, wonder, ecstasy, affection, compassion, envy, melancholy, longing and hope, as well as the ways in which these combine and intersect. Bringing together a diverse array of works from the Medieval to the Romantic period, Love: Art of Emotion examines the shifting, multifaceted expressions of this rich and perennially relevant subject.

There will be a series of masterclasses associated with this exhibition. Information about these events can be found here: http://alumni.online.unimelb.edu.au/love2017

This exhibition is produced in collaboration with the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions, The National Gallery of Victoria and The University of Melbourne.